Should I Sell My House? Reasons to Sell (or Wait) in 2021

Should I Sell My House? Reasons to Sell (or Wait) in 2022

With the world having turned upside down over the past year, you may be taking stock of your life and considering major life choices.

Should I change my job?
Should we have another kid?
Should I sell my house and move to another town?

Any large life event is one that should be carefully considered. In this article, we’ll look at whether now is a good time to sell your house by breaking down reasons to sell — and reasons to wait.

Examining the Housing Market in 2022

The coronavirus pandemic brought an unprecedented demand for housing as more people needed houses that would accommodate the shift to working from home as well as kids attending school at home. Also, historically low-interest rates contributed to the sudden demand for housing.

Larger homes in the suburbs became a hot commodity, which raised the pricing for homes nationwide. The median house price rose 14.9% from August 2020 to August 2021. While the initial price hike has cooled a bit, experts believe that prices will still remain higher than normal through 2022.

So to summarize: houses have been selling like hotcakes throughout the pandemic. This could provide a good opportunity to sell your house in some situations…but if you’re selling so you can buy another house, there’s more to dig into in order to answer the question, “should I sell my house now?”

Recommended: Local Housing Market Trends by City

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3 Reasons to Sell Your House

Now could be the smartest time to sell your house, depending on your specific situation. Here are some compelling reasons to sell your house in 2022.

Reason #1: Your House is Worth More Now

As you saw above, houses are now worth significantly more than they were a year ago. This isn’t the norm. If you wait to sell your house, you might see it go down in value from where it is now once demand cools. Do you want to take advantage of this rare opportunity or wait it out?

If, due to the spike in value, you have significant equity built in your home, it could be a great time to cash out and buy something else.

Recommended: How Much is My House Worth?

Reason #2: A Few Minor Repairs Could Increase Value

Even though your home is already likely worth more than it ever has been, you can even get more value out of it if you make common home repairs like replacing pipes or a water heater.

Also consider revamping your kitchen or bathrooms, since those are big influencers for people looking for a new home. Even a fresh coat of paint can breathe new life into your home and make it all the more appealing on an already hot market.

Reason #3: Houses are Selling Fast

Looking to sell quickly? Now’s the time. Houses have, on average, only been on the market for 17 days before selling. Just be prepared to have to move out quickly and make sure you have a plan for where you’ll live next.

3 Reasons You Should Wait to Sell Your House

While there are some great reasons to sell your home right now, it may not be the right time for everyone. Here’s why you might want to wait.

Reason #1: You Can’t Afford to Buy

Selling in a seller’s market is great…but not so great if you need to buy another house, especially if you’re staying in the same area. Buying a house may be cost-prohibitive for you, especially when you factor in closing costs on top of the inflated pricing.

On the other hand, if you live in an expensive area, you could sell your home and move to another more affordable state.

Reason #2: You Owe More Than You Could Sell For

If you are upside down on your mortgage, selling won’t provide a solution. You may have taken out a second mortgage or not have paid enough on your first mortgage to recoup the expense by selling, even at an inflated price. That means you would still owe money on a house you no longer live in after selling.

If this is the case, it may be better to build equity over time before selling.

Reason #3: You’re Not Ready to Make Home Repairs

While making home repairs before selling could help you get more for your home, that doesn’t necessarily mean you have $30,000 laying around to make those improvements. If you know that certain repairs would help you get more for your house but you can’t afford to make them right now, it may be better to wait to sell until you can afford to invest in those home improvements down the road.

Tips for Selling (and Buying) a Home

Before coming up with your own answer to the question of “should I sell my house,” figure out how much you can afford to pay to buy another. If you can only afford a house that’s smaller than your current one, or in a neighborhood, you don’t want to live in, there’s not much point in selling only to end up worse off.

Look at comparables to understand how much homes are selling for in your neighborhood. Go to open houses to see what sort of updates and features sellers are offering so you have an idea of what to do to get your own house ready for sale.

Contemplate being represented by a real estate agent and doing it yourself. With the market so hot right now, you likely won’t need much in the way of promoting your home, and there are some great DIY sites that can cut down on the fees you pay to sell.

If you’re selling the house on your own, invest in professional photos rather than taking your own, and get the house staged (that means more than just removing all the toys and dog beds before a showing!). The better you present your home, the better the price you can command.

