What Does Flood Insurance Cover?

What Does Flood Insurance Cover?

Flood insurance is designed to help homeowners, renters, and business owners cover losses caused by a flood. You can buy it to protect a building, the possessions in that building, or both.

Most standard homeowners policies don’t cover flood damage. So this separate insurance coverage is your best option for repairing or replacing property after rising water rises enters your home. In some areas, mortgage lenders can make buying flood insurance mandatory. Even if your lender doesn’t require flood insurance, you may want to consider it.

Read on for information that can help you decide if a flood policy should be part of your insurance coverage.

What Is Flood Insurance?

According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), just one inch of floodwater can cause up to $25,000 in damage. And that damage probably won’t be covered by your homeowners or renters insurance. You can, however, purchase a standalone flood insurance policy to help cover your losses.

A flood insurance policy is meant to cover losses directly caused by flooding or, as FEMA describes it, “an excess of water on land that is normally dry, affecting two or more acres of land or two or more properties.”

If your sewer backed up after heavy rainfall, or rising inland or tidal waters flooded your property, the damage would likely be covered by flood insurance. But if the backup wasn’t caused by flooding, the damage wouldn’t be covered by flood insurance. (Whether it’s covered by your homeowners insurance depends on your individual policy.)

Most people get their flood policy through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which is managed by FEMA and works with a network of insurance companies across the country. But some private insurance companies also offer their own flood policies, which are not government-backed.

Recommended: Mortgage & Homeowners Insurance Definitions

What Is Included in Standard Flood Insurance?

The NFIP offers two types of flood insurance coverage: one that covers buildings and another that covers the owner’s or renter’s personal contents.

A policy purchased through the NFIP can reimburse up to $250,000 in building damage and typically covers:

•   Foundation walls, anchoring systems, and staircases

•   Detached garages

•   Electrical and plumbing systems

•   Furnaces and water heaters

•   Fuel tanks, well water tanks and pumps, and solar energy equipment

•   Appliances, including refrigerators, stoves, and built-in dishwashers

•   Permanently installed cabinets, paneling, and bookcases

•   Permanently installed carpeting and window blinds

An NFIP policy can provide up to $100,000 in personal property damage, and typically covers:

•   Personal belongings, such as clothing, furniture, and electronic equipment (TVs, computers, etc.)

•   Valuables (like original artwork and furs) up to $2,500

•   Portable and window air conditioners

•   Washers and dryers

•   Microwave ovens

•   Carpets that may not be included under building coverage

•   Curtains and other window coverings

Recommended: A Guide to All Things Insurance

What Doesn’t Flood Insurance Cover?

There are a few things NFIP flood insurance doesn’t cover, even if the damage is directly caused by flooding. Items that aren’t covered include:

•   Any property that’s outside the insured building (such as a well, septic system, deck or patio, fences, seawall, hot tub or pool, and landscaping)

•   Cars and most other self-propelled vehicles and their parts

•   Cash, coins, precious metals, stock certificates, and other valuable paperwork

•   Damage from mold or mildew that could have been prevented by the property owner

Flood insurance also doesn’t cover costs incurred if you have to live in temporary housing because of damage to your property. Unfortunately, neither will the “loss of use coverage” you may have through your homeowners policy. (Loss of use coverage pays those expenses only when the reason you’ve been displaced is covered by your homeowners policy.)

What Does Flood Insurance Cover in the Basement?

The NFIP’s coverage for flood damage in the basement is limited to some specific (usually permanent or attached) items and cleanup. Some examples of what should be covered include:

•   Central air conditioners

•   Fuel tanks and the fuel in them

•   Furnaces and water heaters

•   Sump pumps, heat pumps, and well water tanks and pumps

•   Electrical outlets, switches, and junction and circuit breaker boxes

•   Unfinished drywall for walls and ceilings

•   Attached stairways and staircases

•   Foundation elements and anchoring systems required for building support

Most personal property kept in the basement isn’t covered, including clothing, computers, TVs, and furniture.

Where Can You Get Flood Insurance?

Federal flood insurance isn’t sold directly by the federal government. Instead, you can buy NFIP policies through private insurance companies, under what’s known as a Write Your Own (WYO) program.

The NFIP partners with more than 50 insurance companies, so you may be able to work with the same insurance agent or broker who helped you purchase your home and auto policies to get flood coverage.

You can get help finding an NFIP provider online at floodsmart.gov/ flood-insurance-provider or by calling the NFIP at 877-336-2627. You also can also check into any private, non-government-backed flood insurance policies that are offered in your area.

You may want to look at including flood insurance as part of your overall personal insurance planning. Don’t wait until you hear predictions of a storm heading your way to start inquiring about a policy, though. There is typically a 30-day waiting period for a flood insurance policy to go into effect.

How Much Does Flood Insurance Cost?

Like most insurance, the cost of a flood policy can depend on the coverage type (building and/or personal contents), the size and age of the building covered, the risk level in your location (based on your flood zone), and other factors, including whether you’re buying a private or NFIP policy.

According to a 2022 Forbes Advisor analysis of flood insurance rates, the average cost of one year of coverage with an NFIP policy is $995. And though that’s not nearly as much as the average cost of a homeowners policy, it can still be a hit to many household budgets.

You may be able to lower the cost of a flood policy by choosing a higher deductible. You can also elevate your home’s electrical panels, heating and cooling systems, and other utilities so they’re less vulnerable to water damage.

For renters, the NFIP offers contents-only policies for as low as $99 annually.

You can also look for a competitive quote on a private flood policy that isn’t backed by FEMA and the NFIP. Just make sure you’re getting a fair price from a stable company that is capable of paying out claims in the event of a major flood.

When Is Flood Insurance Required?

If you have a government-backed mortgage and your home or business is in a high-risk flood area, you are required to have flood insurance. If you don’t have a government-backed loan, your lender may still require that you purchase a flood policy. Even lenders in moderate- to low-risk locations may make it a loan requirement. (You may also be interested in Is Homeowners Insurance Required to Buy a Home?)

Who Should Buy Flood Insurance?

Knowing your designated flood zone can help you decide whether you want to prioritize purchasing flood insurance. You can find your zone by entering your address at the FEMA Flood Map Service Center at MSC.FEMA.gov.

