What Are The Tax Benefits of an Limited Liability Company (LLC)?

What Are the Tax Benefits of a Limited Liability Company (LLC)?

When people are starting a business, it’s likely that they’ll consider the tax benefits of different company structures. In some cases, founders may create a limited liability company (LLC) specifically for its tax benefits.

Here, we’ll delve into the tax benefits of LLCs for business owners, as well as other pros and cons.

What Is an LLC?

An LLC is a type of business structure available in the United States. A kind of hybrid, it combines some characteristics of corporations with others from a partnership or sole proprietorship.

According to the IRS, LLC owners are called “members.” Depending on the state in which you set up the LLC, members may be individual people, other LLCs, or corporations. There is no maximum number of members that a company can have, and most states allow LLCs with just one member. Check your state for specifics.

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Tax Benefits of Forming an LLC

As mentioned above, company founders may choose an LLC structure especially for its tax benefits. Here, we go into detail about what those benefits are.

Limited Liability

An LLC, as its full name implies, provides limited liability to its members. This means that, if the company fails, the owners’ and investors’ private assets are not at risk and can’t be seized to repay company debts.

Flexible Membership

As noted previously, an LLC can have one member or many, and those members can be individuals or companies. This business structure gives owners significant freedom when starting their company.

Management Structure Options

LLCs can be managed by a member (owner) or by a hired manager. A member-managed LLC may be chosen if the company has limited resources or few members. An owner may select a member with management experience to oversee the business, or they may want all members to actively participate in the company’s operations.

A hired manager is someone who is not a member but has the appropriate experience and skill sets to run the LLC. An accountant or financial advisor can go into detail about the tax benefits of member-manager vs. hired manager approaches. (Here’s what to know if you’re filing taxes for the first time.)

Pass-Through Taxation

LLC member-owners have some control over how their business will be taxed. If there is only one member, it will automatically be treated like a sole proprietorship, and if there is more than one, like a partnership. In those cases, business income will pass through the business to the member-owners, and they’ll only get taxed once. Members will report income and losses on their personal tax returns, while the LLC itself is not taxed. (Learn how business income differs from other types of income.)

Because income and losses are reported as part of members’ personal financial pictures at tax time, taxes will be owed at each member’s personal tax rate.

Alternatively, the LLC owners may decide to be taxed as a corporation. If they choose an S-Corp structure, pass-through taxation still applies.

Recommended: How Long Does It Take Taxes to Come Back?

Heightened Credibility

When someone opens an LLC, it shows that they’ve gone beyond just hanging a shingle. Instead, they went through the decision making and paper filing processes involved in setting up the LLC.

Limited Compliance Requirements

According to the U.S. Small Business Association (SBA), another form of business structure — the corporation — has the strictest requirements. In contrast, LLCs have some but fewer.

In general, an LLC should maintain a current operating agreement, hold annual meetings, ensure that they have appropriate shares recorded for each member, and keep records if membership interests transfer. (Find out if you can use a personal checking account for your business.)

Disadvantages of Creating an LLC

So far, the LLC sounds like the ideal low-maintenance company structure. However, there are several caveats to be aware of.

Cost

Forming an LLC can cost a few hundred dollars, which may be more than what a small business wants to spend. The company will also need to file annual reports along with annual fees and taxes. These taxes and fees may cost a miniscule amount or several hundred dollars annually.

No Stock Ownership

When a corporation wants to raise funds, they sometimes issue shares of stock. An LLC cannot issue stock.

Recommended: How to Start Investing in Stocks

Transferable Ownership

Some states may require that an LLC be dissolved if there is a change in ownership. If the people starting the business expect to take in outside investors over the years, a corporation might be a better choice.

How to Form an LLC

Once you’ve decided to start an LLC, you’ll want to choose and reserve a company name that doesn’t conflict with currently existing ones. Typically, an LLC must have what’s called a registered agent: someone who will handle official documents for the company.

Then, you’ll need to document the nuts and bolts of the operating agreement that describes the structure of the company. This can include who owns what portion of the company and who gets to vote on which issues. You’ll detail how profits and losses will be addressed, how the company will be managed, when meetings will be held, and how to handle the business if a member leaves the company or dies. This document should also describe what should happen if the company goes out of business.

Recommended: 2022 IRS Tax Refund Dates

How LLCs Are Different From Other Business Entities

An LLC is formed to be a legal entity that’s separate from its owners and is responsible for its business debts. Here’s how an LLC differs from other company structures.

LLC vs Sole Proprietorship

Profits in an LLC are only taxed once because of the pass-through taxation structure. This is reported on and addressed through owners’ personal tax returns by filing a Form 1040, Schedule C, listing profits or losses. As an LLC owner, you may be taxed as a sole proprietor, a partnership, or a corporation.

A sole proprietorship is owned by one person and is the simplest structure available. A sole proprietorship also involves pass-through taxation with the business owner paying taxes on the business’s profit. There isn’t as much flexibility in filing as a sole proprietor as there is with an LLC.

LLC vs S-Corp

An LLC is a business structure. An S-corp, meanwhile, is a tax classification. Many businesses decide to have their LLC taxed as an S-corp. The nuances can be complicated, so it makes sense to consult your personal accountant or other professional before making this decision.

LLC for Rental Property

If you create an LLC to buy rental homes, you’ll have the benefits of no personal liability and pass-through taxation. There can be a flexible ownership structure, personal anonymity, and fairly simple reporting.

However, it may be harder to finance rental property as an LLC. There can also be significant fees to get the LLC up and running. LLCs for rentals can be more complex at tax time, and property transfers can also be more complicated.

Recommended: Does Net Worth Include Home Equity?

How to Choose the Right Business Type

Consider how simple or complex your proposed business will become. Do you plan to basically run the business yourself, or will it ideally turn into something bigger? What kind of legal protections will you need based on your business plans?

Entrepreneurs should also weigh the tax benefits of LLCs and sole proprietorships. The two structures, along with partnerships and S-corps, feature pass-through benefits, meaning that profits are taxed only when they’re paid to the company owner(s). A C-corp, meanwhile, is taxed as a company as well as when shareholder payouts are made.

Consult your accountant or financial advisor for specifics on your situation.

Recommended: Should I Sell My House Now or Wait?

The Takeaway

Limited liability companies (LLCs) come with plenty of advantages and a few disadvantages. As its name implies, the owners’ and investors’ private assets are not at risk if the company should struggle financially. Owners of the LLC are referred to as members. Membership may range from one individual to multiple individuals to other companies.

A major benefit is pass-through taxation, where income passes through the company to its members, who report it on their personal taxes. One disadvantage of LLCs for very small businesses is the startup cost and annual fees, which can run to several hundred dollars a year. Consult a professional to find out whether an LLC is the right fit for your business plan.

No matter what business structure you choose, it’s important to keep track of your finances. SoFi Insights, our spending app, provides you with an easy to use online budget planner so you can stay on top of your finances.

Benefit from the insights you’ve always wanted with SoFi Insights.

FAQ

What are the tax benefits of having an LLC?

