25 High-Paying Trade Jobs in Demand for 2022

25 High-Paying Trade Jobs in Demand

With the cost of higher education out of reach for many, more young people are flocking to high-paying trade jobs that don’t require a bachelor’s degree. Many of these jobs not only pay well, but are typically in high demand through unpredictable job markets or economic conditions.

What Is a Trade Job?

A trade job is a profession that doesn’t require a college degree, but rather a specialized skill or skill set obtained through a trade school or on-the-job experience and training. Popular trade jobs include construction managers, technicians, dental hygienists, mechanics, commercial pilots, and real estate brokers.

Pros of a Skilled Trade Job

A skilled trade job can be an attractive career path for a couple of reasons:

Educational Requirements

Unlike careers that require a college degree, which can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and take four years to complete, trade jobs can often be obtained with less than two years of specialized education and at a fraction of the cost. Some trade jobs do not require any supplemental education at all, allowing trade workers to earn a living without being saddled by any student loan debt.

Recommended: Is the Average College Tuition Rising?

Job Security

Many trade jobs are in high demand due to the specialized knowledge and skilled physical labor needed to perform them. They are also potentially at lower risk of outsourcing or automation because they require a physically present human.

Cons of a Skilled Trade Job

On the other hand, there are negative connotations with some trade jobs, including:

Physically Demanding

Trade jobs that involve a lot of labor, like HVAC technicians, construction workers, and mechanics, can take a physical toll over the course of a long career.

Potentially Dangerous

Certain trade jobs have high injury and mortality rates, particularly ones that involve the operation of heavy machinery or working in hazardous environments.

25 Trade Jobs That Make the Most Money

Despite conventional wisdom that a bachelor’s or master’s degree is required to earn a good salary, trade jobs can pay very well. In fact, some of the highest-paying jobs in certain states are skilled trades.

Here are 25 of the highest-paying trade jobs in 2023, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics:

1. Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Manager

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $99,200

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; 5+ years of work experience

•   Job Description: Supervising and coordinating the transportation, storage, testing, and shipping of materials or products in accordance with government regulations.

•   Duties:

◦   Supervising workers involved in receiving or shipping

◦   Inspecting warehouse and equipment safety

◦   Analyzing logistics and collaborating with other departments

2. Elevator/Escalator Installers & Repairer

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $102,420

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; apprenticeship; license (certain states)

•   Job Description: Assemble, install, maintain, and fix elevators, escalators, chairlifts and other moving walkways and equipment. In addition to understanding the mechanics and components of each system, they are typically involved in the physical repair or replacement of parts, as well as testing equipment to ensure it meets specifications.

•   Duties:

◦   Assembling elevators, escalators, and similar units

◦   Conducting preventative maintenance and inspections

◦   Maintaining service records

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3. Nuclear Power Reactor Operator

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $120,350

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; long-term on-the-job training; U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission license

•   Job Description: Responsible for controlling and maintaining the systems that generate and distribute power to businesses, homes, or factories. This can include electricity generated through gas, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, or solar energy.

•   Duties:

◦   Monitoring voltage and electricity grids

◦   Adjusting control rods and electricity output

◦   Recording systems data

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4. Radiation Therapist

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $98,300

•   Requirements: Associate degree (preferred) or certificate; state and national license

•   Job Description: Administer radiation therapy to patients with cancer and other illnesses.

•   Duties:

◦   Explain treatment plans to patients

◦   Calibrate and operate radiation machinery

◦   Monitor patient and keep records of treatment

5. Subway and Streetcar Operator

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $84,270

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; moderate on-the-job training; local transit training program (varies by location)

•   Job Description: Operate subways and aboveground street cars, ensuring passengers safely move from one location to another.

•   Duties:

◦   Operate train controls

◦   Make announcements and provide verbal directions to passengers

◦   Ensure overall passenger safety

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6. Nuclear Medicine Technologist

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $92,500

•   Requirements: Associate degree from an accredited nuclear medicine technology program; state license; long-term on-the-job training

•   Job Description: Prepare and administer radioactive drugs for imaging or treatment, typically within hospitals, medical labs, and care centers.

•   Duties:

◦   Explain medical procedures to patients

◦   Prep and administer drugs to patients

◦   Maintain and operate imaging equipment

7. Gas Plant Operator

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $82,560

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; long-term on-the-job training

•   Job Description: Oversee the day-to-day operations of industrial power plants used by utilities, oil and gas, and manufacturing companies.

•   Duties:

◦   Maintaining equipment and machinery

◦   Ensuring compliance with safety and regulatory standards

◦   Supervising employees and contractors at the plant

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8. Dental Hygienist

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $87,530

•   Education Requirements: Associate degree; state license

•   Job Description: Examine patients for oral diseases and provide preventative care and education about oral hygiene.