Remain patient if you’re also buying. It can feel frustrating to be outbid for what seems like the house of your dreams, but it’s a reality right now. Don’t force a decision — the right house will find you.

Recommended: Home Affordability Calculator

The Takeaway

Selling your house this year could be a smart financial decision, but it’s important to make sure you’re looking at the bigger picture with your finances.

SoFi Relay lets you keep track of your spending, create budgets, and set goals for what matters — like buying your next house. Get started today.

Ready to get set to buy your next house? SoFi’s Relay can help.

Photo credit: iStock/AlexSecret


SoFi’s Relay tool offers users the ability to connect both in-house accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score provided to you is a Vantage Score® based on TransUnion™ (the “Processing Agent”) data.
*Terms and conditions apply. This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the Rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed into SoFi accounts such as cash in SoFi Checking and Savings or loan balances, Stock Bits, fractional shares and cryptocurrency subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.
Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s
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Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. A hard credit pull, which may impact your credit score, is required if you apply for a SoFi product after being pre-qualified.
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What Credit Score is Needed to Rent an Apartment in 2021?

What Credit Score Is Needed to Rent an Apartment in 2022?

While there’s no universally required credit score needed to rent an apartment, having a solid credit score can certainly help your chances of a landlord handing you a set of keys. In general, a landlord will look for a credit score that is at least “good,” which is generally in the range of 570-739. However, that can vary by landlord or property manager, as well as the location in which you’re renting.

Read on to learn more about how your credit score can affect renting an apartment — and how you can approach renting if you have a lower credit score.

What Credit Score Do I Need to Rent an Apartment?

Truth is, the answer to what credit score you need to rent an apartment is a bit squishy. In general, you’ll have a better chance of approval if your credit score is at least deemed “good.”

What’s considered good? Credit scores are generally classified as follows per FICO® (keep in mind that different scoring models may vary):

•  Exceptional: 800-850

•  Very good: 740-799

•  Good: 570-739

•  Fair: 580-669

•  Very poor: 300-579

There also are variables that can affect whether your credit score qualifies you to rent an apartment. For example, if you live in a city where there is huge demand for apartments, landlords may give preference to those with higher credit scores.

Can You Get an Apartment if One Person Has Bad Credit?

If one person has bad credit, know that it will likely make it tougher for you to get an apartment. Landlords have a lot of leeway and can follow criteria of their choosing.

Still, it’s not impossible even if it is trickier. One smart strategy in this situation is to put the lease in the name of the person whose credit and income is best. You could also offer to show your income or provide a reference.

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What Landlords Look at on Your Credit Report

When your landlord reads your credit report, they will be looking for clues about your financial health and habits.

Of much importance is your debt-to-income ratio. In a nutshell, this is the amount of your monthly pre-tax income that gets spent on debt payments. It’s certainly not news to you that filing for bankruptcy can have a negative impact on one’s credit. A landlord also may be spooked if you have hefty credit card balances.

Your credit history disclosed on your credit report also may include your rental history as some landlords and rental property managers share your business to the credit bureaus. This can be plus if you’ve been doing the right thing; if not, this can work against you.

Too many hard inquiries also can raise red flags for a landlord. This is because frequently applying for different types of credit could suggest financial instability, which increases risk in the eyes of lenders — as well as landlords.

How to Rent an Apartment with a Lower Credit Score

Just because your credit score isn’t stellar doesn’t mean you’re resigned to sleeping on a friend’s couch or living with your parents. There are ways to rent an apartment even with a lower credit score.

Pay a Higher Security Deposit

One way to show that your credit history is just history is by offering to make a higher security deposit. Say you are required to pay first and last month’s rent upfront. To sweeten the deal, maybe you tack on a couple additional months of rent.

If you want to instill confidence in your potential new landlord, this might do it. Just make sure you actually have the room in your budget to offer up the cash.

Get a Co-Signer

While getting a co-signer may put a damper on feeling like you’re finally a grownup, it may be worth sucking it up and getting a creditworthy parent or other trusted individual to co-sign for your apartment. This can give your landlord peace of mind if someone is willing to pay the rent on your behalf if you’re unable to.

Just keep in mind that your co-signer will be on the hook if you drop the ball and that co-signers generally must meet even steeper credit score and income requirements.