With an LLC, you’ll have flexibility in deciding the structure under which your company will be taxed. There are more tax benefits of an LLC, including pass-through taxation, which means you’ll only get taxed once at your individual tax rate.

What are the benefits of a limited liability company?

They can include limited liability, meaning that owners aren’t personally responsible for company debts; flexible structures; pass-through taxation; more credibility; and fewer compliance requirements compared to a corporation.

What is the best tax option for an LLC?

Each situation is unique, so consult your accountant or financial advisor for specifics.


Photo credit: iStock/hh5800

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This article is not intended to be legal advice. Please consult an attorney for advice.
Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.
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How Much Electrician School Costs and How to Pay for It

Paying for Electrician School and How Much It Costs

Becoming an electrician can lead to a fulfilling, rewarding, and high-paying career. However, electrician school costs up to $20,000, depending on the program.

Paying tuition costs up front may not be possible. To help manage this hefty electrician trade school price tag, there are a few different program and financing options to consider.

How Much Does Electrician School Typically Cost?

A profession as an electrician is among the list of high-paying, no-degree jobs that can be a lucrative career. If you decide to enroll in electrician trade school to help you along your path to becoming an electrician, it can cost anywhere from $1,000 to $20,000 to complete the program. This might depend on the program you enroll in and the school you attend.

How Long Does Electrician School Take?

Community college electrician school programs prepare students for apprenticeship and a future career as an electrician. Typically, it takes one to two years to complete electrician trade school.

What Are Classes Like at Electrician School?

Although each program is different, generally, electrical school guides you through relevant mathematics, standardized electrical code, electrical theory, and fundamental techniques regarding wiring, safety, conduit bending, and other skills.

In addition to in-class knowledge, electrician school often includes hands-on practical application.

Can You Make Money As an Electrician While In School?

It might be challenging to secure paid electrician work, if you’re in the middle of electrician school. However, if you’ve been accepted into an electrical apprenticeship program, and are attending electrical school on the side, the apprenticeship often involves paid, hands-on learning opportunities and possibly health benefits.

Pros and Cons of Electrician School

If you’re unsure whether enrolling in electrician school is worth it, weigh the advantages and disadvantages of going this route.

Pros

Cons

Might be a fast way to get in the door toward an electrical career State might still require an apprenticeship program
Sets you apart when applying for apprenticeship Potentially high-cost and might incur student debt
Might count toward required apprenticeship hours Not an “earn as you learn” option

Financing Electrician School

Although you can choose to pay entirely out of pocket for electrician trade school costs, it’s not always feasible. Fortunately, there are a handful of ways to get your trade education financed — some of which must be repaid while others don’t need to be paid back.

Financial Aid

Future electricians attending an eligible trade school may be able to qualify for federal student aid including grants, scholarships, work-study, or federal student loans. Not all trade or vocational schools qualify for federal aid.

To find out if the program you are considering is eligible, take a look at the Federal School Code Search administered by the U.S. Department of Education. Another option is to check in with the financial aid office at the school.

To apply for federal financial aid, students will need to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®).

Grants

Federal grants, like the Pell Grant, are available to students who are pursuing a bachelor’s degree and demonstrate financial need. Pell Grants typically don’t need to be paid back, and offer awards up to $6,895 for the 2022-23 academic year.

Recommended: FAFSA vs. Pell Grants

Scholarships

Scholarships are another type of gift aid that doesn’t need to be repaid. They can be found through your state, local government, school, and nonprofit institutions. For example, the American Public Power Association offers lineworker and technical education scholarship awards of $2,000 to chosen recipients.

Employer Sponsoring

If you’re already employed, and want to enroll in an electrician school to enhance your job-related skills, ask your employer if it’s willing to sponsor your electrician school cost. Some companies offer this benefit as long as you successfully complete the program and agree to apply your training within the company for a certain number of years.

Federal Student Loans

Through the FAFSA, you can see if you’re eligible for subsidized or unsubsidized student loans. This type of aid must be paid back, plus interest at a fixed rate.

Private Student Loans

If the above financing sources aren’t an option and you need funds, private student loans may help pay for electrician trade school costs. Private student loans are offered by banks, credit unions, trade schools, and other financial institutions. Be aware that they typically don’t offer the same level of protections as federal student loans, such as extended forbearance or deferment options if you face financial hardship.

Recommended: Guide to Private Student Loans

How to Select an Electrician Training Program

Deciding how you want to pursue an electrician training program highly depends on the amount of time you’re willing to commit, and your preferred learning style. Below is an overview of the program options available.

Apprenticeship

Learning the electrical trade is commonly done through apprenticeship. This option is typically a four-year commitment with a mix of classroom and field training. This option lets you learn the hands-on skills and knowledge needed to become an electrician while earning a wage.

Certificate

Certification can take about 1 to 2 years to complete. You can enroll in an electrician certification program through a local community college or trade school. In some states, like California, an electrical certification might be required to perform work for contractors with a certain license class.

Associate Degree

An associates degree can offer more comprehensive education, though it’s not typically a requirement to be an electrician. Associate degrees might be offered through a trade school or community college, and can help boost applications for apprenticeship programs.

Bachelor’s Degree

If you’d like to pursue a bachelor’s degree as an electrician in a highly academic setting, a four-year program might make sense for you. Students typically enroll in programs, like electrical technology and learn about regulation, electrical theory, and more.

This option provides the greatest flexibility in terms of transferable courses for related industries, like electrical and/or systems engineering.

Military Training

Another way to obtain electrical school training is through the U.S. Armed Forces. By enlisting as a service member, you’ll first receive basic military training, and afterward, can receive electrical job training if you meet program requirements.

For example, the U.S. Army offers interior electrician job training for soldiers who complete 10 weeks of basic training, and seven weeks of Advanced Individual Training, and earn an ASVAB score of 93 in Electronics.

Electrician Job and Income Prospects

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job outlook for electricians from 2021-2031 is expected to grow at an average pace at 7% growth.

PayScale.com estimates that an electrician journeyman earns an average base salary of $61,886 per year, while a master electrician earns a higher salary at $73,334 per year. Salaries, however, depend on a variety of factors, such as skill certifications, years of experience, and location.

Alternatives to Becoming an Electrician

If after learning how much electrician trade school costs you feel it’s not the right profession for you, pursuing another trade or performing a hands-on field job might be of interest. Some alternative jobs include being a:

•   Construction laborer

•   Automotive service technician

•   Equipment operator

•   HVAC installer

•   Home inspector

•   Project manager

The Takeaway

Electrician school costs can range widely, from $1,000 to $20,000, depending on factors like the program, location, and more. Paying for electrician school costs can be an incredible investment for your career advancement and to enhance your technical knowledge, but it’s also a financial commitment.

If you’ve exhausted your financing options, and find that you need additional aid, a private student loan from SoFi might help (though SoFi’s student loans aren’t available for those attending trade school or community college). Undergraduate student loans may be available for those pursuing a four-year electrician degree.

Qualifying borrowers can secure competitive private student loan rates and SoFi loans have zero fees, and up to the total cost of your school’s certified cost of attendance. Plus, it only takes three minutes to check your rate online.