•   Duties:

◦   Taking dental x-rays

◦   Assisting dentists in providing teeth cleaning and plaque removal

◦   Educating patients about oral hygiene techniques

9. Sonography Technician

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $81,350

•   Requirements: Associate degree; state license

•   Job Description: Operate sonographs that produce images of the inside of a body in order to assess and diagnose medical conditions.

•   Duties:

◦   Prepping and administering sonograph exams

◦   Reviewing images and test results for quality

◦   Analyzing diagnostic information and providing summaries for physicians

10. Electrical Line Installer and Repairer

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $85,420

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; long-term on-the-job training

•   Job Description: Install and repair electrical power systems and telecommunications systems.

•   Duties:

◦   Installing, inspecting, and testing power lines, and equipment

◦   Identifying defective devices, transformers, and switches

◦   Stringing power lines between buildings and structures

11. Construction Manager

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $104,900

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; 5+ years of experience

•   Job Description: Supervise and coordinate the activities of construction workers.

•   Duties:

◦   Overseeing construction projects from start to finish

◦   Scheduling and supervising on-site contractors

◦   Preparing and monitoring budgets

12. Aircraft Technician

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $75,400

•   Requirements: Certificate of completion from a Part 147 FAA-approved aviation maintenance technician school

•   Job Description: Repair and perform maintenance on aircraft and aircraft equipment.

•   Duties:

◦   Diagnosing mechanical and electrical issues

◦   Repairing aircraft components

◦   Testing aircraft parts with diagnostic equipment

13. Boilermaker

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $71,140

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; apprenticeship

•   Job Description: Assemble, maintain, and repair boilers, vats, or other containers used to hold liquids and gas.

•   Duties:

◦   Reading blueprints to determine where to position boiler parts

◦   Assembling boiler tankers using welding machines

◦   Cleaning boiling vats and replacing broken valves and pipes

14. Wellhead Pumper

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $71,830

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; moderate on-the-job training

•   Job Description: Operate power pumps and equipment used to extract oil or gas from an oil field well.

•   Duties:

◦   Assembling pumps and attach hoses to wellheads

◦   Operating pumps and monitoring flow

◦   Transferring oil to storage tank or truck

15. Electronic Engineering Technologist

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $72,800

•   Requirements: Associate degree (preferred); certificate from accredited program

•   Job Description: Assist electrical engineers with the design and development of communications equipment, computers, medical devices, and other electric-powered equipment.

•   Duties:

◦   Designing and assembling electrical systems

◦   Observing onsite systems placement and performance

◦   Performing quality control and identify issues

16. Real Estate Agents

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $54,300

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; licensing exam

•   Job Description: Help clients buy, sell, or rent their properties.

•   Duties:

◦   Generating lists of properties for sale or rent and showing them to clients

◦   Advising clients on prices, mortgages, and market conditions

◦   Facilitating buyer/seller negotiations and final purchase or rental agreements

17. Respiratory Therapist

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $77,960

•   Requirements: Associate degree

•   Job Description: Provide care for patients having trouble breathing.

•   Duties:

◦   Examining patients and recording symptoms and conditions

◦   Consulting with physicians on treatment

◦   Performing diagnostic tests

18. Building Inspector

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $67,700

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

•   Job Description: Review building plans to ensure construction meets local and national regulations and ordinances.

•   Duties:

◦   Monitoring construction to ensure compliance

◦   Inspecting electrical and plumbing systems to ensure they are up to code

◦   Issuing violations for non-compliant work

19. Millwright

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $62,980

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

•   Job Description: Install, dismantle, repair, reassemble, and move machinery in factories, power plants, and construction sites.

•   Duties:

◦   Repair or replace malfunctioning equipment

◦   Clean, adjust, and calibrate new machinery

◦   Move machinery and equipment

20. Electrician

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $61,590

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; apprenticeship

•   Job Description: Install, maintain, and repair electrical power, communications, lighting, and control systems.

•   Duties:

◦   Identify and repair electrical problems

◦   Install wiring and equipment for electrical systems

◦   Ensure compliance with National Electrical Code

21. Plumber

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $61,550

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; apprenticeship

•   Job Description: Install and repair gas and water piping systems in homes, factories, and businesses.

•   Duties:

◦   Identify and repair plumbing problems

◦   Installing pipes and plumbing fixtures

◦   Clean drains, remove obstructions, and repair or replace broken pipes and fixtures

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22. Mining Roof Bolter

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $66,660

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; moderate on-the-job training

•   Job Description: Operate machinery to install roof supporting bolts in underground mines.

•   Duties:

◦   Drill bolt holes into roofs

◦   Perform safety checks on bolting equipments

◦   Extract loose rock from bolting support

23. Broadcast, Sound, and Video Technician

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $54,160

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; moderate on-the-job training

•   Job Description: Operate and maintain electrical equipment used for television broadcast, radio programs, live concerts, and films.