Play Up Your Income

Maybe your credit score is nothing to brag about, but you’ve worked hard and now have your finances in order, with solid savings and a good income. If you could show that you earn three or four times your rent on a monthly basis, that might divert attention from your lousy credit score. Additionally, if you have a solid stash in your savings account, that can also give your landlord assurance that you have the funds to cover your monthly rent.

Consider Getting a Roommate

Adding a roommate to your lease or rental agreement can increase your creditworthiness and your qualifying income. This is especially the case if you can find a roommate with good credit — and get your landlord to pull their credit first.

Benefits of Good Credit When Renting an Apartment

A landlord needs more than their gut instinct to help them determine who to rent to, which is why a credit score carries a lot of weight when it comes to getting your rental application approved. A good or — better still — an excellent score can give landlords the confidence to consider you for the apartment, especially if all other signals they get when checking on your background indicate they should give you the greenlight.

Having a solid credit score can help you to snag the apartment you want, and avoid the hassles associated with trying to secure an apartment when your credit isn’t as great, such as getting a roommate or a co-signer. Especially if you live in a city with a competitive rental market, a good credit score can be a serious edge.

How to Monitor and Keep Track of Credit Scores

Ideally, you want to check your credit and get a copy of your credit report before you start apartment hunting. It’s important to know where you stand and, if there are any errors, you want to fix them right away.

Until April 20, 2022, you can get free weekly credit reports from the three national credit reporting agencies, Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. To get your free reports, simply go to AnnualCreditReport.com .

While your credit report provides information on your various credit accounts and their balances and your payment history, it does not include your credit score. You can check your credit score by looking at a loan or credit card statement or through an online credit score checker. You can also buy a score directly through credit reporting companies. Even if you might have checked your credit score not that long ago, don’t skip doing so again — your credit score updates every 30 to 45 days.

If your score is low, consider taking steps to improve it before jumping into your apartment search. Actions like paying down credit card balances and making sure you don’t have any more late or missed payments for a stretch can show progress.

What’s Expected in 2022?

According to an outlook on the U.S. rental market published by the property management platform ManageCasa, demand for rentals will grow in the coming year. In fact, ManageCasa writes that the “rise in rents for the rest of 2021 and 2022 might be surprising to some.”

The report indicates that the U.S. rental property market is currently experiencing severe shortages, heightened demand and high property prices, while those looking to rent are competing with a wealthier pool of renters. This is driving up prices.

Further compounding the situation is the fact that housing prices are so inflated that the percentage of people who can afford a home has already dropped off and likely will continue to do so, according to Forbes’ predictions . This could lead to a rental market that is even more competitive, which may not bode well for those with less than stellar credit.

The Takeaway

You’ll want to shoot for having a good credit score — generally in the range of 570-739 — to get an apartment. While you may be able to still get an apartment if you don’t have solid credit, it will make it more challenging with the competition you’re likely to face.

If you have the luxury of time, do what’s necessary to improve your score so that when you begin your search you’ll be an ideal candidate. An online credit monitoring tool like SoFi Relay can make it easier.

Stay on top of your credit score and easily see what impacts it.

Photo credit: iStock/MixMedia


Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. A hard credit pull, which may impact your credit score, is required if you apply for a SoFi product after being pre-qualified.
Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s
website
.

SoFi’s Relay tool offers users the ability to connect both in-house accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score provided to you is a Vantage Score® based on TransUnion™ (the “Processing Agent”) data.
*Terms and conditions apply. This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the Rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed into SoFi accounts such as cash in SoFi Checking and Savings or loan balances, Stock Bits, fractional shares and cryptocurrency subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.
External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands or products mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.
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What Credit Score Do You Need to Buy a Car in 2021?

What Credit Score Do You Need to Buy a Car in 2022?

Because a credit score is an important indicator for determining a consumer’s creditworthiness when buying a car, those with excellent credit histories tend to have an easier time borrowing money on favorable terms compared to those with lower credit scores. However, industry data shows that high-risk borrowers remain viable candidates for auto loans. In other words, there is no universally defined credit score needed to buy a car.

Read on to learn how your credit score can affect buying a car, plus some tips for purchasing a car with a lower credit score.

What FICO® Score Do Car Dealers Use?