Cover up to 100% of school-certified costs including tuition, books, supplies, room and board, and transportation with a private student loan from SoFi.

FAQ

How long does electrician school take?

An electrician school program can take about four years to complete for an apprentice to acquire the training necessary to become a state-licensed Journeyman electrician who’s able to work unsupervised. However, this time frame varies, depending on the training path you decide to take and the licensing requirements of your state.

How much do the highest paid electricians make?

Master electricians are the highest level in the field and command an average base salary of $82,000 per year, according to PayScale data. Where you’re located and your years of experience impacts your earning potential.

What are the highest paid trade jobs in the U.S.?

A profession as an electrician makes up the top five highest-paid trade jobs in the U.S., along with licensed practical nurses, HVAC technicians, home inspectors, and plumbers.


Photo credit: iStock/Davizro

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Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
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22 High Paying Trade Vocational Jobs in 2023

22 High Paying Trade Vocational Jobs in 2023

People tend to think of vocational jobs — which require special skills and training, but not necessarily a college degree — as paying less than careers that call for higher education. But there are plenty of vocational jobs, in a wide range of fields, that can provide a competitive paycheck. And those jobs can be both personally rewarding and vital to the economy.

If you aren’t sure college is in your future — because of the cost, the time commitment, or the desire to pursue a skilled job for which you have a passion — read on to learn more about which vocational jobs are among the highest-paying.

What Is a Vocational Job?

Vocational occupations generally require using specific skills that may be learned with hands-on training and/or classroom instruction — through an apprenticeship, for example, or at a vocational school or community college.

People may assume vocational jobs are mostly manual labor (think plumbers or machine operators), but that isn’t always the case. Many vocational jobs are done in an office setting, or in a hospital, airport, or school. And increasingly these jobs can require serious technical skills. So even though a vocational job won’t require a degree, workers may have to earn certain licenses or certifications to prove their proficiency, find employment, or advance in their career.

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Reasons for Applying for a Vocational Job

If you look up the word “vocation” in the dictionary, you’ll see that it’s sometimes used to describe a strong desire or “calling” to do a certain kind of work. And for workers in many vocational careers — bakers, hair stylists, carpenters, landscapers — the work they do is truly their passion.

But there are other reasons why workers might pursue a vocational job, including:

Eagerness To Enter the Workforce

Because a vocational job doesn’t require a four-year degree, workers can get a head start on life:

•   Get into the labor force faster.

•   Start earning a competitive salary or hourly wage.

•   Begin saving and investing money.

Recommended: What Is a Good Entry Level Salary?

Avoid Heavy Student Debt

Vocational school costs less than a four-year college, which can mean spending less upfront and graduating with no loans or lower student loan payments.

Follow in Someone’s Footsteps

If the family business is HVAC repair, a bakery, or salon, it might have been a goal since childhood to lean into that legacy.

A Less Traditional Path

Some extremely successful entrepreneurs, including tech executives like Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg, built their empires without earning a college degree. A college education can be a plus, but it isn’t a must for everyone.

Job Security

There likely will always be plumbers, auto mechanics, electricians, and cooks. And those aren’t the only vocational jobs that offer stability and competitive pay. Check out the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ current list of the “Fastest Growing Occupations,” which projects job growth to 2031. You’ll see wind turbine service technicians, occupational therapy assistants, solar panel installers, and several other vocational careers.

Recommended: The Highest Paying Jobs in Every State

Pros and Cons of Pursuing a Vocational Job

Besides saving money and time on a four-year degree, there are other positives to pursuing a vocational career, including:

•   Unlike a career that requires a bachelor’s degree or higher, you probably won’t have to spend time studying material unrelated to the job you want.

•   Even while you’re in training, you’ll be making contacts that can help you in your career.

•   Many vocational jobs are stable and in high demand.

But there are some downsides, too, to training for a vocational job:

•   If your education or training is too narrow in scope, you may have to go back to school if you decide to transition to a new job.

•   Your vocational program may not qualify for some types of federal financial aid.

•   Specialized careers often require continuing education to update skills and renew certifications.

Tips for Finding Vocational Jobs

If you think a vocational job might be right for you, here are some steps to consider as you get started:

Find a Mentor

Ask someone who is doing the job you’re interested in how they got started. They may be able to steer you toward a good training program, apprenticeship, or even a job.

Use Connections Made During Training

If you attend a vocational school, you likely will have access to networking events, career fairs, and job placement assistance. (Some programs offer lifetime placement assistance to their graduates.) Apprenticeships, certification courses, and even high school vocational programs may also offer opportunities to connect with potential employers.

Consider Enrolling in Job Corps

Job Corps is a free federal program that offers education, on-the-job training, and career assistance for young adults (ages 16 to 24). Career opportunities are available in a variety of fields, including automotive repair, manufacturing, construction, hospitality, renewable resources, health care, and homeland security.

Check Employment Sites and Job Boards

Many popular job boards include listings for apprenticeships and vocational jobs, as well as information on how to begin your job search.

22 High-Paying Trade Vocational Jobs in 2023

The money you can earn in any vocational job will vary depending on several factors:

•   Education and training

•   Certifications and credentials

•   Experience

•   Job difficulty

•   How much work you’re willing to put in

With that in mind, here are some high-paying vocational jobs to consider in 2023. (Average wages and job growth outlook are from Bureau of Labor Statistics data.)

1. Air Traffic Controller

Median Annual Salary: $129,750

Job Description: Coordinate the safe movement of various aircraft as they arrive and depart the airport.

Duties May Include: Using computers, radar, and visual references to direct air and ground traffic. Monitoring weather conditions. Alerting pilots to potential emergencies.

Entry Level Education Requirements: Associate degree plus training program

Job Outlook: 1% (little or no change)

Getting Started: Air traffic controllers typically earn an associate degree from an Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI) program. Controllers also must meet several Federal Aviation Association (FAA) requirements, complete training at the FAA Academy, and obtain FAA certification.

2. Commercial Pilot

Median Annual Salary: $99,640

Job Description: Pilot a plane or other aircraft for a business, individual, or organization.

Duties May Include: Navigating and flying planes, helicopters, or other aircraft. Managing flight crew and interacting with ground crew. Assisting in maintenance and recordkeeping. Interacting with passengers.

Entry Level Education Requirements: Varies by employer

Job Outlook: 6% (average)

Getting Started
: To get a commercial pilot certificate, applicants must meet federal requirements for age and flight hours. They also must pass a physical exam, including a vision test. And they must earn the FAA-issued certificates and ratings required for their job. For more on commercial pilot requirements, see our guide to paying for flight school.

3. Nuclear Technician

Median Annual Salary: $99,340

Job Description: Assist physicists, engineers, and others doing nuclear research and nuclear energy production.

Duties May Include: Using computers and other equipment to monitor and help operate nuclear reactors.

Entry Level Education Requirements: Associate degree

Job Outlook: -17% (declining)

Getting Started: Many community colleges and technical institutes have associate degree programs in nuclear science, nuclear technology, or related fields. The amount of on-the-job training required to become a nuclear technician varies from one employer to the next and may be based on previous experience and education. Technicians often are expected to update their training throughout their career. Several certification programs are available.