•   Duties:

◦   Setting up and operating equipment

◦   Monitoring and adjusting audio and visual quality

◦   Repairing equipment and fixing recording issues

24. HVACR Technician

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $57,300

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; 6 months to 2 years at a trade school or community college that offers heating, air conditioning, and registration programs.

•   Job Description: Install and perform maintenance on heating, ventilation, cooling and registration systems for buildings and private residences.

•   Duties:

◦   Installing, testing, and repairing HVACR systems

◦   Replacing or repairing defective parts

◦   Conducting overall system maintenance and performance improvements

25. Masonry Worker

•   2023 Median Annual Salary: $53,010

•   Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent; apprenticeship or on-the-job training

•   Job Description: Use brick, concrete, and natural and manmade stones to build structures, walls, or walkways.

•   Duties:

◦   Design blueprints and calculate materials needed

◦   Break or resize materials into required shape

◦   Align, construct and polish finished structures

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The Takeaway

Many trade jobs can offer competitive pay and job security, without a significant upfront educational cost. Moreover, they provide an opportunity to help make a difference by solving real world problems.

Choosing the right career path is an important step toward achieving your financial goals. It’s just as important to practice smart financial habits, like setting spending limits, staying on top of your credit score, and establishing long-term goals.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.


See exactly how your money comes and goes at a glance.

FAQ

What skilled trades are in demand?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, medical sonographers, respiratory therapists, industrial machinery mechanics, security and fire alarm installers are expected to experience the greatest job growth over the next ten years.

What are some of the best trades to learn that pay well?

Transportation managers, elevator installers, nuclear power reactor operators, and radiation therapists all earn a median salary above $80,000.

What are high paying trade jobs that require no degree?

HVAC technicians, real estate agents, subway operators, and plumbers all pay above-average salaries and require no formal degree.


Photo credit: iStock/dima_sidelnikov

SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

*Terms and conditions apply. This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed towards active SoFi accounts, such as your SoFi Checking or Savings account, subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

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Things to Budget For After Buying a Home

Things to Budget for After Buying a Home

After you purchase a new home, there are many things to budget for, including moving costs, new furniture, and ongoing expenses such as your mortgage. Although it may seem like many of the significant expenditures are out of the way once you close on a property, there are additional costs that can add up.

To avoid financial surprises, it’s wise to jot down and budget for all of the extra expenses you will encounter when you move into your new place. To help you organize your finances, here are the things to budget for after buying a house.

Moving-Out Expenses to Budget for

Before you take up residence in your new home, you must move all of your things. Even if you pack and move all your belongings yourself, you’ll still have to spend on things like boxes, packing materials, and a truck. And if you use movers, it will cost you even more.

Recommended: The Ultimate Moving Checklist

Moving Your Belongings

There are three main options for moving your belongings:

•   Renting a truck and doing it yourself. It’s more cost efficient than using professional movers, but DIY moving yourself still adds up. You’ll have to pay for the truck rental fee, gas, and damage protection. If you’re moving across the country, you may also have to factor in the costs of shipping some of your items. Even though you can enlist your friends and family to help you do the heavy lifting, the cost of moving yourself can still be significant, and it’s a lot of work.

•   Hiring movers. If you decide to use professional movers, it’s wise to shop around to find the best price. Here’s why: For moves under 100 miles away, the national average cost of moving is $1,400, and it ranges from $800 to $2,500. If you’re moving long distance, the average cost can be as high as $2,200 to $5,700. To cut costs, you can do your own packing, which may save you money.

•   Moving your things in a storage container. Another option is to use a hauling container — you load your things in it, and the container company moves it to your new location. This usually costs between $500 and $5,000, depending on the distance and how much stuff you’re moving. Long-distance moves will usually cost more than local ones.

Moving Supplies

If you decide to go the DIY moving route, you will need to buy boxes, bubble wrap, labels, and tape. And you likely have more items to wrap and box up than you think, which requires even more supplies.

Cleaning Supplies

You’ll probably want to clean your current property before you move out, and you’ll definitely want to clean the new place when you move in. That means buying mops, sponges, cleaning solutions, and paper towels. You may also want to get the carpets cleaned or hire a professional house cleaner if the place needs a deep cleaning.

10 Common Expenses After Buying a Home

Once the move is done, there are other expenses you’ll need to account for as you settle into your new abode. Here are a few things to budget for after buying a home.

Furniture and Appliances

You’ll likely bring some furniture and decor from your old place, but you’ll probably want to purchase some new things as well. For example, if the appliances are outdated, you might want to upgrade to new ones. And you may have more rooms to furnish, which requires additional furniture.

Consider opening a savings account for the new items you want to purchase. It can also help pay for any unexpected costs, such as having to replace a hot water heater that breaks.

Mortgage Payments

As a homeowner, every month you will making a mortgage payment that typically includes:

•   The principal portion of the payment. This is the percentage of your mortgage that reduces your payment over the life of the loan. The more you pay toward principal, the less you will have to pay in interest.