Structures in zones A and V are at the highest risk, while those in zones B, C, and X are considered at moderate to minimal risk. Keep in mind, though, that you can still experience flood damage even if you don’t live in a high-risk zone. According to NFIP data, more than 20% of all insurance claims come from moderate- to low-risk zones.

If you’re moving to a new area where flood insurance isn’t required, you may want to speak with your real estate agent or neighbors about the area’s history and potential for flooding.

How Much Flood Insurance Do You Need?

In many ways, shopping for flood insurance is similar to how you buy homeowners insurance: Calculating how much you’ll need will depend on what you plan to protect and what it might cost to replace if it’s destroyed.

In fact, your homeowners insurance company may give you an idea of what it might cost to rebuild or repair your home if it’s damaged. Then you can add on the value of your furnishings and other personal possessions to decide how much flood insurance you need. (If you’re a renter, you can purchase a policy that covers only your belongings.)

Remember, there are limits to how much coverage you can get through an NFIP policy ($250,000 for a building and $100,000 for the contents). If your needs go beyond those limits, you may want to consider buying excess flood insurance through a private flood policy.

The Takeaway

Most homeowners insurance policies don’t cover flood damage, which can leave a big gap when it comes to protecting your home and belongings. Purchasing a separate flood insurance policy can help fill that gap, and it can be an important part of your overall insurance planning. Flood policies can cover the building itself, its contents, or both. Make sure you understand what isn’t covered by your policy, such as personal belongings stored in the basement or outside. An average flood insurance policy for homeowners costs $995 a year.

How can SoFi help? While we don’t offer flood insurance, we have teamed up with top carriers to help you find reliable homeowners and renters insurance online. With SoFi, you can easily search for the coverage you need at a price you can afford.

Let SoFi help you find the protection you need for your home, life, and vehicle.

FAQ

What losses are covered by flood insurance?

A flood insurance policy covers direct physical losses caused by a flood. That could mean repairing or replacing your home, or the furnishings and other belongings in your home, or both.

How do I know if I’m in a flood zone?

Everyone is in a flood zone, but some areas are at a higher risk than others. You can find your zone by entering your address at the FEMA Flood Map Service Center at MSC.FEMA.gov.

Is flooding covered by homeowners insurance?

Some types of water damage are covered by a standard homeowners policy, but flooding usually is not.


Photo credit: iStock/onurdongel

SoFi offers customers the opportunity to reach the following Insurance Agents:
Home & Renters: Lemonade Insurance Agency (LIA) is acting as the agent of Lemonade Insurance Company in selling this insurance policy, in which it receives compensation based on the premiums for the insurance policies it sells.

Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
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Work From Home Jobs With Flexible Hours for Moms

Work From Home Jobs With Flexible Hours for Moms

In the not-too-distant past, when couples had kids, one partner stayed home — and essentially gave up their career for a while. Today, however, more companies are accommodating remote work and flexible hours for an expanding roster of jobs. Stay-at-home parents may be surprised to see that the industry they left behind is now open to hiring them back on a part-time or freelance basis.

We’ve rounded up the most promising work-from-home jobs with flexible hours across a range of occupations. Some require a relevant degree or specialized training or experience, while others are more open to motivated generalists.

Recommended: Should I Sell My House Now or Wait?

Is Working From Home Here To Stay?

Companies are finally accepting that work-from-home situations can be beneficial for businesses and workers. Today, more than half of American workers have the ability to work from home at least one day per week, according to McKinsey’s American Opportunity Survey. And 35% are able to work from home the entire week. “Flexible work is no longer a temporary pandemic response but an enduring feature of the modern working world,” the report states.

This is great news for the millions of Americans who can’t swing a full-time office job, from job-seeking retirees to self-described “antisocial” folks.

That said, telework is unlikely to be available for occupations that have a need for workers at a jobsite, including trade jobs. But many more professional roles can be fulfilled by remote workers.

Recommended: Does Net Worth Include Home Equity?

Are WFH Jobs and Remote Jobs the Same?

WFH and remote jobs may be different in how they’re set up. Some companies define “work from home” (WFH) as a temporary situation, like working from home on a Friday but coming into the office other days of the week. The expectation for remote workers is that they define their own workday and may never need to go into the office.

Recommended: Job Transition Tips

Do All Part-Time Jobs Have Flexible Hours?

No. Some part-time jobs have set hours rather than flexible hours. It all depends on what your employer requires. If you need flexible hours (or would prefer set hours), be sure to communicate that with the hiring manager.

13 WFH Jobs With Flexible Hours for Moms

If you need or want to work from home, there’s never been a better time. Take a look at these 13 occupations with the most remote opportunities, per the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Some may pay hourly vs. salaried, but all pay considerably higher than minimum wage.

We hope this list will inspire you to pursue a job with flexible hours that previously might have shut you out.

1. Market Research Analyst / Marketing Specialist

Median annual wage: $63,920

Expected job growth: Much better than average

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

What they do: Market research analysts study consumer behavior and preferences, then make recommendations to businesses that promise greater profitability. They also research a company’s position in the marketplace relative to their competitors.

2. Marketing Manager

Median annual wage: $135,030

Expected job growth: Faster than average

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

What they do: Marketing managers create interest in a product or service using advertisements, promotions, and other marketing tactics. They develop pricing strategies and negotiate advertising contracts. This is the highest paying job on our list.

Recommended: What is The Difference Between Transunion and Equifax?

3. Fundraiser

Median annual wage: $60,660

Expected job growth: Much faster than average

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

What they do: Fundraisers organize events and campaigns to help raise money for an organization. They may work for political campaigns, nonprofits, or educational institutions.

4. Compensation and Benefits Manager

Median annual wage: $127,530

Expected job growth: Slower than average

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

What they do: Compensation and benefits managers administer an organization’s salary and insurance plans for employees. They analyze market trends to determine competitive pay and perks that attract and retain talent.

5. Claims Adjuster / Examiner / Investigator

Median annual wage: $65,080

Expected job growth: Decline

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

What they do: Claims adjusters, examiners, and investigators are responsible for processing an insurance’s company’s claims. They determine if the claim is eligible and how much should be paid out. It’s one of the few jobs that don’t require college.