4. Elevator and Escalator Mechanic

Median Annual Salary: $97,860

Job Description: Install and repair elevators, escalators, moving walkways, and related equipment.

Duties May Include: Testing, maintaining, and repairing electrical lines and control systems. Keeping inspection records.

Entry Level Education Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Job Outlook: 3% (slower than average)

Getting Started: This work, which is both technical and physical, requires participating in an apprenticeship program through a union, employer, or industry association. In many states, you must be licensed.

5. Radiation Therapist

Median Annual Salary: $82,790

Job Description: Use radiation equipment to treat cancer patients, typically in a hospital, doctor’s office, or outpatient center.

Duties May Include: Explaining treatment plans. Treating and monitoring patients. Updating records.

Entry Level Education Requirements: Associate degree

Job Outlook: 6% (average)

Getting Started: Accredited associate degree programs typically offer both classroom and hands-on training. Most states require some type of licensing or certification.

6. Dental Hygienist

Median Annual Salary: $77,810

Job Description: Provide screenings, treatment, and preventive care for oral diseases.

Duties May Include: Taking X-rays, cleaning teeth, advising patients about good oral hygiene, keeping records.

Entry Level Education Requirements: Associate degree

Job Outlook: 9% (faster than average)

Getting Started: Look for a dental hygiene degree program accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation, which should offer both classroom and clinical education. To become certified as a Licensed Dental Hygienist (LDH), you must also pass any state-required licensure exams.

7. MRI Technologist

Median Annual Salary: $77,360

Job Description: MRI technologists produce diagnostic images for patients at health-care facilities.

Duties May Include: Working with physicians and patients to get requested diagnostic images using an MRI scanner.

Entry Level Education Requirements: Associate degree

Job Outlook: 6% (about average)

Getting Started: Some states require MRI techs to complete an accredited training program before they can be licensed. Accredited MRI programs typically require applicants to have an associate degree for acceptance. If you’re heading to school with this job in mind, you may want to focus on anatomy, biology, and other health-related courses.

8. Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

Median Annual Salary: $65,550

Job Description: Mechanics and technicians work in hangars, repair stations, and at airfields, repairing and maintaining aircraft and equipment.

Duties May Include: Diagnosing problems, repairing malfunctioning systems, installing new equipment.

Entry Level Education Requirements: Varies by employer

Job Outlook: 6% (average)

Getting Started: Mechanics and technicians typically attend an FAA-approved aviation school, but some may gain their skills while in the military or on the job. You don’t have to have a degree, but you must be FAA-certified to work on aircraft.

9. Wholesale or Manufacturing Sales Representative

Median Annual Salary: $62,890

Job Description: Sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers to a variety of businesses and other organizations, including government agencies.

Duties May Include: Working with clients in person and remotely to meet sales quotas and ensure quality customer service. Many sales representatives are given a specific geographical territory to cover.

Entry Level Education Requirements: Can vary depending on what’s being sold. Some products may require more technical knowledge than others

Job Outlook: 4% (average)

Getting Started: Companies may offer a formal training program for sales employees that can include learning about all aspects of the product, from manufacturing to distribution. Certification and continuing education may be required.

10. Occupational Therapy Assistant

Median Annual Salary: $61,730

Job Description: Help patients work on skills needed for daily living and working.

Duties May Include: Working with therapists and patients to regain or improve basic life skills, such as getting up from a bed or chair, and walking. The job requires physical strength, patience, and good communication skills.

Entry Level Education Requirements: Associate degree

Job Outlook: 25% (much faster than average)

Getting Started: Occupational therapy assistants typically must obtain an associate degree from an accredited program that includes both academic study and field work. Most states require licensure.

11. Electrician

Median Annual Salary: $60,040

Job Description: Install, maintain, and repair electrical systems for businesses and homeowners.

Duties May Include: Problem-solving when electrical systems aren’t working properly, reading blueprints, laying wire, and connecting fixtures.

Entry Level Education Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Job Outlook: 7% (average)

Getting Started: This job can require both physical and technical ability. Some electricians attend a vocational program and then move on to an apprenticeship. Others may learn their skills in the military, while many go straight to a lengthy (4-5 years) apprenticeship. Most states require a license to do this type of work.

Recommended: Does Net Worth Include Home Equity?

12. Plumber

Median Annual Salary: $59,880

Job Description: Plumbers install, repair, and replace pipes and fixtures in homes and buildings.

Duties May Include: Knowing building codes and mastering everything from new builds to regular maintenance and emergency fixes.

Entry Level Education Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Job Outlook: 2% (slower than average)

Getting Started: Plumbers typically learn their trade through an apprenticeship or vocational program. Most states have licensing requirements.

Recommended: Should I Sell My House Now or Wait?

13. Civil Engineering Technologist / Technician

Median Annual Salary: $58,320

Job Description: Help plan, design, build, and maintain infrastructure projects, including roads, railroads, bridges, and dams.

Duties May Include: Working in an office and in the field, civil engineering technicians and technologists assist in collecting and analyzing project data, preparing reports, designing projects, and monitoring project progress.

Entry Level Education Requirements: Associate degree

Job Outlook: 0% (little or no change)

Getting Started: Many vocational schools offer classes in engineering, design, computer software, and other areas related to this career. Look for a program that’s been accredited by the Board for Engineering and Technology.

14. Paralegal or Legal Assistant

Median Annual Salary: $56,230

Job Description: Serve as support staff for attorneys.

Duties May Include: Researching cases, typing, communicating with attorneys and clients, organizing files.

Entry Level Education Requirements: Associate degree

Job Outlook: 14% (much faster than average)

Getting Started: You may want to start by earning an associate degree in paralegal studies from a program approved by the American Bar Association. Some employers may offer on-the-job training. Though it isn’t required, some paralegal organizations offer paralegal certifications to students who pass an exam.

15. Broadcast, Sound, and Video Technician

Median Annual Salary: $48,790

Job Description: Operate various types of equipment for media programs.

Duties May Include: Setting up and testing electrical equipment. Knowing industry codes and standards. Communicating with clients about their specific needs. Continuing education and certification may be required.

Entry Level Education Requirements: Requirements vary; some employers may require an associate or bachelor’s degree

Job Outlook: 10% (faster than average)

Getting Started: Because this is a technical job utilizing equipment that is constantly changing, it can be useful to enroll in a targeted vocational or community college program. There also are voluntary certification / credentialing programs that can help with advancement.

16. Auto Service Technician or Mechanic

Median Annual Salary: $46,880

Job Description: Inspect, maintain, and repair cars, trucks, and other vehicles.

Duties May Include: Communicating with customers. Using diagnostic equipment and experience to monitor and troubleshoot a variety of problems. Repairing and replacing car components. Record-keeping.

Entry Level Education Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Job Outlook: 1% (little or no change)

Getting Started: Although it isn’t always required, many auto service technicians and mechanics complete a vocational or associate degree program that includes classroom instruction and hands-on practice. Certificate programs in specific automotive repair categories are also available. Many employers require service technicians to become certified by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence.