•   The interest. This is the amount you pay to borrow funds from the bank or lender to purchase your home.

If you are using an escrow account to pay your mortgage, other things may be included in your payment, such as your property taxes, insurance, and private mortgage insurance. This guide to reading your mortgage statement can help you understand all the costs involved in your mortgage payment.

Property Taxes

Property taxes are the taxes you pay on your home. In many cases, these taxes are the second most significant expense after your mortgage. Property taxes are based on the value of your home, which is typically governed by your state. The county you live in collects and calculates the sum due. Usually, property tax calculations are done every year, so the amount you owe may fluctuate annually.

Homeowners Insurance

Homeowners insurance helps protect your home from damage or destruction caused by events like a fire, wind storm, or vandalism. It can also protect you from lawsuits or property damages you are liable for. If someone slips and falls on your sidewalk, for instance, homeowners insurance will pay for the injured person’s medical bills and the legal costs if they decide to sue you.

The cost you pay for this coverage will vary by the type and amount of coverage you select.

Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI)

For borrowers who can’t afford a down payment that’s 20% of the mortgage value, lenders usually require private mortgage insurance (PMI). This type of coverage is designed to protect the lender if you default on your mortgage payments.

PMI can cost as much as a few hundred dollars per month, depending on the sum you borrow.

HOA Dues

This is a Homeowner’s Association fee, which goes toward the upkeep of property in a planned community, co-op, or condo. The amount can range from a couple of hundred dollars a year to more than $2,000, depending on the amenities you’re paying for (like a pool and landscaping). You typically pay HOA fees monthly, quarterly, or annually.

Utilities

Your utility payments include water, gas, electric, trash, and sewer fees. Some bills like water and electricity are based on the amount you use every month, so monitoring your electric and water usage, like taking short showers and turning lights off, can help lower your cost. Other payments, such as your trash or recycling, might be a fixed amount.

Lawn Care

Maintaining the curb appeal of your home requires landscape services and lawn care. If you choose to mow your own lawn, you may need to factor in the purchase of a mower, which can cost about $1,068 on average. If you hire a lawn service to cut your grass, you may pay $25 to $50 a week.

Pest Control

Pests, such as ants, ticks, rodents, or mice, can wreak havoc on your home and your family’s health. For these reasons, many homeowners hire a pest control company to prevent the infestation of pests around their homes. The company’s initial visit may cost between $150 to $300, then $45 to $75 for every follow-up.

Home Improvement Costs

As a homeowner, there are likely things you want to change about your house. From painting the walls to a complete kitchen renovation, transforming your property can add to the cost of owning a home. According to the HomeAdvisor 2023 State of Home Spending Report, homeowners spend an average of $9,542 on home improvement each year.

Additionally, as the features of your home age, you will need to replace and repair them accordingly.

Common Mistakes After Buying a Home

One of the most common mistakes people make when buying a home is spending more than they can afford. For instance, you may forget to factor in utilities, lawn care, HOA fees, costs of upkeep, and other hidden expenses that come with owning a home. It’s crucial to do your research to determine extra costs and add them up before you move forward with purchasing a property.

Another mistake new homeowners make is taking on too many DIY projects. TV shows can make home renovations look easy. However, many of these projects require professionals who know what they are doing. Attempting a home improvement project could cost you more to fix than hiring a pro in the first place. In fact, about 80% of homeowners that attempt their own renovation projects make mistakes — some of them serious.

Unless you can afford an expert, you may want to rethink purchasing a home that requires a lot of renovation.

The 50/30/20 Rule

For help planning your budget as a homeowner, you can use the 50/30/20 rule, which breaks your budget into three categories:

•   50% goes to to needs

•   30% goes to wants

•   20% goes to to savings

That means you’ll be budgeting 50% of your income to go toward necessities such as housing costs, grocery bills, and car payments. Then 30% will go toward things you want, such as entertainment (movies, concerts), vacations, new clothes, and dining out. The remaining 20% goes towards saving for the future or financial goals such as home improvement projects.

Using a 50/30/20 budget rule is simple and easy. It allows you to see where your money is going and helps you save.

Recommended: How to Track Home Improvement Costs

Lifestyle Tradeoffs in Order to Budget

With so many things to budget for after buying a home, you may need to cut back on spending. Start by looking at your discretionary spending and think about where you can trim back. For example, instead of eating out regularly, you can cook more meals at home. Or perhaps you can put your gym membership on hold and do at-home workouts for a while to stay in shape physically and financially.

Recommended: How to Budget in 5 Steps

The Takeaway

After you buy a house, there are many expenses you may not have accounted for, such as the cost of hiring movers; buying furniture; and getting your new place painted, cleaned, and ready to move into. Making a budget is vital to keep you on track financially, so you can enjoy your new home.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.


See exactly how your money comes and goes at a glance.

FAQ

How much money should you have leftover after buying a house?

