FEATURED BLOG POST

Millennials Are Seeking Prenups—and It Might Just Be Worth Considering

Read More

millennials marrying and signing prenups

Millennials Are Seeking Prenups—and It Might Just Be Worth Considering

It’s not exactly news that millennials are marrying later than the generations before them. But to give you a sense of just how differently they approach the tradition from their parents, in 1962, nearly 60% of 18- to 30-year-olds were married. Today, just 20% of people in that same age range have tied the knot. As such, they’re older than their predecessors were, too—whereas the average woman in the ’70s was barely 20 when she walked up the aisle, today she’s over 27.

Waiting to be more mature and financially stable before marrying is not a bad thing, and could help to explain another trend on the rise among this age group. Before saying, “I do,” millennials are asking for prenups, in larger numbers than before. In fact, just over 50% of matrimonial lawyers attest that the number of millennials requesting prenuptial agreements is on the rise.

Read more
Facing a post-MBA career crossroads

Facing a Post-MBA Career Crossroads: How To Pull a Successful Career Pivot

You worked hard to earn your MBA and land a prestigious job upon graduation. But after a couple of years in, you might be thinking, Is this all there is? If you’re unfulfilled because you’re not passionate about the day-to-day reality of your job—don’t worry, you’re not alone. Not by a long shot.

I’ve worked with many MBA alumni who faced this challenge. While going with the highest salary offer to relieve some of the financial pressures of their student loan debt made practical sense at first, a taste of financial freedom allows them explore positions better aligned with purpose and interests. Simply put, they focus less about the ROI of their MBAs, and more on finding engaging, yet still lucrative, work. Others focus on getting married and starting families; as their priorities changed, career tracks offering flexibility and work-life balance became more desirable.

If you’re a couple of years removed from business school and now at a career crossroads, here’s how to develop expert career management skills that will help you find a great next step.

Read more

How Student Loans Could Impact Your Taxes

With Tax Day (April 18th this year) just around the corner, it’s time to get serious about your taxes. If you paid tuition or student loan interest in the previous tax year, you may qualify for a student loan interest deduction or education tax credit—which could mean a lower tax bill or a higher tax refund. Here’s a simple breakdown of the tax credits and deductions you might be eligible for.

Read more
7 Mistakes to Avoid When Choosing a Student Loan Cosigner

7 Easily Avoidable Mistakes When Choosing (or Removing) a Student Loan Cosigner

A good education will help you achieve your career goals, but your degree comes with a staggering price tag—one that’ll definitely hit you with sticker shock. Consider this: In 2015, the average college debt at graduation ranged from $3,000 to $53,000.

While there are plenty of scholarship, grant, loan, and refinancing options available to college students, they’re not all easy to get. In some cases, you’ll simply be able to sign on the dotted line once your applications are approved. But in other cases, such as with private student loans, you might need a co-signer—a creditworthy individual who will be legally responsible for repayment should you default, become disabled, or die.

If you’re just starting school and lack the steady income and solid credit history required for approval, a co-signer will help you clear the approval hurdle. And if you already have a student loan and that debt (and the interest that comes with it) is weighing you down, a co-signer can be your refinancing angel. In either situation, you’ll be in good company: In 2015-2016, about 94% of undergraduate private student loans included a co-signer, as did 61% of graduate private student loans.

Before you jump in, though, make sure you understand the dos and don’ts of choosing—and removing—a student loan co-signer.

(And while you’re at it, check out SoFi’s new Student Loan Debt Navigator tool to asses your student loan repayment options.)

Read more
How the World's Top Five Nations Handle Student Loan Debt

How The World’s Top 5 Nations in Education Handle Student Loan Debt

Concerns about the rising cost of college in the United States—and the $1.4 trillion in student loan debt nationwide—are alive and well. And they’ve prompted a lot of discussion about the different ways our educational peers nearby, across the pond, and beyond handle student loan repayment programs. When it comes to tuition costs and paying off student loans, the American system is unique—and not for all the reasons you might think.

It turns out that cheap or even free tuition doesn’t mean the end of student loans. Student loans are common even in countries with free tuition, because no matter where you go to college, you have to live somewhere and, of course, eat. Sweden gets a lot of attention because tuition there is free. Still, Swedish students borrow money for college just as frequently as Americans do—and about 70% of students in both countries have student loans. But Swedish students graduate with about $20,000 in debt, compared to about $30,000 for American graduates.

To explore how the rest of the world pays for learning, we looked at the most recent QS World University Rankings. Thirty-two of the top 100 schools are in the U.S. Another 32 are found in just four countries: the United Kingdom, Germany, Australia, and Canada. Below, we compare the way higher education is financed in all five nations, in descending rank order.

Read more
Page 29 of 95« First...1020...2728293031...405060...Last »
SSL Encrypted
Equal Housing Lender