17. Medical Records Specialist

Median Annual Salary: $46,660

Job Description: Compile and maintain patient files for a doctor’s office, hospital, clinic, etc.

Duties May Include: Managing patient charts and records for billing and other purposes. Preparing billing statements. Requesting information from nurses, doctors, and other sources to keep files updated.

Entry Level Education Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Job Outlook: 7% (average)

Getting Started: Employers may provide on-the-job training for entry-level positions, but advanced training and courses in medical terminology, electronic health records, and medical billing may be needed for more complex duties. Employers may expect candidates to complete one or more certifications.

18. HVAC Installer / Mechanic

Median Annual Salary: $48,630

Job Description: Install and repair heating and air-conditioning systems in homes and buildings.

Duties May Include: Assembling, installing, and fixing HVAC systems.

Entry Level Education Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Job Outlook: 5% (average)

Getting Started: Many HVAC technicians receive instruction from a vocational school or a community college. Programs typically take six months to two years to complete and can lead to certification or an associate degree. Some techs learn their trade through an apprenticeship or years on the job. Some states require technicians to be licensed, and the Environmental Protection Agency requires all who buy, handle, or work with refrigerants to be certified in proper handling.

19. Tractor Trailer Driver

Median Annual Salary: $48,310

Job Description: Long-haul truck drivers transport goods across the country.

Duties May Include: Using GPS and maps to plan a safe and efficient delivery route. Ensuring the tractor trailer is well maintained. Driving routes that require spending several days away from home. Navigating busy highways, backroads, and crowded city streets.

Entry Level Education Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent, plus training course

Job Outlook: 2% (slower than average)

Getting Started: Long-haul truck drivers must have a commercial driver’s license (CDL), which could require passing a knowledge test and a driving test. Professional driving instruction is required to be a long-haul driver, so you’ll have to sign up with a private truck-driving school or community college program. Drivers must maintain a clean driving record and pass a physical exam every two years. They also must submit to random drug and alcohol testing.

20. Carpenter

Median Annual Salary: $48,260

Job Description: Design, build, install, and repair structures made from wood and other materials.

Duties May Include: Carpenters might do anything from building kitchen cabinets to contributing to major infrastructure projects. They must be able read blueprints, understand building code requirements, and do hands-on construction work.

Entry Level Education Requirements: High school degree or equivalent

Job Outlook: 2% (slower than average)

Getting Started: Most carpenters learn through an apprenticeship or on-the-job from experienced tradespeople. They may start out in other construction jobs before moving into carpentry. All carpenters are required to pass a safety course administered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

21. Licensed Practical Nurse

Median Annual Salary: $48,070

Job Description: LPNs provide basic medical care for patients under the supervision of physicians and registered nurses.

Duties May Include: Monitoring patient health. Providing medical care and comfort. Record-keeping.

Entry Level Education Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent, plus training program

Job Outlook: 6% (average)

Getting Started: LPNs must finish a state-approved educational program that can take a year or longer to complete, and they must be licensed.

22. Solar Panel Installer

Median Annual Salary: $47,670

Job Description: Solar panel installers (also known as solar photovoltaic installers) assemble and install solar panels on homes and other structures.

Duties May Include: Setting up, troubleshooting, and maintaining solar panels. Connecting panels to the grid.

Entry Level Education Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Job Outlook: 27% (much faster than average)

Getting Started: Some solar panel installers attend courses at a community college or vocational school. Others learn through apprenticeships or on-the-job training. Licensing requirements vary by state.

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The Takeaway

Vocational jobs can offer a competitive paycheck and an opportunity to use your skills to do something you’re interested in — or even passionate about. Another plus: The upfront education costs and time commitment can be significantly less than for a four-year or advanced degree.

Choosing a career that’s fulfilling, secure, and pays well can be a significant step toward achieving the life you want. Of course, it’s also important to develop healthy financial habits, such as building a budget you can stick to, paying your bills on time, and monitoring your credit score.

How can SoFi help? With SoFi Insights, a free budget app, you get the tools you need to keep an eye on your spending, saving, and investing all in one place. So you can stay on track as you work toward your short- and long-term goals.

Check out how Sofi Insights money tracker app can help take the guesswork out of reaching your financial goals.

FAQ

What is the best trade to learn in 2023?

Some of the best-paying and in-demand vocational careers for 2023 are also among the most challenging and fulfilling. They include jobs in transportation, construction, and health care.

What is the highest-paying vocational job?

Air traffic controllers are among the highest paid workers with vocational jobs.

What is the easiest high-paying trade?

Many high-paying vocational jobs require high-level technical skills, good communication skills, and/or physical strength and endurance. What can make any job easier is if the person doing it is good at it and feels fulfilled. Many vocational jobs have the potential to check those boxes.


Photo credit: iStock/alvarez

SoFi’s Insights tool offers users the ability to connect both in-house accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score provided to you is a Vantage Score® based on TransUnion™ (the “Processing Agent”) data.
*Terms and conditions apply. (Must click on the link to be eligible.) This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the Rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed into SoFi accounts such as cash in SoFi Checking and Savings or loan balances, Stock Bits, fractional shares and cryptocurrency subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.
Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
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Part-time Remote Jobs With Flexible Schedules for Introverts

Part-time Remote Jobs With Flexible Schedules for Introverts

Are you an introvert in search of the perfect job environment? Introverts typically focus on internal feelings rather than external stimuli, and need alone time to thrive. Introverts often have excellent listening skills, avoid conflict, take time making decisions, prefer to work alone, and feel drained after being in a crowd.

A part-time remote job can be a good move for introverts. We’ll dive into a list of flexible remote jobs, the pros and cons, and how to evaluate remote job opportunities.

What Are Flexible Remote Jobs?

The most basic definition of a remote job is one that allows you to work from home instead of from a traditional office. However, there are some variations on remote work.

Some positions are 100% remote, which means you work from home every day. You do not need to be in an office at all or travel for your job. Hybrid remote jobs are partially remote, which means you may need to travel or spend time in the office for some of your working hours.

Finally, you might have the “option” of remote work. Some employers offer the option to work from home or go into the office.

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Pros and Cons of Getting a Remote Job

There are both pros and cons to getting a remote job. Let’s take a look at them.

Pros:

•   Higher productivity: Remote employees are often more productive because they can get more work done in a quieter working environment with fewer interruptions. They take fewer breaks and experience fewer sick days than those who work in an office. (After all, germs spread throughout an office like wildfire.) In addition, remote workers can often accomplish tasks at a more comfortable pace without having to worry about office drama.

•   Better work-life balance: Working from home can improve your work-life balance, allowing you to spend more time with family, pets, or partner. Employees may also worry less about taking time off to care for a family member.

•   Saves on commuting: Remote work allows you to reduce your carbon footprint by not commuting or taking public transportation. Not driving to work can also save money on fuel, maintenance, and insurance.