After buying a home, the amount you have left will vary depending on your financial situation. However, it’s a good idea to have at least three to six months of living expenses in reserve. That way, in case of an emergency, you can stay afloat financially.

Is it worth putting more than 20% down?

Putting more than 20% down on your home can help lower your monthly mortgage payment and interest because you’ll be borrowing less money. It also gives you more equity in your home from the beginning. But make sure you can afford to pay more than 20% in order not to stretch beyond your budget.

What’s the 50-30-20 budget rule?

The 50/30/20 rule means that you budget 50% of your expenses for needs (housing, groceries, loan payments), 30% for wants (entertainment, eating out, shopping), and 20% toward savings goals (retirement, renovations, new furniture).


Photo credit: iStock/ArtMarie

SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

*Terms and conditions apply. This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed towards active SoFi accounts, such as your SoFi Checking or Savings account, subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

SORL-Q224-1921152-V1

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How to Dispute a Credit Report and Win the Dispute Case

How to Dispute a Credit Report and Win the Dispute Case

One of the most important chores on any financial to-do list is to regularly review your credit reports for errors. If an error does appear, disputing it is a fairly simple process with a big potential payoff: It might help build your credit score.

Keep reading to learn how to dispute a credit report and win.

How to Get an Accurate Credit Report

Consumers can access their credit reports for free every 12 months from the three major credit bureaus: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. These credit reporting companies feature similar but not identical data, and any errors may appear on one or more reports.

There are three ways to request a report:

•  Online: AnnualCreditReport.com

•  Phone: (877) 322-8228

•  Mail: Download an Annual Credit Report Request form from the URL above, and mail it to:
Annual Credit Report Request Service
P.O. Box 105281
Atlanta, GA 30348-5281

You can request all three reports at once or each one at different times without paying a fee. Helpful hint: By ordering one at a time and spacing out requests every four months, you can be fairly confident about catching major issues while they’re fresh and easier to dispute. For example, you might order the Experian report in February, the TransUnion one in June, and Equifax in October – all for free.

After your free annual access has ended, you can pay to check your credit reports as often as you like. Credit reporting companies can’t legally charge a consumer more than $13.50 for a report. It’s also possible to access credit reports through specialty consumer reporting companies, some of which charge a fee.

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Why It’s Important to Correct Mistakes in Your Credit Report

Credit reports generally make it easy to spot negative financial information like missed payments. However, take care to review your credit report for other incorrect data, however minor, such as former addresses and employers. Common credit report errors include inaccurate bank balances, duplicate account info, and false late payments.

In case of an error, take steps to have the mistake removed as soon as possible. Credit report errors can lead to a bad credit score, impact loan applications, or raise your interest rate. Bad marks on a credit report can also affect your employment options, insurance premiums, and ability to rent an apartment.

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How to Dispute Errors on Your Credit Reports

To dispute an error on a credit report, you’ll need to contact each credit bureau that published the error. Mistakes can appear on one report only or all three. Each credit bureau has its own dispute process, so check the instructions on AnnualCreditReport.com or the individual credit bureau sites. You’ll likely need to fill out a dispute form and provide supporting documentation that helps prove an error was made.

If your dispute is accepted, follow up to make sure the credit bureau and the business that supplied the incorrect information update their records accordingly. If a mistake is easy to prove, start with the business that made the error. Be aware that credit bureaus and businesses cannot charge you to correct errors on your report.

In the case that a mistake on a credit report is due to identity theft, it’s important to report that to IdentityTheft.gov and get a personalized recovery plan.

Recommended: Guide to Building Credit With No Credit History

Example Letter for Disputing a Mistake on Your Credit Report

Usually, a dispute needs to be submitted in writing. If you submit a letter via the Post Office, send it certified mail with “return receipt requested.” That way you have proof that the credit bureau received the letter.

The following information should generally be included in a dispute letter:

Identifying Information

The date, consumer’s name, and their address all need to be included in the letter.

Each Item That Needs Disputing

Whether there is one error or many, each one should be outlined briefly and clearly. Identify each error, explain why the information is wrong, and supply the correct information if applicable. Then request to have the error corrected or removed.

Copy of the Credit Report

It can be helpful to enclose a copy of the credit report with the errors circled. Don’t send any original documentation with your letter. Make copies and keep the originals safe in case they are needed again.

Why Consider Credit Score Monitoring

To efficiently keep an eye on your credit reports, you may opt to use a credit monitoring service. These services will update account holders when certain credit updates appear, such as new accounts, hard inquiries, high credit card balances, or a missed payment.

Not only does credit monitoring make it easier for consumers to stay on top of their credit and work toward building their credit score, but it can help catch fraud and identity theft early.

How to Report Credit Scams

If you suspect you’ve been the victim of a credit scam, report it to IdentityTheft.gov, a division of the Federal Trade Commission. They will provide a personalized recovery plan, walk you through the steps, track your progress, and even pre-fill forms and letters for you. Then, you should dispute any false information on your credit report.