6. Financial and Investment Analyst

Median annual wage: $91,580

Expected job growth: Faster than average

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

What they do: Financial and investment analysts help businesses and individuals make decisions to become more profitable. Analysts may work on the “buy-side” (for companies with a lot of money to invest), the “sell-side” (for agents who sell stocks and bonds), or the media. They may specialize in a particular area or market, like tech or energy. The financial sector tends to have very good entry level salaries.

7. Accountant / Auditor

Median annual wage: $77,250

Expected job growth: Average

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

What they do: Accountants and auditors are responsible for preparing accurate financial reports, analyzing the financial health of an organization, and filing taxes. They may make suggestions to a business about how to reduce costs, eliminate inefficiencies, and improve profitability. Accounting has long been considered a good job for introverts.

8. Computer Systems Analyst

Median annual wage: $99,270

Expected job growth: Faster than average

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

What they do: Computer systems analysts help businesses become more efficient with specific computer technologies. They analyze the cost and benefits of IT systems and help managers decide which are best for their organization. They are sometimes called systems architects and usually specialize in a specific type of computer system.

9. Network and Computer Systems Administrator

Median annual wage: $80,600

Expected job growth: Slower than average

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

What they do: Network and computer systems administrators are responsible for the day-to-day operation of computer networks for an organization. They may install, test, make upgrades and repairs, and train users. They manage servers, desktops, and mobile equipment. Much of this can be done remotely.

10. Computer User Support Specialist

Median annual wage: $49,770

Expected job growth: As fast as average

Requirements: Some college

What they do: Computer support specialists help users with computer network problems. They also maintain existing network systems. The potential as a part time job with flexible hours for students is there.

11. Sales Rep, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific

Median annual wage: $94,840

Expected job growth: Average

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

What they do: Sales representatives with technical or scientific knowledge can make money by selling products or services for an employer. They explain the features of the product and help the customer understand how the product can benefit them. They negotiate prices, prepare sales contracts, and submit orders for processing. They maintain a relationship with the client for ongoing business exchanges.

12. Advertising Sales Agent

Median annual wage: $52,340

Expected job growth: Decline

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

What they do: Advertising sales agents sell advertising space to businesses and individuals. They build relationships with clients and explain the design, contracts, and cost of the ad space.

13. Public Relations Specialist

Median annual wage: $62,800

Expected job growth: Faster than average

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

What they do: Public relations specialists are responsible for maintaining a positive image for their clients. They do this by preparing information for the media, running social media programs, and preparing clients for interviews with the media.

Recommended: Jobs That Pay Off Student Loans

The Takeaway

There’s never been a better time to be a remote worker. Whether you’re an expert in your field or need to make a job transition, remote jobs with flexible hours are now possible for more than half of workers. Sometimes, it’s just a matter of knowing where to look for the jobs and finding the right match for your skills.

When you’re earning the big bucks, a free spending app can help you accomplish your goals. Whether that’s tracking your budget, seeing your credit score, or setting savings goals, it’s incredibly helpful to have an app that can show you the big picture when it comes to your money.

SoFi Insights connects all of your accounts in one place.

FAQ

What kind of job can I do as a stay-at-home mom?

Any job that can be done remotely is one you can do as a stay-at-home mom. Many well-paying jobs can be done remotely, such as legal work, marketing, sales, and more.

What is the best part-time job for a housewife?

The best part-time job for a housewife is one that fulfills you and helps support your family at the same time. Look for industries, occupations, companies, and individuals that are supportive of your goals and needs. In the competitive labor market we’re in now, you can ask for things that are important to you, such as a flexible schedule or remote work.


Photo credit: iStock/lechatnoir

SoFi’s Insights tool offers users the ability to connect both in-house accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score provided to you is a Vantage Score® based on TransUnion™ (the “Processing Agent”) data.
Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
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What Is the Minimum Credit Score Needed for a Credit Card?

There is no minimum credit score needed for a credit card. Even borrowers with poor credit (a score of 300) or no credit card at all can qualify for some credit cards. However, options for bad-credit borrowers are limited and usually come with a high annual percentage rate (APR) and fees. Borrowers with no credit or poor credit may also only qualify for secured credit cards.

By boosting your credit score, you’ll have more options for credit cards with better rates, fees, and even rewards, bonuses, and perks. In this piece, we’ll review:

•   How your credit score affects credit card approval

•   The minimum credit score for a credit card

•   How your credit score is calculated — and how you can improve it

•   Credit cards for borrowers with fair, bad, and no credit

Recommended: Can You Buy Crypto With a Credit Card?

How Your Credit Score Affects Your Odds of Credit Card Approval

A good or excellent credit score increases your odds of credit card approval. But if you have a bad credit score, you’re not out of luck. Some credit card issuers have options for borrowers with no credit history or extremely low credit scores.

Before applying for a credit card, it’s a good idea to read the fine print for that specific card. Often, credit card companies will list their minimum credit score requirements for the card. If you’re at the bottom of the stated range, you may have a harder time qualifying.

To avoid getting declined (and having an unnecessary hard inquiry on your credit report), you may want to consider a less competitive credit card that you’re more likely to be approved for based on your credit score.

Cash in on up to $300–and 3% cash back for 365 days.¹

Apply and get approved for the SoFi Credit Card. Then open a bank account with qualifying direct deposits. Some things are just better together.


What Credit Score Do You Need to Get a Credit Card?

While there is no minimum credit score to get a credit card, you’ll need a higher credit score to qualify for the best credit cards available. Typically, travel credit cards and cash-back credit cards are reserved for borrowers with good to excellent credit (670 and above on the FICO scale).

If you have a fair credit score, you might be able to qualify for a decent credit card with a higher annual percentage rate (APR) and limited perks. Experts recommend having at least a 600 credit score to qualify for a standard credit card.

Borrowers with bad credit or no credit at all may be limited to secured credit cards (cards that require a security deposit as collateral), credit-building cards, or high-interest credit cards with high annual fees.

Recommended: How to Avoid Interest On a Credit Card

Tips for Estimating the Credit Score You Need

How can you determine a credit card’s credit score requirements? Here are a few ways to estimate the minimum score you’ll need:

•   Checking the website: Often, the credit card issuer will advertise in plain writing what credit score is required for each of its credit cards.

•   Reading reviews: If the issuer’s website isn’t clear, you may want to check third-party review websites, which often print the recommended credit scores needed for credit cards.