Cons:

•   Fewer teamwork opportunities: Just as it’s difficult to assemble a robust happy hour with a fully online team, it’s also harder to build true camaraderie. It may be more difficult for managers to build inherent trust with a team that doesn’t see each other every day.

•   Reduced social interaction: As an individual who works remotely, you may find reduced social interaction one of the most obvious downsides of working remotely. It can exacerbate feelings of isolation.

•   Less access to IT support: If you have a problem with your computer or need access to particular software, you might have trouble finding the same type of help as you would in an office.

•   Must be intrinsically motivated: It helps to be a self-starter when you work remotely. If you need the motivation of a team or an office to get you through your workday, you may prefer an in-person environment.

Why Are Remote Jobs Good for Introverts?

Working remotely at home can help introverts find the quiet space they need to focus. You may also find there are mental and physical benefits. Virtual meetings may be less intimidating for introverts, who may have trouble speaking up in large groups.

Remote part-time jobs also help traditional workers earn supplemental income. A free budget app can help you decide how much you need to earn per hour or per paycheck.

Where To Look for Remote Jobs for Introverts

You can find remote jobs for introverts on platforms like FlexJobs.com or WeWorkRemotely.com. Searching “jobs with flexible schedules near me” on Google might even yield some opportunities.

Take a look at company career pages on LinkedIn, or inquire within your personal network. Your friends or family may know of a great connection for a remote job.

How To Evaluate a New Remote Job Opportunity

Once you find a listing with potential, how do you know whether it’s a good opportunity to make money from home? Let’s walk through some ways to evaluate job posts.

Start by researching the company’s culture and values. Try to get a clear understanding of the nature of the company’s remote work and whether that environment has always been in place. You may also want to find out about opportunities for smaller gatherings with other remote employees for professional or social support.

It’s important to find the right fit even when an opportunity is entirely remote. Culture and overall environment can vary a lot between companies even outside the office.

31 Part-time Remote Jobs With Flexible Schedules

Below, we’ve compiled some remote jobs with flexible schedules that are worth considering, as well as passive income ideas. These roles have different degrees of flexibility, salary ranges, and educational requirements.

Some of these ideas could also be good work-at-home jobs for retirees.

Recommended: Does Net Worth Include Home Equity?

1. Graphic Designer

National average salary: $50,710 per year

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 3%

Job description: Graphic designers help communicate ideas through visual organization and design. They work on a wide variety of projects for customers, such as advertisements, websites, print materials, and more.

Requirements: Typically requires a bachelor’s degree in graphic design as well as a portfolio to showcase past projects.

2. Accountant

National average salary: $77,250

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 6%

Job description: Accountants analyze, verify, file, and interpret financial records. They prepare and explain financial statements, and develop financial reporting methods. Accountants work with a wide variety of organizations, from individuals and small businesses to large corporations.

Requirements: Usually requires a degree in accounting or a related field. Accountants can also pursue further certification, such as a Certified Public Accountant (CPA). Advanced certifications may improve your chances of finding jobs with flexible schedules.

3. Computer Programmer

National average salary: $93,000

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): -10%

Job description: Computer programmers work software by writing, modifying, and testing code and scripts. They ensure that software meets performance, reliability, and security standards, update existing programs, and check for errors in code. Programmers work in computer systems design and other related industries.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree is typically required, and you must also be proficient in several programming languages.

4. Drafter

National average salary: $60,290

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): -3%

Job description: Drafters convert rough engineering and architectural designs into precise technical drawings and plans, using software. The same computer-aided drafting (CAD) programs are used by many industries, outlining the dimensions, materials, and procedures for building. If this sounds intriguing, you may want to learn more about trades that make the most money.

Requirements: Typically requires a drafting degree from a community college or technical school.

5. Insurance Underwriter

National average salary: $76,390

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): -4%

Job description: Underwriters evaluate insurance claims, help decide policy coverage and premiums, and analyze risk using mathematical models. They may assess the risks of home, auto, or life insurance.

Requirements: Usually must have a bachelor’s degree to enter the field, though experience may count in this career. Underwriters must pursue certification to advance to more senior positions.

6. Actuary

National average salary: $105,900

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 21%

Job description: Actuaries use mathematical formulas to analyze risk, including economic costs, for organizations. They collect and compile statistical data, perform risk assessments, and implement plans based on the data collected. Actuaries also use financial theory to determine risk.

Requirements: Requires a bachelor’s degree and a series of assessments for certification at different levels.

7. Data Scientist

National average salary: $100,910

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 36%

Job description: Data scientists analyze information using specialized tools and techniques to help organizations derive meaning from numbers. They collect and organize data into useful formats and build predictive modeling for organizations. These scientists extract insights with the goal of increasing efficiency in organizations.

Requirements: Generally must have a bachelor’s degree in mathematics or statistics; some organizations require a master’s or doctoral degree.

8. Desktop Publisher

National average salary: $46,910

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): -14%

Job description: Desktop publishers design page layouts for online printed or published items. They review text, graphics, and other materials created by writers and designers, and use computer software to create various documents and products. Desktop publishers also collaborate with design and media professionals such as graphic designers and illustrators.

Requirements: Typically requires a bachelor’s degree.

9. Bookkeeper

National average salary: $45,560

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): -5%

Job description: Bookkeepers keep track of financial records by recording transactions, creating invoices, handling payroll, and balancing the books for a company. They provide up-to-date information about financial transactions for an organization.

Requirements: Some postsecondary education may be required.

10. Social Media Manager

National average salary: $72,845

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 10%

Job description: Oversees a company’s social media strategy, which may involve analyzing data, driving customers to a company’s social platforms, understanding customer behavior online, increasing brand awareness, and planning digital sales campaigns.

Requirements: Typically requires a bachelor’s degree in an area such as marketing, journalism, or communication.

11. Online Marketer

National average salary: $60,334

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 10%

Job description: Digital marketers use online channels to develop a company and its products. This can involve reaching out to customers, managing marketing campaigns, promoting products and services, data analysis, and evaluating new digital technology emerging marketing trends.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree required in a related field, such as marketing, advertising, digital media, communication, website/graphic design, or English.

12. Data Entry Keyer

National average salary: $35,630

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): Flat

Job description: Maintains and updates databases with customer information for companies, compiles and sorts information, and reviews data to look for errors.

Requirements: Generally requires a high school diploma and on-the-job training

13. Medical Coder

National average salary: $54,797 (for certified and noncertified coders)

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 7%

Job description: Medical coders update patient records after appointments for billing and insurance purposes. Medical coders assign a code to each diagnosis and procedure after patient visits.

Requirements: A certificate or associate degree may be required. The American Association of Professional Coders (AAPC) offers a popular certification that covers procedure codes for billing and insurance claims.

14. Sales Representative

National average salary: $30,600

Job growth outlook: Decrease of about 164,500 jobs over the decade

Job description: Remote sales reps sell products over the phone. They find customers, use sales techniques on the customer, and develop relationships to drive future sales.

Requirements: May qualify without formal education, but a bachelor’s in finance, business administration, or marketing may be required. Companies may teach you further techniques in cold calling, finding leads, and using sales techniques.