There are a few different scoring models that car dealers may use for determining a customer’s credit score. They may use the FICO Auto Score 10 , an industry-specific model featuring a score range from 250 to 900. The auto industry also may use VantageScore 3.0 or the newer VantageScore 4.0 model, which has a score range from 300 to 850.

No matter which scoring model is used, a bad credit score falls on the lower end of the range and a good credit score sits on the higher end of the range.

What Is the Minimum Credit Score To Buy A Car?

There may not necessarily be a minimum credit score required to buy a car. Consumers with deep subprime credit scores from 300 to 500 have obtained financing for new and used vehicles in the second quarter of 2021, according to the credit bureau Experian’s State of the Automotive Finance Market report for that period. Although the percentage of borrowers in this category is very low, this indicates that even those with the lowest credit scores still may have access to auto financing.

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Track your credit score for free. Sign up and get 1,000 SoFi Reward points.*


Average APR by Credit Score Ranges

Consumers from all credit score categories have obtained auto loans in 2021, but car buyers with excellent credit histories tended to secure the lowest annual percentage rate (APR) financing, according to Experian’s Q2 report. When assessing what is a good credit score to buy a car, Experian’s data confirms that consumers in the super prime and prime categories obtain the lowest interest rates on average for financing.

Quarterly financing data on new vehicle purchases in the second quarter of 2021 shows the following average APRs by credit score ranges:

•  Deep subprime (300-500): 14.59%

•  Subprime (501-600): 11.03%

•  Near prime (601-660): 6.61%

•  Prime (661-780): 3.48%

•  Super prime (781-850): 2.34%

How to Buy a Car With a Lower Credit Score

Obtaining a loan to purchase a new or used vehicle when you don’t have great credit can be cumbersome, but it’s not impossible. Here are some ways a consumer with poor credit may be able to obtain auto financing:

Make a Large Down Payment

Offering a large down payment on a vehicle purchase may allow car buyers to obtain more reasonable rates and better terms for financing, resulting in more affordable monthly loan payments. By putting more money down at the time of purchase, lenders also may view the loan as less risky, thus increasing your odds of approval.

Get Cosigner Assistance

Buying a car with the assistance of a cosigner is another way to potentially bolster your chance of securing favorable financing. A cosigner agrees to share the responsibility of repaying the loan, effectively promising the lender that if you don’t make the payments they will. If the cosigner is creditworthy, it puts the buyer in a much better position to obtain financing than going it solo.

Consider a Less Expensive Car

Especially if you are buying a car with bad credit, it is important to know how much you can realistically afford to spend — and then stick to that budget, even if the dealer tries to upsell you. Additionally, finding a less costly car will reduce the amount you need to borrow, and it may be easier to get approved for a smaller loan amount than a larger one.

Benefits of Good Credit When Buying a Car

The benefit of a good credit score when buying a vehicle is that you may secure lower interest rates compared to consumers with poor credit. Unless a consumer buys a vehicle outright with cash or receives 0% APR financing, the consumer will eventually face monthly principal and interest payments until they’ve paid off the loan balance in full. Auto financing terms may vary in length, with some maturing at 60 months, 72 months or 84 months.

Car loans with a high APR may cause consumers to pay a long-term premium above and beyond the actual sales price of the vehicle.

How to Monitor and Keep Track of Credit Scores

There are a number of ways you can check your credit score, including through your credit company or another financial institution where you have an account, as well as through a credit service or credit scoring website. Contrary to what you may expect, your credit report does not include your credit score, though it does provide valuable information about your credit history and debts, which is why it can still be helpful to read over your credit report before making a major purchase like a car.

Credit scores can fluctuate over time depending upon financial circumstances, and credit score updates occur at least every 45 days. That’s why it’s important to take a look at where your score stands right before you begin the process of car shopping.

Also keep in mind that it’s common for credit inquiries to occur when you’re shopping around to see what auto loan terms you qualify for. While soft inquiries don’t affect your credit score, hard inquiries, such as those that happen when you’re comparing rates for an auto loan, can ding your score. However, most major credit scores will count multiple car loan inquiries made within a certain period of time — typically 14 days — as one inquiry.

What’s Expected in 2022?

Based on the trends outlined in Experian’s Q2 report for 2021, prime borrowers with good credit in 2022 may continue shifting away from used vehicles in favor of new vehicles. Experian’s research also shows that subprime financing remains at near-record lows, with just a fraction of car loans in 2021 going to consumers in the deep subprime risk category. These trends could continue into 2022.