•   Using third-party services. Platforms like Credit Sesame and Credit Karma can predict which credit cards you’ll qualify for with your current credit score — but it’s never guaranteed. Such services also typically offer free credit score monitoring.

•   Getting preapproved. Many credit card issuers offer preapproval for their cards. This means they only initiate a soft pull on your credit report (with no effect on your credit score). A preapproval is not a guaranteed yes; you still have to go through the process, but it can instill more confidence if you’re worried about your chances.

Recommended: Does Checking Your Credit Score Lower Your Rating?

Factors Affecting Your Credit Score

Boosting your credit score is a great way to qualify for more (and better) credit cards. But knowing how to increase your credit score requires that you know what affects your credit score in the first place.

FICO and VantageScore both constantly monitor consumers’ credit and assign them different credit scores based on a consumer’s activity. While the models are similar, each company uses its own proprietary scoring method to calculate credit scores. Both scores range from 300 to 850.

FICO Scoring Method

Your FICO credit score depends on five key factors:

•   Payment history (35%): The largest factor impacting your credit score is your payment history. Making on-time payments not just for loans but for things like rent and utilities will boost your score. Late payments can stay on your credit report for up to seven years.

•   Credit utilization (30%): Using less of the credit available to you can raise your score; on the other hand, maxing out each card in your name every month can lower your score.

•   Credit history (15%): Everything’s better with age, so they say. The length of your credit history plays an important part in your credit score. Responsible credit users should see their scores increase over time.

•   Credit mix (10%): Having a healthy mix of loan types (both installment credit and revolving credit) can boost your score — if managed properly. That means mortgages, auto loans, student loans, personal loans, and credit cards can all help your credit score.

•   New credit applications (10%): When you apply for new credit, lenders will make a hard inquiry on your credit report. Even if you are denied the credit, this inquiry will temporarily lower your credit score, which is how applying for a credit card affects your credit score.

Recommended: When Are Credit Card Payments Due?

VantageScore’s Scoring Method

VantageScore, on the other hand, assigns different factors a value of influence:

•   The most influential factor affecting your VantageScore is payment history, as it is with FICO.

•   Three highly influential factors include the age of credit, type of credit, and credit utilization.

•   A moderately influential factor is the total debt balance you maintain across all loans.

•   The least influential factor is your recent credit activity (opening new accounts, recent hard inquiries, etc.).

Recommended: How Often Does Your Credit Score Update?

Tips for Improving Your Credit Score

Wondering how to improve your credit score to increase your chances of credit card approval? Here are some tips:

•   Understand your credit score: The first step to improving your credit score is knowing how it’s calculated — and knowing what your current credit score is.

•   Make on-time bill payments: Paying bills on time is good for more than just avoiding late fees. It’s also the top factor in determining your FICO score and VantageScore.

•   Decrease your credit utilization: By reducing the amount of purchases on your credit cards — and paying them off in full every month — you’ll decrease your credit utilization, which can boost your credit score.

•   Become an authorized user: If you have no credit history or are repairing bad credit, you may benefit from becoming an authorized user on a loved one’s credit card. If they are responsible with the card, it’s an easy way for you to boost your score without applying for your own card.

•   Keep old cards open: Once you qualify for better credit cards, you may be tempted to close out old accounts. But each of those cards has a credit limit. By keeping the card open but not using it, you decrease your overall credit utilization and keep the average age of your credit higher. The exception: If the card has an annual fee and you’re not using it for anything, it’s probably not worth keeping it open.

•   Only apply for credit cards when you need them: Each time you apply for a credit card, the issuer enacts a hard inquiry on your credit report, which lowers your score. Because of this, it’s a good idea to wait at least six months between credit card applications — and only apply when you need to. Choose your credit card applications wisely.

Recommended: Tips for Using a Credit Card Responsiblya

Getting a Credit Card with Bad Credit

Bad credit is not a death sentence on your chances of getting a credit card. In fact, you can find credit cards on the market designed specifically for people with bad credit. However, such cards typically have high fees and interest rates.

If you’re worried about high fees and rates, a secured credit card for bad credit may be the better option. Some secured credit cards even approve borrowers without conducting a credit check and have no APR. The big difference between a secured vs. unsecured credit card is that secured credit cards require a security deposit, which acts as the card’s credit limit.

Alternatively, bad-credit borrowers may be able to qualify for a retail credit card. While retail credit card credit score requirements vary, many are available to borrowers with limited or bad credit.

Recommended: What is the Average Credit Card Limit?

Getting a Credit Card with Fair Credit

With a fair credit score (580 to 669 per FICO), you won’t qualify for the top rewards credit cards available. That being said, it’s still possible to get approved for an unsecured credit card with no annual fee and limited perks.

Interest rates tend to be higher for those within this credit score range, but if you can pay the card off in full every month, you won’t have to worry about racking up credit card debt. Eventually, you may even improve your credit score enough to graduate to a rewards credit card with a better rate and terms.

Getting a Credit Card with No Credit

What if you have no credit history at all? Believe it or not, you can still qualify for a credit card with no credit history — though your options may be more limited.

Like borrowers with bad credit, you can likely qualify for no-frills secured credit cards if you can come up with the security deposit. Alternatively, borrowers without an established credit history can ask a close friend or family member to be added as an authorized user on their card. There are also credit cards designed for those who are currently enrolled in school.

The Takeaway

While there isn’t a minimum credit score for a credit card, having a good to excellent credit score improves your chances of approval for the top credit cards on the market. If you have a bad credit score or no credit history at all, you may be able to qualify for secured credit cards or credit cards. However, you’ll generally face higher fees and APRs.

If you have good to excellent credit and are looking for a credit card that rewards your purchases, consider the SoFi Credit Card. For a limited time, new credit card holders† who also sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings with direct deposit can start earning 3% cash back rewards on all eligible credit card purchases for 365 days*. Offer ends 12/31/23.

Take advantage of this offer by applying for a SoFi credit card today.

FAQ

Can you get a credit card with limited or no credit history?

Yes, you can get a credit card with limited or no credit history. Borrowers with no history can look for secured credit cards or consider becoming an authorized user on someone else’s credit account. Without credit history, however, you likely will not qualify for low-APR credit cards or rewards credit cards.

Can I get a credit card with a score of 600?