15. Online Tutor

National average salary: $30,886

Job growth outlook: 17% over the next decade

Job description: Online tutors do the same things as in-person tutors, including meeting with students one-on-one. However, they meet with students on Zoom or another online method instead of in person.

Requirements: Depends on the subject you teach, but clients/students may prefer tutors who list degrees or credentials.

16. Freelance Writer

National average salary: $69,510

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 4%

Job description: Freelance writers and authors may write for a variety of media and brands: websites, newspapers, magazines, company documents, and more. Many types of companies hire freelance writers instead of hiring in-house. Aspiring freelance writers can jumpstart their career by trying it out as a side hustle.

Requirements: Writers should have a college degree in journalism, English, communications, or a related field.

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17. Film and Video Editor

National average salary: $60,360

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 12%

Job description: Film and video editors work in film production by editing and assembling videos to inform or entertain an audience. They may manipulate footage, dialogue, sound effects, special effects, and more to create video content for a wide variety of sectors.

Requirements: Typically requires a bachelor’s degree in film or broadcasting to work for a company; on a freelance basis, a degree is likely not required.

18. Project Management Specialist

National average salary: $94,500

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 7%

Job description: A “PM” controls every stage of a project, from planning to helping execute the final steps. They may schedule milestones, put together a budget, and assign duties to individual participants.

Requirements: Typically requires a bachelor’s degree to work for a company.

19. Information Security Analyst

National average salary: $102,600

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 35%

Job description: Talk about high-paying jobs with flexible schedules — information security analysts fit that mold perfectly. These analysts keep company data safe from breaches and cyber attacks. They create plans to protect information from cyber criminals and assess system vulnerabilities within the organization.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree in computer science and experience in the field.

20. Recruiter or Human Resources Specialist

National average salary: $62,290

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 8%

Job description: Recruiters or HR specialists recruit, screen, and interview job candidates. They might also train, handle benefits and compensation, and work with individuals once they become employees. Those who work remotely may handle the screening part of the interview process or recruit remotely.

Requirements: Typically requires a bachelor’s degree in HR, business, or a related field.

21. Market Research Analyst

National average salary: $63,920

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 19%

Job description: Market research analysts gather information about consumers and competitors and draw conclusions based on their research to help make decisions about the viability of products or services. They help companies understand the products people want, the demographics of the consumers buying them, and the optimal cost of an item.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree in statistics, marketing, or a related field. Some employers may require candidates to have a master’s degree.

22. Freelance Editor

National average salary: $63,350 per year

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): -5%

Job description: Editors can work for organizations in many sectors. They may plan and edit content, conduct research, rewrite work, fact check, copy edit, proofread, and more.

Requirements: Typically requires a bachelor’s degree in communications, journalism, or English, as well as writing and proofreading experience.

23. Virtual Assistant

National average salary: $58,991

Job growth outlook: Grew by $4.12 billion this year

Job description: Virtual assistants can work for any type of company that requires administrative or clerical work. For example, they may schedule appointments, make phone calls, arrange travel, or manage emails.

Requirements: No degree is required but candidates may need to specialize in a specific area; must have a strong internet connection and an ability to communicate on online platforms.

24. Remote Trader

National average salary: $84,838

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 10%

Job description: Remote traders handle financial investments, such as stocks, bonds, and other securities on behalf of clients. Traders must have deep knowledge of the stock market to analyze, buy, and sell investments on behalf of clients. Remote traders, who work for themselves and with their own cash, are also called “day traders.”

Requirements: Typically requires a bachelor’s degree to work for a company. If you work for yourself, no degree is required. Must have knowledge of the stock market and trading.

25. Search Engine Optimization Analyst

National average salary: $65,320

Job growth outlook: Will reach $77.6 billion in 2023

Job description: Search engine optimization (SEO) managers coordinate a company’s or business’s SEO strategy — that is, what will drive a website or piece of content to the first page of Google results. They may handle marketing, analysis, content, link building, and keyword strategy.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree and/or related experience

26. Fundraiser

National average salary: $60,660

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 11%

Job description: Fundraisers organize events and run campaigns to raise money, typically for nonprofit organizations. Fundraising might not seem as if it’s the best choice for introverted employees. However, a lot of emails exchange hands, and it’s still possible to do the job well even if you’re not the most outgoing individual on your team.

Requirements: A bachelor’s degree is typically required, with strong communication skills — but not necessarily verbal skills.

27. Telemedicine Radiologist

National average salary: $494,400

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 6%

Job description: Radiologists diagnose injuries and diseases using medical imaging like X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, nuclear medicine, positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasounds. Telemedicine radiologists do all this via computer.

Requirements: Requires a medical degree and a residency in radiology as well as successful completion of certification exams through the American Board of Radiology.

28. Telemedicine Family Doctor

National average salary: $191,202

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 3%

Job description: Some family physicians offer telemedicine-only options. The position might involve the same type of medicine as a regular doctor’s office, except physicians diagnose mild symptoms only and refer patients to other specialists. If you’re a doctor who finds a regular clinical setting to be too taxing as an introvert, a telemedicine option might be right for you.

Requirements: Requires a medical degree.

29. Telemedicine Psychologist

National average salary: $81,000

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 6%

Job description: Psychologists observe and help patients cope with cognitive, emotional, and social problems and behaviors. They also help manage illnesses and supervise patient assessments with the overall goal of achieving wellness. Telemedicine psychologists interact with patients via Zoom or similar platforms.

Requirements: Typically requires a doctoral degree in psychology.

30. Medical Transcriptionist

National average salary: $30,100

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): -7%

Job description: Medical transcriptionists convert voice recordings from physicians and other healthcare workers into reports that medical professionals can use.

Requirements: Postsecondary education certificate is required as well as basic medical knowledge.

31. Virtual Health Coach

National average salary: $48,860

Job growth outlook (2021-2031): 12%

Job description: Virtual health coaches help individuals attain health and well-being by delivering plans to achieve specific goals or implement goals prescribed by doctors and other professionals.

Requirements: You typically need to earn at least a bachelor’s degree.

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The Takeaway

Introverts can find a wide variety of remote jobs with flexible schedules. Whether you prefer a second gig or a full-time job, you’ll find great ideas on our list. Some roles require specific skills or personality traits, such as bookkeeper, sales rep, drafter, or social media manager. Others are open to anyone willing to stick it out through the learning curve period, like data entry, medical coder, online tutor, video editor, or fundraiser. Jobs requiring advanced degrees are intended for current practitioners who are unfulfilled in a typical office setting.

SoFi Insights is a money tracker app that gives you a birds-eye view of all your accounts. From monitoring your credit score to keeping tabs on your spending and savings, SoFi can help you manage it all.

SoFi Insights helps you track your money like a champion — at no cost.

FAQ

Is remote work good for introverts?

Yes, remote jobs can be good for antisocial people or just shy introverts. Still, it’s important to cast a wide net — including part-time jobs with flexible schedules — to find a role that aligns with your needs and preferences.

What jobs will allow me to work remotely?