The Takeaway

While it is possible to buy a vehicle with bad credit in 2022, consumers in the subprime or deep subprime risk categories may want to explore ways of improving their credit scores to help secure financing with more favorable terms. As far as what credit score you need to buy a car, any score is potentially sufficient for obtaining financing.

If you want to check your credit or work to improve your score before buying a car, SoFi Relay is a user-friendly app that allows you to easily monitor and keep track of your credit score.

Stay on top of your credit score with weekly updates.

Photo credit: iStock/tolgart


Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. A hard credit pull, which may impact your credit score, is required if you apply for a SoFi product after being pre-qualified.
Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s
website
.

SoFi’s Relay tool offers users the ability to connect both in-house accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score provided to you is a Vantage Score® based on TransUnion™ (the “Processing Agent”) data.
*Terms and conditions apply. This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the Rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed into SoFi accounts such as cash in SoFi Checking and Savings or loan balances, Stock Bits, fractional shares and cryptocurrency subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.
External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
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8 Reasons Why Good Credit Is So Important

8 Reasons Why Good Credit Is So Important

Credit matters when looking to buy a house, car or any other pricey asset. Unless a consumer is flush with cash, the path to home and vehicle ownership may go through a mortgage or a loan. Good credit can provide you with terms and privileges not available to a person with poor credit, including lower interest rates and increased borrowing capacity.

We delve into what constitutes a good credit score and the reasons why it is important to have a good credit score.

What’s Considered Good Credit?

Consumers with standard credit scores of 661 or greater are considered to have good credit, because they rank as prime or super prime in terms of their risk assessment. A bad credit score falls on the lower end of the range and a good credit score falls on the higher end of the range.

Many credit scoring models, including the standard FICO® Scores and VantageScore 4.0, measure an individual’s credit risk on a three-digit scale ranging from 300 to 850. The highest risk group are consumers with deep subprime credit scores from 300 to 500, and the lowest risk group are consumers with super prime credit scores from 781 to 850, according to Experian’s State of the Automotive Finance Market report for the second quarter of 2021.

Consumers may build and attain good credit by paying their bills on time, maintaining a mix of accounts and keeping their revolving balances under 30% of credit limits.

Check your score with SoFi Relay

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8 Benefits of Good Credit

Here are the eight core benefits of good credit, which highlight why it is important to have a good credit score:

Benefit #1: Easier Access to Credit

Good credit may provide you with easier access to additional credit. When a consumer applies for a credit card or personal loan, lenders may analyze the consumer’s credit report and credit score to make an informed decision on whether to approve or deny the application. A person with good credit is considered low-risk and therefore has an easier time getting approved for a personal loan compared to high-risk borrowers.

Benefit #2: Lower Interest Rates

Consumers with good credit may qualify for lower interest rates when borrowing money. For example, available financing data for new vehicle purchases in the second quarter of 2021 show consumers in the deep subprime category of bad credit have obtained auto loans with 14.59% interest on average. Meanwhile, consumers in the super prime category of excellent credit secured 2.34% interest rates on average, according to Experian’s quarterly report. That amounts to an over 12 percentage point difference in interest rates.

Benefit #3: Lower Car Insurance Premiums

Many auto insurance companies use credit-based insurance scores to help categorize consumers by risk and determine what premiums they may pay. Under this practice, higher-risk consumers may pay higher auto insurance premiums than lower-risk consumers. In some states, having good credit or improving your credit score may lead to lower auto insurance premiums over time.

Benefit #4: Increased Borrowing Capacity

Consumers with good credit may obtain larger credit limits than those with poor credit. This could translate to greater spending power on a credit card and the ability to make larger purchases on credit. Having good credit also puts you in a better position to apply for and obtain new credit.

A bolstered borrowing capacity is not limited to credit cards either — credit unions and banks may offer personal loans to consumers with good credit. Such loans can help you consolidate debt, finance large purchases or obtain fast cash to weather an unforeseen emergency. Personal loans also may command lower interest rates than credit cards.

Benefit #5: Easier to Buy a Home or Car

Good credit can help you buy a house with a good mortgage rate or a car with low financing. Borrowing money to own a home or vehicle may come at a price that includes principal and interest. Consumers with good credit may qualify for 0% annual percentage rate loans for a car, where no APR means no interest or finance charges. Establishing good credit may also improve your likelihood of obtaining a low-APR mortgage, which translates to lower debt repayment obligations.