Yes, with a credit score of 600 (in the fair credit range), you may qualify for basic credit cards that offer limited perks, if any. You likely will not be able to qualify for a rewards credit card. However, credit card issuers may at least approve you for an unsecured credit card, though likely with a higher APR.

What is the easiest card to get approved for?

If you have no credit history (or a limited credit history) or a bad credit score, the easiest card to get approved for is typically a secured credit card. Secured credit cards present lower risk to credit card issuers because borrowers must make a security deposit that serves as collateral.


Photo credit: iStock/Antonio_Diaz

SoFi cardholders earn 2% unlimited cash back rewards when redeemed to save, invest, or pay down eligible SoFi debt. Cardholders earn 1% cash back rewards when redeemed for a statement credit.1
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
The SoFi Credit Card is issued by The Bank of Missouri (TBOM) (“Issuer”) pursuant to license by Mastercard® International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.
1See Rewards Details at SoFi.com/card/rewards.
Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s
website
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For a limited time, new credit card holders† who also sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings with direct deposit can start earning 3% cash back rewards on all eligible credit card purchases for 365 days*. Offer ends 12/31/23.

Take advantage of this offer by applying for a SoFi credit card today.


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Guide to Checking Your Credit Card Approval Odds

Figuring out whether you will get approved for a credit card is seemingly simpler now with credit card approval odds calculators. These tools can offer guidance, highlighting credit cards with high approval odds in your favor. However, they are not always reliable.

Still, learning how to leverage the approval odds information that these tools provide can be helpful. You can use the insights to make yourself a more desirable borrower for credit card companies, thus increasing your future approval odds.

What Are Credit Card Approval Odds?

Credit card approval odds inform you of the likelihood that you’d get approved for a particular credit card. How these approval odds are determined, including which details are assessed, can vary between services and card issuers.

For example, a credit card approval odds calculator might suggest that, based on your credit score and income, you have an 80% chance of getting approved for a credit card. It might also offer you a few credit cards with high approval odds to explore.

Cash in on up to $300–and 3% cash back for 365 days.¹

Apply and get approved for the SoFi Credit Card. Then open a bank account with qualifying direct deposits. Some things are just better together.


Checking Your Credit Card Approval Odds

Using a credit card approval odds calculator offers a glimpse of your approval chances, but not a promise. That’s because a credit card company or credit card marketplace can’t provide a 100% assurance of your approval without going through a formal underwriting process.

Underwriting is the step where a lender or issuer evaluates your credit portfolio and application details (like existing debt and income) to calculate whether it would be a risk to loan credit to you. Since this process can only happen after an application is submitted, a tool that states you have high approval odds doesn’t mean your eventual approval is guaranteed.

Prequalifying for a Credit Card Approval

There are a couple of ways to obtain a pre-screened credit card to gauge your approval odds: Receiving a pre-qualification offer or requesting a pre-qualification from a credit card issuer.

Using a Prescreened Offer

Based on your general information from the credit bureaus, card issuers might send you an unsolicited prescreened offer stating that you might be qualified for its credit card.

At this step in the process, the card company has only looked at limited markers, like whether you’ve met its minimum credit score requirement. It hasn’t performed a hard credit check, nor evaluated your existing debt or income to base an approval on. However, if you receive a pre-qualification offer, this can be a positive sign that your approval odds are better than if you hadn’t received it.

Checking the Card Issuer’s Website

You don’t always have to cross your fingers in hopes that a card issuer will give you a prescreened offer. Some credit card issuers offer a pre-screening form that you can fill out to see if you’re pre-qualified for its card. If your preferred card doesn’t let you request a pre-qualification, you might find more insight on the issuer’s website about what’s required for approval.

While you’re on the card issuer’s site, it’s helpful to review its response timelines so you can track your pre-qualification or application progress. This includes the timeline for an application decision, as well as how long it takes to get a credit card if you’re approved.

What To Do if You Prequalify

If you prequalify for a credit card, you can choose to submit an application. Doing so will require a hard credit inquiry before a decision is made, which can temporarily have an effect on your credit score.

Additionally, you can continue shopping around for different cards to see if another product offers a lower interest rate or better incentives.

Recommended: How to Avoid Interest On a Credit Card

What To Do if You Don’t Prequalify

If you don’t pre-qualify for a credit card, you can proceed in a few ways:

•   Hold off on getting a new card. Too many hard credit inquiries might flag you as a high-risk borrower who’s reliant on credit. If you’ve recently had multiple inquiries on your credit, consider waiting a couple of months before re-applying for a new card.

•   Work on your credit score. All card issuers look at your credit score to see if it meets its minimum requirement. A higher credit score is a positive indicator that you’re a responsible borrower.

•   Apply for a secured credit card. A secured credit card is a credit-building card in which you deposit money or collateral in a certain amount. This amount acts as your credit limit.

•   Appeal the decision. If you applied for a credit card and were denied, the issuer must legally inform you of the reason for the denial. If you can provide more information that might sway the issuer in your favor, you can ask them to reexamine your application.

Recommended: Tips for Using a Credit Card Responsibly

Tips for Improving the Likelihood of Approval

Whether you’re getting a credit card for the first time or adding a new card to your rotation, there are a few steps you can take to improve your approval odds.

Reviewing Your Credit Report

Your credit report gives credit card issuers a comprehensive view of your borrowing habits to date. Since it’s a highly scrutinized factor when approving applications, review your credit report before submitting an application.

Check that all accounts, their statuses, and the amounts are accurate. If you spot an account that looks outdated or incorrect, reach out to the credit bureaus immediately to dispute it.

Taking a Look at Your Credit Score

In addition to ensuring your credit report is accurate, evaluate where your credit score stands today. Credit scores are the most common credit card requirements that influence your approval odds. For instance, if a card issuer explicitly states that its minimum credit score required is 720, but your score is 650, your credit card approval odds might be low.

Recommended: Does Applying For a Credit Card Hurt Your Credit Score?

Minimizing Your Debt

Keep your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio as low as possible. Credit issuers use this ratio as a way to determine whether you can afford to pay back potential purchases made on the card. The ratio is based on your aggregate monthly debt amounts divided by your gross monthly income.

Stating All of Your Income

As mentioned above, your income is one of multiple factors used to determine your credit card approval odds. A higher income can reduce your DTI ratio, making you a less risky customer to extend credit to.