The best remote jobs with flexible schedules don’t fall into just one category. Almost every industry offers some remote work options. The right job for you depends on your education, experience, personality, and career goals. Start with what you want to do, and then look for remote opportunities.

What is the best job for a shy person?

There’s no one best job that will fit any shy person, just as there’s no one perfect job that will fit any outgoing person. There are many work-from-home jobs with flexible schedules that introverted people may want to consider. Consider researching online, and contacting people you know about their positions before you make a decision.


Photo credit: iStock/vorDa

SoFi’s Insights tool offers users the ability to connect both in-house accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score provided to you is a Vantage Score® based on TransUnion™ (the “Processing Agent”) data.
*Terms and conditions apply. (Must click on the link to be eligible.) This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the Rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed into SoFi accounts such as cash in SoFi Checking and Savings or loan balances, Stock Bits, fractional shares and cryptocurrency subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
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Skilled Trade Jobs in Demand for 2022

Skilled Trade Jobs in Demand for 2023

You don’t necessarily need a four-year degree to have a rewarding career that pays well. In fact, there are plenty of jobs out there that don’t require a bachelor’s degree and meet a wide variety of talents and interests, from nursing to mechanical technicians.

Here’s an explainer of what exactly is a “trade job,” plus a list of 25 of the highest paying trade jobs according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What Is a Trade Job?

A trade job is a career that requires advanced training and skill that can be acquired outside a four-year bachelor’s degree. Instead, experience can be acquired through on-the-job instruction, apprenticeship, or vocational schooling.

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Recommended: What is The Difference Between Transunion and Equifax?

Highest-Paying Trade Jobs

If you’re interested in a job that doesn’t require a college degree, or you love working with your hands, consider this list of some of the highest paying trade jobs in the U.S. The compilation shows average annual salary and was compiled from the Bureau of Labor Statistics ’ 2021 U.S. occupational employment and wage estimates released in March 2022.

By the way, most if not all trade jobs require workers to be on-site. Working remotely is not an option.

Recommended: Does Net Worth Include Home Equity?

1. Power Plant Operator, Distributor, and Dispatcher – $89,410

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent, long-term on-the-job training

Duties: Control power plants and the flow of electricity from plants to substations, which then deliver power to homes and businesses.

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2. Real Estate Broker – $86,490

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent. Must complete some real estate courses to be eligible for licensure.

Duties: Help people buy and sell properties.

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3. Registered Nurse – $82,750

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree in Nursing, Associate degree in Nursing, or a diploma from an approved nursing program. Registered nurses must be licensed.

Duties: Help provide and coordinate patient care.

4. Dental Hygienist – $81,360

Requirements: Associate degree

Duties: Provide preventive dental care and examine patients for signs of oral diseases.

5. Water Transportation Worker – $80,780

Requirements: Will vary by job. For example, there are no requirements for entry-level sailors, while other workers might need to complete Coast Guard–approved training.

Duties: Operate and maintain vessels that carry cargo and people on the water.

6. Diagnostic Medical Sonographer – $80,680

Requirements: Associate degree

Duties: Operate special imaging equipment to create images of patients’ internal organs or to conduct tests.

7. Farmer, Rancher, or Other Agricultural Manager – $78,440

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Run farms and other establishments that produce livestock, dairy products, or crops.

8. Gas Plant Operator – $76,970

Requirements: High school diploma

Duties: Help distribute or process gas for utility companies by controlling the compressors on main gas pipelines.

9. Pile Driver Operator – $75,950

Requirements: High school diploma and vocational training can be helpful.

Duties: Operate machines that drive pilings for retaining walls, bulkheads, and foundations of buildings, bridges, and piers.

10. First-Line Supervisor of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers – $75,060

Requirements: High school diploma and five years or more work experience

Duties: Directly supervise and coordinate the activities of construction or extraction workers, such as miners or those drilling for minerals.

11. First-Line Supervisor of Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers – $73,590

Requirements: High school diploma, some work experience

Duties: Directly supervise and coordinate mechanics, installers, and repairers. They may also advise customers seeking recommendations for services.

12. Legal Support Worker – $73,000

Requirements: Associate degree

Duties: Perform a variety of tasks to support attorneys such as interviewing clients, legal research, and case summaries.

13. Locomotive Engineer – $72,940

Requirements: High school diploma

Duties: Operate passenger and freight trains safely. May also coordinate train activities or control rail yard signals and switches.

14. Subway and Streetcar Operator – $71,520

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Operate subways or elevated suburban trains that don’t have a separate locomotive, or may operate an electric-powered streetcar. May handle fares.

15. Line Installer and Repairer

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Install and repair lines for electrical power systems, telecommunications, and fiber optics.

16. Computer Network Support Specialist – $71,350

Requirements: Entry-level requirements may vary, but network support specialists usually need to have an associate degree. Applicants to these jobs may qualify with high school diploma and information technology certifications.

Duties: Provide technical support to computer users while also maintaining computer networks.

17. Claims Adjuster, Examiner, and Investigator – $70,960

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Evaluate insurance claims and act as an intermediary between claimants and the insurance company.

18. Electrical and Electronics Installer and Repairer for Transportation Equipment – $70,650

Requirements: Specialized training at a technical college

Duties: Install and maintain mobile electronics communication equipment, on trains, watercraft, or other mobile equipment.

19. Avionics Technician – $69,860

Requirements: Some may obtain a degree or certificate from a Federal Aviation Administration–approved aviation maintenance technician school, while other candidates may be trained on the job or in the military.

Duties: Repair and perform scheduled maintenance on aircraft.

20. Fire Inspector and Investigator – $69,680

Requirements: High school diploma, on-the-job training, and typically some experience as a firefighter

Duties: Fire inspectors help ensure buildings meet federal, state, and local fire codes and inspect buildings for potential fire hazards.

21. Transit and Railroad Police – $69,570

Requirements: Typically you must have a high school diploma or equivalent, complete a transit and railroad police training program, and receive a passing grade on a law enforcement exam from your state.

Duties: Help protect employees, passengers, and railroad and transit property.

22. Insurance Sales Agent – $69,340

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Work with clients and customers to explain and sell various types of insurance.

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23. Media and Communication Equipment Worker – $69,290

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Install, repair, and maintain audio and visual systems across various industries, such as corporate offices and the film industry.

24. Boilermaker – $69,070

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Install, maintain, and repair boilers.

25. Construction and Building Inspector – $68,480

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Inspects buildings to ensure they are structurally sound and in compliance with specifications, building codes, and other regulations. May focus on a specific area such as plumbing or electrical systems.

The Takeaway

On the high end, trade workers can make $90,000 or more at a career that doesn’t require a college education. That’s well above the $53,924 dollars that represents the annual median income of U.S. full-time workers. And with a diverse range of career options to choose from, individuals who choose a trade job have a good chance at finding a fulfilling career that matches their interests.

As your career takes off and you start earning a salary, you’ll likely want to begin budget planning and setting financial goals like paying down debt and saving for your future. SoFi Insights money tracker app can help you connect all of your accounts, set goals, track your spending, and monitor your credit score.

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Photo credit: iStock/kali9

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