The Takeaway

Disputing and correcting errors on your credit report is usually straightforward, as long as the mistake can be proven. Whenever possible, reach out directly to the business that reported the mistaken info. Then, follow the dispute instructions for each of the three major credit bureaus: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. Regularly review your credit reports annually to catch errors early, before they negatively affect your financial record – and your life.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.


See exactly how your money comes and goes at a glance.

FAQ

Who always wins a credit dispute?

There is no one party or side that always “wins” a credit dispute. If the consumer can document that an error was made, they will likely win the dispute.

What reason should I put for disputing a credit report?

The reason for disputing an error on a credit report can be a typo, outdated information (more than seven years old), data that belongs to another consumer, or fraud, among other things. Include any supporting documentation you have to help strengthen your argument.

Does disputing a collection notice reset the clock?

No, but a dispute does pause the clock in regard to bill collectors. Once you dispute a debt in collections, the collections agency can’t contact you again until they have provided verification of the debt in writing to the consumer.


Photo credit: iStock/mediaphotos

SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

*Terms and conditions apply. This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed towards active SoFi accounts, such as your SoFi Checking or Savings account, subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

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What Are Income Verification Documents for an Apartment Application?

Income verification documents, which are typically requested when you’re applying to rent a home or apartment, are documents that prove you have a job and are earning an income.

A landlord requests these documents to ensure that you’re earning enough to cover your rent payments each month. The income verification paperwork requested may vary from landlord to landlord, and the documents may also differ, depending on your specific career situation. The landlord is simply doing their due diligence to make sure you can afford the rental.

Key Points

•   Income verification documents are required by landlords to confirm a potential tenant’s ability to pay rent.

•   Common documents include pay stubs, tax returns or W2 forms, and bank statements.

•   For self-employed individuals, 1099 forms or personal tax returns may be necessary.

•   Additional proof like a letter from an employer can also be used to verify income.

•   These documents help ensure that the rent does not exceed a reasonable portion of the tenant’s income.

How to Show Proof of Income to Rent an Apartment

There are a number of ways that prospective renters can show proof of income to a prospective landlord or property management company. The types of documents you need to produce will likely depend on the specific request from the landlord.

Generally, there are a few standard income verification documents that landlords and property managers are looking for:

•  Pay stubs

•  Tax returns or W2 forms

•  Bank statements

•  A letter from your employer

Typically, a landlord will request two forms of income verification. Often, your pay stubs and tax forms will suffice as proof of income. But in some cases, you may need to submit several months’ worth of bank statements. You might even need to ask your employer to write you a letter to assure the landlord that you have a job and do have income.

How to Show Proof of Income if You’re Self-Employed

If you’re self-employed, the process can be more complicated. You may need to submit 1099 tax forms or your personal tax returns showing regular and steady income going back a couple of years. Depending on the nature of your self-employment, you may have business tax returns, such as a Schedule C if you own and run a small business, that you can use to verify your income.

You can also use bank statements from your business bank account to show a landlord that you have income. The documents required will likely be similar to those you need when applying for self-employed personal loans. Ask the landlord what will work best for them so you will know exactly what documents you should present.

How to Show Proof of Income for Side Hustles

You may have a side hustle — perhaps you make and sell crafts online, for instance — and that’s similar to owning a small business. And you should be reporting the income you make from your side hustle to the IRS on your tax return. By presenting your tax return to a landlord, you can prove that you’re making side hustle income.

If you’re working for a ridesharing app or food delivery service, the company should be sending you a tax statement with your annual earnings so that you can report them on your tax return. You can always show a copy of that tax statement to a prospective landlord.

Why Proof of Income is Important

Proving your income is important when you rent an apartment — or apply for credit, for that matter — because it shows that you have money coming in every month, and are able to fulfill your financial obligations. In other words, it shows the property owner that you can make your rent payments.

Recommended: What Is The Difference Between Transunion and Equifax?

Understanding Rent-to-Income Ratio

Along with proving your income, you need to make sure that your rent is not eating up too much of your paycheck. That’s where the “rent-to-income ratio” comes into play. It calculates the percentage of your total income that you’re spending on rent.

The general rule of thumb is that you shouldn’t spend more than 30% of your gross monthly income on housing costs. Depending on where you live, those costs may be a higher or lower percentage of your income, but try to aim for around 30%. An online money tracker can help you keep tabs on your spending.

To figure out your rent-to-income ratio, divide your total annual earnings by 12, which gives you your monthly earnings, and multiply that number by 0.3 (or 30%). The result is how much you can afford to spend on rent per month.

Annual earnings ÷ 12 x 0.3 = How much you can afford to pay for rent

For example, let’s say you earn $50,000 a year. Divide that number by 12 and multiply it by 0.3 and you get $1,250. That’s what you should aim to spend on rent each month. Depending on where you live, you may need to spend more, but that figure gives you a ballpark of where you should be in order to have enough money to pay for your other expenses and hopefully, contribute to your savings as well.