You can include various types of income sources on your application. This might include your salary from your full-time job, earnings from a side gig, Social Security benefit payouts, and alimony.

Managing Payment History and Credit Utilization

Staying on top of your existing loan and credit card payments keeps your credit score healthy. This means paying at least the minimum amount due, and making those payments on time every month.

Additionally, be aware of how much of your total credit limit you’re using, compared to how much credit you have access to. This ratio is called your credit utilization ratio. There’s no golden credit utilization ratio to keep in mind, according to FICO, but the lower it is, the better.

Recommended: When Are Credit Card Payments Due?

Comparing Cards Carefully

With so many credit card products on the market, choosing a credit card that suits your borrowing needs and qualifications can help you find the right card.

Ensure you’re comparing credit cards with the same credit card features between different cards to accurately determine their pros and cons. Some considerations to make when comparing credit cards include:

•   APRs. The annual percentage rate, or APR, is how much you’ll pay in interest if you carry a balance on the card. The lower the interest rate, the better.

•   Balance transfer costs. Some issuers offer a zero-interest balance transfer promotion for a limited period, while others don’t. Similarly, some credit cards charge an additional balance transfer fee.

•   Penalty APRs. If your account becomes delinquent, some card issuers impose a higher penalty APR on your existing balances and future transactions. Make sure you understand how a credit card works and which rules apply.

•   Fees. Certain cards charge an annual fee just for the privilege of carrying the card. This fee is in addition to interest charges you might pay for rolling over a balance, month over month.

•   Rewards program. If you’re after credit card rewards, compare the details of each card’s program. For example, look at whether rewards points or miles are tiered or offered for specific categories, or if there’s a flat rewards rate for all purchases.

•   Incentives. You might encounter special promotions, like a welcome bonus or promotional 0% APR. These added perks should factor into your decision.

Recommended: What is a Charge Card?

The Takeaway

Although a credit card approval odds calculator or tool can offer broad guidance about whether you’ll be approved, it doesn’t replace a card issuer’s underwriting criteria. The credit card company relies on its own underwriting team to ultimately decide whether your application is approved. This decision is based on the specific information on your application and your creditworthiness.

If you’re ready to explore a cash-back rewards card, the SoFi Credit Card offers rewards at a generous rate. For a limited time, new credit card holders† who also sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings with direct deposit can start earning 3% cash back rewards on all eligible credit card purchases for 365 days*. Offer ends 12/31/23.

Take advantage of this offer by applying for a SoFi credit card today.

FAQ

Does getting rejected for a credit card hurt my credit?

A credit card pre-approval rejection doesn’t hurt your credit since pre-approvals typically involve a soft credit check. However, if you move forward with a credit card application that involves a hard credit inquiry, your credit score might temporarily drop, regardless of whether you were approved or denied.

Are credit card approval odds accurate?

Generally, credit card approval odds calculators offer guidance toward credit cards with good approval odds. However, they don’t provide a 100% guarantee that you’ll be approved. There have been reported cases of tools claiming that a consumer has high approval odds with a card, only to get denied upon applying. The card issuer is the only entity that can accurately say whether you’re approved for a credit card.

How can I improve my credit card approval odds?

The best way to get good approval odds for credit cards is to minimize high-risk borrowing practices. One way to achieve this is by improving your credit score. Keep your credit balances low, make timely monthly payments, maintain long-standing credit accounts, and avoid opening multiple new lines of credit in a short period.

How do you guarantee credit card approval?

There’s no way to absolutely guarantee credit card approval to any particular card. Card issuers base their decisions on a number of factors, like your credit history, credit score, income, credit utilization, debt-to-income ratio, and more.


Photo credit: iStock/akinbostanci

SoFi cardholders earn 2% unlimited cash back rewards when redeemed to save, invest, or pay down eligible SoFi debt. Cardholders earn 1% cash back rewards when redeemed for a statement credit.1
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s
website
.

The SoFi Credit Card is issued by The Bank of Missouri (TBOM) (“Issuer”) pursuant to license by Mastercard® International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.
1See Rewards Details at SoFi.com/card/rewards.
†SOFI RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY OR DISCONTINUE PRODUCTS AND BENEFITS PROSPECTIVELY BASED ON MARKET CONDITIONS AND BORROWER ELIGIBILITY. Your eligibility for a SoFi Credit Card Account or a subsequently offered product or service is subject to the final determination by The Bank of Missouri (“TBOM”) (“Issuer”), as issuer, pursuant to license by Mastercard® International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated. Please allow up to 30 days from the date of submission to process your application. The card offer referenced in this communication is only available to individuals who are at least 18 years of age (or of legal age in your state of residence), and who reside in the United States.

*You will need to maintain a qualifying Direct Deposit every month with SoFi Checking and Savings in order to continue to receive this promotional cash back rate. Qualifying Direct Deposits are defined as deposits from enrolled member’s employer, payroll, or benefits provider via ACH deposit. Deposits that are not from an employer (such as check deposits; P2P transfers such as from PayPal or Venmo, etc.; merchant transactions such as from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.; and bank ACH transfers not from employers) do not qualify for this promotion. A maximum of 36,000 rewards points can be earned from this limited-time offer. After the promotional period ends or once you have earned the maximum points offered by this promotion, your cash back earning rate will revert back to 2%. 36,000 rewards points are worth $360 when redeemed into SoFi Checking and Savings, SoFi Money, SoFi Invest, Crypto, SoFi Personal Loan, SoFi Private Student Loan or Student Loan Refinance and are worth $180 when redeemed as a SoFi Credit Card statement credit.

Promotion Period: The Program will be available from 10/1/22 12:01 AM ET to 12/31/23 11:59PM ET

Eligible Participants: All new members who apply and get approved for the SoFi Credit Card, open a SoFi Checking and Savings account, and set up Direct Deposit transactions (“Direct Deposit”) into their SoFi Checking and Savings account during the promotion period are eligible. All existing SoFi Credit Card members who set up Direct Deposit into a SoFi Checking & Savings account during the promotion period are eligible. All existing SoFi members who have already enrolled in Direct Deposit into a SoFi Checking & Savings account prior to the promotion period, and who apply and get approved for a SoFi Credit Card during the promotion period are eligible. Existing SoFi members who already have the SoFi Credit Card and previously set up Direct Deposit through SoFi Money or SoFi Checking & Savings are not eligible for this promotion.