Automotive consumers had an average credit score of 732 for new vehicle purchases and 665 for used vehicle purchases in the second quarter of 2021, according to Experian’s quarterly report for that period of April through June. This shows the average automotive consumer boasted good credit within the prime category of low risk.

Benefit #6: More Apartment Lease Options

Signing a lease to an apartment may require good credit. Landlords who conduct credit checks might deny lease applications if a prospective tenant has bad credit. Or, those with poor credit may have to provide a higher security deposit for rental housing compared with a prospective tenant who boasts good credit. Tenants with good credit also may have more leverage to negotiate for lower rent.

Benefit #7: Helps Satisfy Employment Background Checks

Jobseekers can benefit from good credit, as some employers may consider a person’s credit score when making hiring decisions. A U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development report released in October 2019 says that a low credit score or credit invisibility is a burden that “can thusly limit housing choice and employment opportunity,” whereas “a good credit score is part of the pathway to self-sufficiency and economic opportunity.” The term “credit invisible” refers to consumers who lack a credit score or credit history.

Benefit #8: Ability to Obtain Security Clearances

Law enforcement officers with good credit could gain privileged access to classified national security information and FBI facilities. Any state or local law enforcement officer seeking a security clearance has to first satisfy a comprehensive background check that includes a review of credit history. The FBI shares secret or top secret information with local law enforcement officers who have obtained security clearances.

Poor credit history would not necessarily disqualify an officer from obtaining a security clearance, but significant credit history issues “may prevent a clearance from being approved,” according to information posted on the FBI’s website .

The Takeaway

Good credit is important for anyone who wishes to borrow money to help finance key purchases. Many consumers rely upon mortgages and loans to buy houses and cars, while many cash-strapped individuals turn to credit cards to buy essential goods and services ranging from food and electricity to water and rent for housing.

The eight benefits of good credit highlighted above showcase why it is critical to pay your bills on time and practice good budgeting. SoFi Relay is a user-friendly app that allows you to monitor and keep track of your credit score, among other perks that could assist with financial planning and managing your net worth.

Check out the features SoFi Relay offers to help bolster your financial success.

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SoFi’s Relay tool offers users the ability to connect both in-house accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score provided to you is a Vantage Score® based on TransUnion™ (the “Processing Agent”) data.
*Terms and conditions apply. This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the Rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed into SoFi accounts such as cash in SoFi Checking and Savings or loan balances, Stock Bits, fractional shares and cryptocurrency subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.
Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. A hard credit pull, which may impact your credit score, is required if you apply for a SoFi product after being pre-qualified.
Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s
website
.

External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.
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Important Factors That Affect Property Value

7 Important Factors That Affect Property Value

There are a number of factors that affect house prices, from the age, condition, location and size of your home, to broader factors like the economy and current interest rates. If you’re thinking about putting your house on the market, it’s important to know what determines property value so you can ensure you get the most out of what’s likely your largest asset.

Read on to learn more about the main factors that make property value increase and how you can figure out how much your home is worth.

Factors that Affect Home and Real Estate Value

Factor #1: Location

There’s a reason everyone will tell you that real estate is about location, location, location — it’s true. When it comes to factors that affect property value, location is one of the biggest determinants.

Keep in mind that while your home’s location works for you, others will have their own criteria. For example, how good are the schools in the area? Is shopping and entertainment accessible? What are property taxes like in the neighborhood? Is it a long commute to downtown or wherever many jobs may be?

Factor #2: Size

Size often isn’t the be-all-and-end-all, but it’s nearly so when it comes to what determines property value. Square footage plays a big role when it comes to house prices. For example, if the median price per square foot in the U.S. is $123, you’ll be getting more for a house that’s 4,000 square feet than one that’s 2,000 square feet.

It also matters how much of the space in your house is actually usable. Spaces like unfinished garages and basements as well as attics typically won’t boost your home’s value even if they do tack a lot onto the total square footage. What will matter in terms of square footage are areas like bedrooms and bathrooms.

Factor #3: Real Estate Comparables

You’re supposed to love thy neighbor, but you might give them the side-eye if their home is not well-maintained and becomes a drag on the desirability of your street as well as on home prices. When it comes to home values, your neighbors are critical. If their homes are being highly sought by buyers, you’ll likely benefit from the popularity of the area.

