FEATURED BLOG POST

Millennials Are Seeking Prenups—and It Might Just Be Worth Considering

Read More

7 Mistakes to Avoid When Choosing a Student Loan Cosigner

7 Easily Avoidable Mistakes When Choosing (or Removing) a Student Loan Cosigner

A good education will help you achieve your career goals, but your degree comes with a staggering price tag—one that’ll definitely hit you with sticker shock. Consider this: In 2015, the average college debt at graduation ranged from $3,000 to $53,000.

While there are plenty of scholarship, grant, loan, and refinancing options available to college students, they’re not all easy to get. In some cases, you’ll simply be able to sign on the dotted line once your applications are approved. But in other cases, such as with private student loans, you might need a co-signer—a creditworthy individual who will be legally responsible for repayment should you default, become disabled, or die.

If you’re just starting school and lack the steady income and solid credit history required for approval, a co-signer will help you clear the approval hurdle. And if you already have a student loan and that debt (and the interest that comes with it) is weighing you down, a co-signer can be your refinancing angel. In either situation, you’ll be in good company: In 2015-2016, about 94% of undergraduate private student loans included a co-signer, as did 61% of graduate private student loans.

Before you jump in, though, make sure you understand the dos and don’ts of choosing—and removing—a student loan co-signer.

(And while you’re at it, check out SoFi’s new Student Loan Debt Navigator tool to asses your student loan repayment options.)

Read more
How the World's Top Five Nations Handle Student Loan Debt

How The World’s Top 5 Nations in Education Handle Student Loan Debt

Concerns about the rising cost of college in the United States—and the $1.4 trillion in student loan debt nationwide—are alive and well. And they’ve prompted a lot of discussion about the different ways our educational peers nearby, across the pond, and beyond handle student loan repayment programs. When it comes to tuition costs and paying off student loans, the American system is unique—and not for all the reasons you might think.

It turns out that cheap or even free tuition doesn’t mean the end of student loans. Student loans are common even in countries with free tuition, because no matter where you go to college, you have to live somewhere and, of course, eat. Sweden gets a lot of attention because tuition there is free. Still, Swedish students borrow money for college just as frequently as Americans do—and about 70% of students in both countries have student loans. But Swedish students graduate with about $20,000 in debt, compared to about $30,000 for American graduates.

To explore how the rest of the world pays for learning, we looked at the most recent QS World University Rankings. Thirty-two of the top 100 schools are in the U.S. Another 32 are found in just four countries: the United Kingdom, Germany, Australia, and Canada. Below, we compare the way higher education is financed in all five nations, in descending rank order.

Read more
How couples manage their money together

Two Couples Open Up On How They Manage Money, Together

Far and away, money issues are the leading cause of stress in relationships. It makes sense when you consider that nearly 13 million Americans withhold financial information—including bank accounts and credit cards—from the people they love.

Obviously, that’s not exactly a healthy way to engage in a relationship. That’s why, instead of allowing money issues to balloon into financial infidelity, or to become even a minor source of tension between you and your partner, it’s important to talk about how the two of you plan to manage your money as a couple.

SoFi members Jennifer Nichols and Anthony Latta learned over time what it takes to successfully combine their individual financial lives with that of their partner’s through trial-and-error in their own relationships. Here’s their advice for merging money in a relationship, from what works well to what definitely doesn’t.

Read more
sofi wealth, market commentary

Jobs Grow Faster Than Wages – Week of Feb. 15, 2017

A preponderance of solid economic data has sent equity markets higher as they brush aside the political risk stemming from a chaotic new administration. Focus has shifted back towards the Federal Reserve and the outlook for monetary policy after several weeks in which expectations of tax cuts and infrastructure spending captivated markets. We continue to like a globally diversified equity portfolio and short duration fixed income.

Read more
Paying for fertility treatment using a personal loan

Paying for Fertility Treatments: How One Couple Financed their Path to Parenthood

The plan, Jonathan recalls, was straightforward: Marry his fiancée, get away for a honeymoon, and get down to the business of starting a family.

“My wife was 39 and I’d just turned 40,” he says. “We wanted to have kids, and we also knew time wasn’t necessarily on our side.”

The wedding and honeymoon were beautiful. But soon after their return—and after several months of trying to conceive without success—they started to worry, and decided to see a doctor. “We figured she would tell us everything was fine, but then she ordered tests.”

The news wasn’t good: He and his wife were infertile. They might still have children, their doctor told them, but not without medical assistance. “Becoming parents would require a special procedure,” Jonathan says. “And it was going to cost us a lot of money.”

Read more
Page 20 of 86« First...10...1819202122...304050...Last »
SSL Encrypted
Equal Housing Lender