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What Does Preapproved Mean for a Credit Card?

What Does Preapproved Mean for a Credit Card?

When you get preapproved for a credit card, this means you’ve met initial criteria to receive an offer to get a credit card. In other words, you’ve popped up on a list of consumers that fit the bill for a credit card company’s requirements and are being invited to sign up for a card.

In this piece, we’ll discuss exactly how preapproved credit card offers work, the difference between what preapproved for a credit card means vs. prequalifed, and the pros and cons of preapproved offers.

What Is a Preapproved Credit Card Offer?

As mentioned, a preapproved credit card offer is when a credit card company officially invites you to apply for a specific credit card. Credit card issuers usually use criteria pulled from credit reporting agencies to extend these offers. If you fall within the parameters of the credit card requirements set by the card issuer, then you may receive an offer — either via email, snail mail, or over the phone — to formally apply for approval for the card.

Cash in on up to $300–and 3% cash back for 365 days.¹

Apply and get approved for the SoFi Credit Card. Then open a bank account with qualifying direct deposits. Some things are just better together.


How Do Preapproved Credit Card Offers Work?

While it sounds promising, getting a preapproved credit card offer doesn’t necessarily mean you’re guaranteed to get approved for a credit card. Even if you’re preapproved, you’ll need to properly apply.

When you do, the credit card issuer will look over your application and usually request additional financial and personal information. The credit card company will also check your updated credit report to figure out if your credit still meets the criteria it referred to when it sent you the preapproved offer.

Preapproved vs Prequalified Credit Card Offers

The terms “preapproved” and “prequalified” often are used interchangeably when it comes to prescreened credit card offers. And within the realm of credit cards, they often are one and the same. But in other types of lending, they mean different things.

Prequalified offers are usually requested by you, the consumer. To get prequalified, you typically need to provide basic personal and financial information. During the screening process, the credit card issuer will check your credit. However, it will only conduct a soft pull, which won’t impact your credit score. After reviewing the info you submitted, the credit card company will let you know if you’re likely to get approved.

Preapproval, on the other hand, is when you’re prescreened for offers by the credit card company. These credit companies work with the three major credit reporting agencies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — to come up with a list of consumers that meet their lending criteria.

With both preapproval and prequalification, you’ll still have to submit to a hard credit inquiry and potentially provide additional financial information to actually get approved for the loan product. Keep in mind that unlike a soft inquiry, a hard credit inquiry will temporarily affect your score.

Recommended: Can You Buy Crypto With a Credit Card?

Benefits of a Preapproved Credit Card

Now that you know what preapproved means for a credit card, you may be wondering what the benefits are. In general, these are the upsides of preapproval, whether for a valuable rewards card or a virtual credit card.

Recommended: Can You Buy Crypto With a Credit Card?

Indicates Your Odds of Approval

Perhaps the most obvious benefit of getting preapproved for a credit card is that you’ll have a better sense of how likely you are to ultimately get approved for the card. Although preapproval is not a guarantee of eventual approval, if a credit card issuer has already selected you to apply and your financial situation hasn’t drastically changed, you’re likely within the required parameters to get the card.

Won’t Impact Your Credit Score

One of the major benefits of getting preapproved for a credit card is that it won’t impact your credit score. To get preapproved, the card issuer does a soft pull of your credit. Only if you decide to formally apply for the card will the credit card company do a hard pull of your credit.

Could Allow You To Secure More Competitive Terms

Getting preapproved for a credit card may allow you to secure a lower interest rate than you’d otherwise be able to get. This is because the lender is effectively advertising the card to you in order to get you to apply. Keep in mind, however, that your rates aren’t set until after you formally apply.

Recommended: How to Avoid Interest On a Credit Card

May Provide Access to Better Intro Offers

Another advantage of a preapproved credit card is that it might come with more lucrative perks than what’s more widely advertised to the public. You might be privy to cards with more attractive sign-up bonuses or introductory earnings opportunities. For instance, a cash-back credit card might offer a higher initial earnings rate through preapproval offers.

Could Get a Longer Intro APR for Balance Transfers Cards

For balance transfer credit cards that allow you to transfer your existing debt over to the new card, you might be able to get a lower introductory annual percentage rate (APR) for longer through preapproved offers. This longer introductory period could make it easier to pay off your balance in full before the regular interest rate kicks in.

Easier for You

Because credit card companies have vetted you and know that you’ve passed its criteria, you don’t have to spend time researching cards. Instead, these offers are coming to you. Still, when choosing a credit card, it doesn’t hurt to take a look around to make sure this is truly the right fit for you.

Drawbacks of a Preapproved Credit Card

While there are benefits of preapproved credit card offers, there are drawbacks to them as well.

Might Not Be the Best Card for You

While you don’t have to jump through the same hoops as you would looking for a credit card on your own, the credit card you’re preapproved may not be the right one for you. It might be a good idea to spend some time doing your own research and understanding differences in how credit cards work even if you do get preapproved.

Could Get Flooded With Unwanted Offers

Preapproval offers may lead to getting a lot of unsolicited emails, mail, or phone calls. Especially if you’re not in the market for a new credit card, you could feel inundated with offers you don’t necessarily want or need.

Potential for Theft of Personal Information

There’s a chance that a would-be identity thief can intercept your prescreened offer and get ahold of your name and mailing address. The good news is that prescreened offers are one of the least likely forms of identity theft. Plus, an identity thief would likely need information beyond what’s included in a preapproval offer.

Data Privacy Issues

This is not very common, but there’s a chance that your name, address, and other personal information are stored in databases for consumers that qualify for prescreened offers. This means that in the instance of a data breach, your information could be accessed.

Temptation to Open More Cards

Receiving preapproved offers for credit cards may tempt you to open a new credit card you don’t necessarily need, especially if the preapproval offer includes a lucrative sign-up bonus or an extended introductory APR offer. Especially if you’re already set with your lineup of credit cards, this might entice you to take on more cards than you can comfortably manage.

When You May Need Credit Card Preapproval

You might want to receive a preapproved credit card offer if you’re in the market for a new credit card and would rather not go through the full process of researching credit cards. As you know you already meet certain lending criteria, the odds of getting approved for a card are improved.