How to Best Prepare to Pay Rent

When you are approved by a landlord to rent an apartment, you’ll need to plan and prepare to pay your rent on time and in full every month.

That means having your finances in order. First, you should have a checking account set up. Typically, you’ll pay your landlord by check or through an online portal and either way, you’ll need a bank account in order to do this. You may be surprised to learn that more than 6% of U.S. households (or more than 14 million people) don’t have a bank account. Fortunately, it’s easy to open a bank account if you don’t have one.

Next, make sure that you’re properly budgeting for your rental expenses. You want to make sure that you have enough money in your account to cover the rent when your landlord cashes your check. A budget planner app can help.

There are other expenses that can go along with renting an apartment or home that you may need to pay. Here are a few you should be aware of:

•  Utility bills

•  Renters insurance

•  Parking, maintenance, and fees for amenities such as a gym or pool

Finally, know the terms of your lease. It’s common for rent to go up once a lease expires, which you may discover when you go to re-sign or renegotiate the rent. Unfortunately, renting is not like a fixed-rate mortgage when you have a monthly rate locked in. So don’t be surprised if the costs of staying in your apartment go up after your lease expires.

The Takeaway

Income verification documents offer proof to a landlord or property management company that you have enough money coming in every month to pay the cost of an apartment or home rental. Typically, pay stubs, tax returns, and bank statements are the only forms of documentation you need. However, if you are a small business owner, you may be required to produce additional documents. The good news: Once you are approved to rent, you can start the process of moving in.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.

SoFi helps you stay on top of your finances.

FAQ

Can you rent an apartment with no income?

It is possible to rent an apartment with no income, though it likely will be quite difficult. In this instance, having a high credit score can help, because it shows you have a track record of paying your expenses. A healthy savings account can also be useful to prove you have money in the bank.

Can proof of income for an apartment be faked?

It is possible to fake proof of income for an apartment by using online tools to create fake pay stubs and other documents. This constitutes fraud and is illegal, but it does happen.

Is proof of income different for a student?

Yes, it can be, yes. If a student has no income because they are studying full-time, they may need to get a co-signer like a parent or guarantor in order to secure a lease.


Photo credit: iStock/Anna Kim

SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Guide to Paying Online With a Checking Account

You can pay with a checking account online, provided a company accepts this payment form. Many do, such as Amazon and Walmart. This can be a welcome convenience if you are trying to pay down or avoid credit card debt.

However, some online retailers don’t allow checking accounts as payment methods, so workarounds may be required in order to complete your transaction. Here’s how to shop online with a checking account and what to do if a business doesn’t support this form of payment.

Can You Pay Online With a Checking Account?

Shoppers can pay online with a checking account when online retailers accept this form of payment. Not all businesses accept checking accounts as a payment method on their websites. Many online retailers may only take credit cards or payment apps, so it’s important to check the website for accepted forms of payment.

Get up to $300 when you bank with SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings Account with direct deposit and get up to a $300 cash bonus. Plus, get up to 4.60% APY on your cash!


Where Can You Pay With Your Checking Account Online?

You can pay online with your checking account when a company’s website accepts it as a valid form of payment. For example, Amazon allows checking accounts as a payment option for purchases. So too does Walmart. Some companies may also accept electronic checks.

Recommended: Reasons to Open a Checking Account

How to Shop Online With Your Checking Account

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to shop online and pay with a checking account:

Find a Retailer That Accepts Checking Accounts

Start by finding an online retailer that accepts checking account payments. Some retailers don’t take payments this way, so it’s essential to double-check the website’s FAQ page, review checkout options, or chat with a customer service representative about payment options.

Verify Website Security

Before proceeding with your purchase, it’s crucial to ensure the website is secure. Look for the reassuring “https://” at the beginning of the URL and a padlock icon in the address bar. This signifies that the website encrypts data during transmission, providing a secure environment for your payment details. Additionally, the website’s privacy policy should explicitly state its commitment to protecting your payment information, further enhancing your sense of security.

Access Your Checking Account Information

To proceed smoothly, make sure you have your checking account information at hand. This includes your account number and routing number, which you can find on your checks or by logging into your bank account online. The routing number is always nine digits, while bank account numbers are typically from eight to 12 digits (but can be as long as 17), depending on your bank. Also, ensure you have sufficient funds in your checking account to cover the purchase amount.

Shop and Check Out

Add the items to your cart that you want to purchase, and proceed to checkout. When you reach the payment section, select the option to pay with a checking account or electronic check. These options may also be called “ACH” or “eCheck” when you go to pay.

Enter Your Account Information

When entering your checking account information, do so accurately. This usually includes typing in your account number, routing number, and sometimes the name on the account. You may also have to submit your address for additional identification information. Take a moment to double-check the information to avoid any potential errors.