The word to know here is comps, or comparable homes in your area that have sold in the last 12 months. These are part of what realtors and home appraisers rely on when estimating how much your home is worth.

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Factor #4: Age

While it may be frowned upon to ask someone their age, it’s an essential detail when it comes to home buying. If you’re dealing with a home that has a few decades in the rear-view mirror, you’ll have to do some math. How soon might the roof and other major systems need to be replaced or upgraded? That can affect the price someone is willing to pay, as they might want to pay less if they’re anticipating needing to shell out money for those repairs.

A house that is less than 10 years old — and even better if it’s less than five — can command more money because the buyer has a certain amount of confidence that repair bills shouldn’t be on the immediate horizon. They expect they’ll have time to sock away cash for when that day eventually arrives.

Factor #5: Condition

If your home isn’t in tiptop shape, don’t expect to bring in the big bucks. In fact, if you have the luxury of time, it might behoove you to make any necessary repairs and do any upgrades and updates before you put your house on the market so you can maximize the chances it will get set at a higher price. Consider the cost of home improvements an investment.

At the same time, you don’t want to get too carried away here, as it is possible that you won’t be able to recoup all that you spent. Do just enough so that you might be able to squeak out some profit when you sell. While it varies by region of the country and other factors, a 2021 survey by Remodeling Magazine found that projects that can pay off include a garage door replacement, manufactured stone veneer and a minor kitchen remodel. Some of the less profitable projects included an upscale bathroom addition and an upscale master suite addition.

Factor #6: The Economy

You could have crossed all your t’s and dotted all your i’s — your home is attractive inside and out and you’re in a great location. Trouble is, if the economy is less than stellar, you could be stuck until it swings back into positive territory. If people are uncertain and feeling insecure due to the economy, they may decide to delay major life changes, such as buying a home. Or, if they do move forward, they may be looking for bargains, which is a downer for you.

Your local economy and market figure also into the equation. It’s about supply and demand. If there is a shortage of available housing in your area and tons of potential buyers on the hunt, you could capitalize big time on a hot market — think bidding wars and selling your home faster than you could have imagined.

Factor #7: Interest Rates

When interest rates are at the historic lows, as they have been in recent times, it’s an incentive to buy. This is because doing so can be dramatically less expensive. On the flipside, when interest rates tick upward, fewer people may be able to home shop because it’s more costly. If demand slows, the price you can command may dip as well.

How to Check What Your Home Is Worth

Get an appraiser: One way to check how much your home is worth is to get an appraiser, someone who is licensed or certified by the state, to conduct a home appraisal. The appraiser will review your home from top to bottom and compare it to other homes in the area and beyond to determine its fair market value.

Make a list of comparables: You could also go dig up property comparables on your own. For example, you can call real estate agents with homes in escrow to learn the sales prices. There are also several websites that could give you valuable insight on your home’s value, including Zillow, Trulia, Redfin, Realtor.com and Eppraisal, among others.

Use an HPI calculator: Another option is to use a house price index (HPI) calculator , which uses data from mortgage transactions over time to estimate a home’s value. The calculator makes projections based on the purchase price of the home and the changing value of other homes nearby. This tool is ideal for seeing how much a house has appreciated over time and any estimated future changes in mortgage rates.

The Takeaway

Knowing what factors impact your home’s value is like knowing how much money you have in the bank. Determine where you may have weaknesses so you can make the necessary adjustments to get the maximum value for your home when you go to sell.

If you need to save up to make some necessary repairs and upgrades before you put your home on the market, a tool like SoFi Relay can help you finesse your budget accordingly.

See how SoFi Relay can help you get the most out of your finances.

Photo credit: iStock/terng99


External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.
Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands or products mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
SoFi’s Relay tool offers users the ability to connect both in-house accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score provided to you is a Vantage Score® based on TransUnion™ (the “Processing Agent”) data.
*Terms and conditions apply. This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the Rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed into SoFi accounts such as cash in SoFi Checking and Savings or loan balances, Stock Bits, fractional shares and cryptocurrency subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.
Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s
website
.

Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. A hard credit pull, which may impact your credit score, is required if you apply for a SoFi product after being pre-qualified.
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