Keep in mind, however, that you don’t need to get credit card preapproval in order to apply for a credit card. If you’re getting a credit card for the first time and have a limited credit history, for instance, you’re likely not going to get so many preapproval offers — but that doesn’t mean you can’t still try applying.

Recommended: What is the Average Credit Card Limit?

Tips for Getting a Preapproved Credit Card Offer

If you’d like to get preapproved offers, you’ll want to opt in by visiting OptOutPrescreen.com . From there, you can choose to get these offers through the mail, email, or via phone.

Instead of waiting for offers to come to you, you can also get preapproved by visiting a credit card issuer’s website and applying for prequalification. This typically requires providing basic personal and financial information.

Recommended: How Long It Takes to Get a Credit Card

Tips for Improving Your Chances of Preapproval

While you can still get preapproved for offers with not-so-great credit, you’ll get offers with the most favorable terms and rates with a strong credit score. To keep your credit score game strong and thus improve your chances of improval, make sure to do the following:

•   Avoid late payments

•   Keep your credit utilization rate low

•   Aim to keep cards open

•   Don’t apply for too many new accounts

•   Maintain a diverse mix of different forms of credit

Recommended: When Are Credit Card Payments Due?

How Does a Preapproved Credit Card Impact Your Credit Score?

A preapproved offer for a credit card doesn’t impact your credit score. As we talked about, lenders will do a soft pull of your score, which doesn’t affect your score.

But if you decide to apply for a card, the credit card issuer will do a hard pull of your credit. This will most likely ding your score, though generally only temporarily.

Recommended: When Are Credit Card Payments Due?

Opting Out of Preapproved Credit Cards

If you don’t want to get flooded by preapproval offers, you can decide to opt out. Visit the website OptOutPrescreen.com and follow the simple steps outlined on the website to do so. You then won’t be included on lists to get considered for preapproval for five years.

Recommended: Does Applying For a Credit Card Hurt Your Credit Score?

The Takeaway

A preapproved offer for a credit card means you’ve met certain lending criteria to most likely get approved for a specific card. You’ll still need to officially apply to secure approval though. But if your credit score and financial history are the same as when you initially received the offer, there’s a high likelihood you’ll get approved.

Looking to add another credit card? The SoFi Credit Card allows you to submit a request for prequalification. Plus, you can earn generous cash-back rewards through your spending with the card. For a limited time, new credit card holders† who also sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings with direct deposit can start earning 3% cash back rewards on all eligible credit card purchases for 365 days*. Offer ends 12/31/23.

Take advantage of this offer by applying for a SoFi credit card today.

FAQ

How long does it take to get a credit card if you are preapproved?

It depends on the credit card and credit card company. If you’re preapproved for a card, you’ll still need to officially apply. If you do get approved for a card, it could take anywhere from five business days to two weeks for your card to arrive in the mail.

Can you get denied after preapproval?

In some cases, yes. For instance, if your credit or financial situation changed between the time you received a preapproved offer and when you applied, you might get denied.

Can I get a credit card if I am not preapproved or I don’t qualify for a credit card?

Yes, you don’t need to get preapproved for a credit card; it simply nixes a few steps and boosts your odds of getting a card. However, you will need to qualify for a credit card to get it. This happens if you meet the credit card company’s lending criteria. If you do, you’ll have a chance of getting a particular credit card.

Should I still apply if I am not preapproved for a credit card?

Just because you aren’t preapproved doesn’t mean you won’t be able to get a particular credit card. Spend some time doing your homework to figure out which cards are a good fit for your needs and financial situation. When choosing a credit card, it’s important to check the rates, credit limits, and fees.


Photo credit: iStock/akinbostanci

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s
website
.

The SoFi Credit Card is issued by The Bank of Missouri (TBOM) (“Issuer”) pursuant to license by Mastercard® International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.
1See Rewards Details at SoFi.com/card/rewards.
SoFi cardholders earn 2% unlimited cash back rewards when redeemed to save, invest, or pay down eligible SoFi debt. Cardholders earn 1% cash back rewards when redeemed for a statement credit.1
†SOFI RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY OR DISCONTINUE PRODUCTS AND BENEFITS PROSPECTIVELY BASED ON MARKET CONDITIONS AND BORROWER ELIGIBILITY. Your eligibility for a SoFi Credit Card Account or a subsequently offered product or service is subject to the final determination by The Bank of Missouri (“TBOM”) (“Issuer”), as issuer, pursuant to license by Mastercard® International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated. Please allow up to 30 days from the date of submission to process your application. The card offer referenced in this communication is only available to individuals who are at least 18 years of age (or of legal age in your state of residence), and who reside in the United States.

*You will need to maintain a qualifying Direct Deposit every month with SoFi Checking and Savings in order to continue to receive this promotional cash back rate. Qualifying Direct Deposits are defined as deposits from enrolled member’s employer, payroll, or benefits provider via ACH deposit. Deposits that are not from an employer (such as check deposits; P2P transfers such as from PayPal or Venmo, etc.; merchant transactions such as from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.; and bank ACH transfers not from employers) do not qualify for this promotion. A maximum of 36,000 rewards points can be earned from this limited-time offer. After the promotional period ends or once you have earned the maximum points offered by this promotion, your cash back earning rate will revert back to 2%. 36,000 rewards points are worth $360 when redeemed into SoFi Checking and Savings, SoFi Money, SoFi Invest, Crypto, SoFi Personal Loan, SoFi Private Student Loan or Student Loan Refinance and are worth $180 when redeemed as a SoFi Credit Card statement credit.

Promotion Period: The Program will be available from 10/1/22 12:01 AM ET to 12/31/23 11:59PM ET

Eligible Participants: All new members who apply and get approved for the SoFi Credit Card, open a SoFi Checking and Savings account, and set up Direct Deposit transactions (“Direct Deposit”) into their SoFi Checking and Savings account during the promotion period are eligible. All existing SoFi Credit Card members who set up Direct Deposit into a SoFi Checking & Savings account during the promotion period are eligible. All existing SoFi members who have already enrolled in Direct Deposit into a SoFi Checking & Savings account prior to the promotion period, and who apply and get approved for a SoFi Credit Card during the promotion period are eligible. Existing SoFi members who already have the SoFi Credit Card and previously set up Direct Deposit through SoFi Money or SoFi Checking & Savings are not eligible for this promotion.

External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.
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