Complete the Purchase

After entering your checking account details, review your order summary, and verify the total purchase amount. Once you’re satisfied, confirm the payment to complete the transaction. Depending on the retailer, you may receive a confirmation email and/or see an order confirmation page.

Monitor Your Account

After making the purchase, keep an eye on your checking account activity to ensure the correct amount has been deducted. Most retailers process payments within a few business days, so the deduction may not appear immediately.

You may also see a small charge — usually a few dollars — on your account from the merchant. Some online retailers issue this charge and immediately refund it to check if the bank account information is valid.

Pros and Cons of Paying Online With Your Checking Account

Paying with a checking account when shopping online has specific perks and drawbacks you should consider alongside your financial circumstances.

Pros:

•   Using a checking account can be a valuable option if you don’t have or want to use a credit card or debit card to shop online.

•   For some people, it can be easier to manage a budget using their checking account.

•   Online shopping with a checking account could potentially be cheaper, depending on what fees are assessed on different methods.

•   Unlike credit cards, you must have sufficient cash in your checking account to complete a purchase. This requirement can prevent you from impulse buying and going into debt.

Cons:

•   Many online retailers don’t take checking account information for payments, meaning you’ll need a credit card, debit card, or payment app to make online purchases.

•   Insufficient funds in your checking account can lead to overdraft fees and rejected transactions.

•   Checking accounts usually don’t offer the cash back rewards you can earn from using credit and debit cards,

•   Credit cards often have robust purchase protection policies, helping to secure you against fraud.

Alternatives to Using Your Checking Account to Pay for Online Shopping

Several alternatives to paying with a checking account online are available for shoppers. Each has different benefits and considerations, so it’s wise to choose the option that best fits your needs and preferences.

•   Debit cards: Debit cards connect to your checking account and can be used to make purchases online, just like credit cards. They deduct funds directly from your checking account after you make a purchase. Debit cards offer convenience and security, but you’ll need to monitor your account balance to avoid overdraft fees. Most online retailers accept this payment option. However, debit cards may not offer the same purchase protections that credit cards do.

•   Prepaid debit cards: Instead of a debit card linked to your checking account, you can use a prepaid debit card. This option entails loading funds onto the card from a checking or savings account and using it for purchases until the balance runs out. This can help control your spending or function as your main payment method if you don’t have a traditional bank account.

Prepaid debit cards are widely accepted for online purchases. While they don’t contain your bank account information, they also probably don’t have purchase protection or security alerts. You may also have to pay a fee to obtain one.

•   Credit cards: Credit cards allow you to spend money using a line of credit and pay the balance on a monthly basis. Credit cards can offer rewards points, cash back, and purchase protection. As with debit cards, nearly every online merchant accepts credit cards. However, it’s possible to spend an amount you can’t afford to pay back later. If you fall behind on payments, you can incur high interest fees and wind up with significant credit card debt.

•   Third-party payment services: Third-party payment apps like PayPal and Venmo allow you to link your checking account, debit card, or credit card to make purchases online without extra fees. These apps guard your personal information by keeping your payment details private from merchants. They may also offer features like buyer protection and the ability to split payments with friends.

•   Gift cards: Gift cards are prepaid cards loaded with a specific denomination that you can use to make purchases at a particular retailer or group of retailers. They are a convenient alternative to using a checking account for online shopping, especially if you want to give a gift or if you have a specific retailer in mind. They usually come in specific increments, such as $10, $25, $50, and so on.

•   Government benefits: If you receive the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) for food, you’ll get an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) account to hold the funds. Grocery stores and other retailers, including Walmart, Meijer, Instacart, and Aldi, accept EBT as a form of online payment.

Recommended: Pros and Cons of Using a Debit Card Online

Opening a Checking Account With SoFi

Paying online with a checking account is a viable way to make purchases on websites that accept this method. This technique can help prevent overspending and reduce fees, but it may not always be available and can be less convenient than other forms of payment, including debit cards and credit cards. As a result, it’s important to check which payment methods an online business takes and decide which one is best for your financial circumstances.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.


Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

What can you purchase online with your account and routing number?

If you have the account and routing number for your checking account, you can make purchases with online retailers that accept this form of payment. Because every retailer has its own payment policies, you will need to check their website to see which forms of payment they take.

Where can you pay online with a checking account?

You can pay online with a checking account with any retailer that accepts it as a method of payment, such as Amazon and Walmart. However, some retailers only accept debit cards, credit cards, and payment apps.

Can you pay online with your account and routing number?

You can pay online with your account and routing number if the online retailer accepts a checking account for payment. Many retailers don’t accept bank accounts for payment, so paying by debit card, credit card, payment app, or gift card might be necessary.


Photo credit: iStock/Milan Markovic

SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

*Awards or rankings from NerdWallet are not indicative of future success or results. This award and its ratings are independently determined and awarded by their respective publications.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

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