6 Advantages of Having a Savings Account

Sure, you could store all the cash you’re likely to need in the near future in a checking account and call it a day. But that would mean missing out on the many benefits of having a savings account.

While savings accounts don’t offer the returns you could potentially get in the market, they pay interest (generally a lot more than you can earn in a checking account), while still keeping your money safe and accessible. This makes them ideal for housing your emergency funds and money you’re saving for shorter-term goals, like buying a car or going on vacation.

Here’s a closer look at the perks of having a savings account and why this type of account likely deserves a place in your financial toolkit.

Key Points

•   A savings account safely stores money while earning interest, making it ideal for short-term savings like emergency funds or vacation funds.

•   These accounts are insured up to $250,000, providing security against bank failures.

•   Savings accounts offer easy access to funds, unlike some investments that may require time to liquidate.

•   Opening a savings account doesn’t necessarily require a large initial deposit, making it accessible to start saving immediately.

•   Money can be earmarked for specific goals, helping to manage finances effectively by separating funds for different purposes.

What Savings Accounts Are

A savings account is a type of deposit account at a bank, credit union, or other financial institution where you can safely store your money and earn interest. Savings accounts at banks insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) are typically covered up to $250,000 per depositor. Co-owners of joint accounts at the same bank are typically each insured up to $250,000. Credit unions offer similar insurance through the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA).

Unlike a checking account, which is set up for everyday money management, a savings account is designed to store money you don’t need right away, separate from everyday spending cash. These accounts typically don’t come with checks and debit cards, and some banks may limit you to a certain number of withdrawals per month.

Because savings accounts offer safety, liquidity, and interest, they can be a great place for setting aside money for shorter-term goals, such as:

•   An emergency savings fund

•   A down payment on a house

•   A wedding

•   A vacation

•   A new car

•   A large purchase

•   Home renovations

Dive deeper: How Do Savings Accounts Work?

6 Benefits of Savings Accounts

Here’s a look at some of the main advantages of a savings account.

1. You Earn Interest on Your Deposits

Savings accounts earn interest, expressed as an annual percentage yield (APY). That means you’ll earn money just for keeping your funds in the bank, making it a low-risk way to build wealth. Not every savings account offers the same interest rate, however. While the current national average savings yield is 0.57 percent, top-yielding savings accounts are currently earning APYs above 5% percent.

To see how that translates into actual dollars, let’s say you currently have $5,000 sitting in your checking account you don’t need right away, and you transfer it to a 5% APY high-yield savings account. Even if you don’t add any additional money to the account, you could increase your balance in one year to $5,250, just by letting the initial deposit sit in your new savings account.

Recommended: What Are High-Yield Savings Accounts?

Earn up to 4.60% APY with a high-yield savings account from SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings account and earn up to 4.60% APY - with no minimum balance and no account fees.


2. Your Money Is Insured

Savings accounts are typically insured by the FDIC or NCUA, depending on where the account is held. That means your money is protected against major losses (up to $250,000) in the event that the bank or credit union goes out of business. You would either be paid that money directly or, more likely, a new account would be opened for you at another bank with the same balance as before. This makes a savings account safer than keeping your money in a sock drawer or under the mattress, where it is susceptible to theft or loss.

3. It’s Low Risk

Savings accounts don’t offer high returns compared to what you could potentially make in an investment account over the long term. However, these accounts won’t let you down either. With many investments, you can lose money over the course or days, weeks, months, and even years. The balance on a savings account, on the other hand, will typically continue to go up over time (unless, of course, you make a withdrawal).

If you have money you plan to use within the next couple of years that you can’t afford to lose, a savings account can be the perfect place to store it.

4. It Doesn’t Require a Large Initial Investment

Savings accounts are easy to open and typically do not require you to make a big initial deposit. In fact, many online-only savings accounts allow you to open an account with $0, so you can start saving from scratch. Savings accounts at traditional brick-and-mortar banks may require deposits of $25 to $100 to open a new account. By contrast, many investments (such as real estate and mutual funds) often require a significant amount of money as an initial investment, sometimes as much as several thousand dollars.

Keep in mind, though, that some savings accounts do offer higher interest rates and low (or no fees) if your balance stays above a certain minimum threshold or you meet other criteria.

5. You Can Separate Money for Different Goals

If you’re saving for a particular goal, like buying a car or putting a downpayment on a home, it can be helpful to keep that money in a separate savings account. This helps to ensure that you don’t blow the money on something else, like groceries or clothing.

If you have several things you’re saving for, you might even want to open multiple savings accounts, such as one for emergency savings, one for a new car, and one for a vacation. Separating money can help you visualize progress toward each goal. Some savings accounts let you organize your savings into separate buckets or “vaults” so you can save toward multiple goals within one account.

6. Easy Access When You Need It

Savings accounts are relatively liquid, meaning you can access your money when you need it by transferring it into your checking account or withdrawing it at an ATM or through a teller at a local branch. That’s not true for many investments, which may take a few days to convert to cash. Some investment products, such as real estate properties, can potentially take months or years to sell off.

That makes a savings account an ideal spot for your emergency fund. When an unexpected expense comes up, you can access your funds immediately — and avoid running up expensive credit card debt — in order to cover it.

That said, the money is not quite as accessible as the money in a checking account. Savings accounts typically don’t come with checks and debit cards, and some banks limit the number of withdrawals you can make to six or nine per month. However, you might see these limitations as benefits, since they encourage saving rather than spending.

Recommended: Can You Write Checks From a Savings Account?

Is a Savings Account Right for You?

Savings accounts offer numerous benefits, including insurance on your deposits, higher APYs than checking accounts, and liquidity. Plus, you generally don’t need a large (or sometimes any) initial deposit to get started.

However, the interest you earn on a savings account may not always keep up with inflation, which means your balance could become less valuable over time. As a result, a savings account is generally not the best place to put the money you are saving for a long-term goal, such as retirement or your child’s college education. You might earn a better return if you invest that money in the market.

If you’re interested in opening a savings account, it’s a good idea to research your options and compare APYs, minimum deposits, balance requirements, and any fees. And if you have a savings account but aren’t satisfied with the perks, there’s likely a better fit for you offering the full benefits of a savings account.

Recommended: Perks of Long-Term Savings Accounts

Opening a Savings Account With SoFi

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.

Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQs

What is the benefit of a savings account?

The primary benefit of a savings account is that it allows you to grow your money over time (by earning interest), while still keeping it safe and accessible.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of a savings account?

Advantages of savings account include:

•   Earning Interest Savings accounts accrue interest on deposited funds, helping your money grow over time.

•   Safety and security Funds in savings accounts are typically insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or National Credit Union Administration (NCUA), providing protection against loss.

•   Liquidity Savings accounts offer easy access to your funds, making them ideal for emergency savings.

Disadvantages of savings accounts include:

•   Lower interest rates While savings accounts offer interest earnings, the rates are often lower compared to other investment options.

•   Inflation risk Inflation may erode the purchasing power of your savings over time, especially if the interest earned does not keep pace with inflation rates.

•   Fees and minimum balance requirements Some savings accounts may have fees or minimum balance requirements, potentially reducing the overall return on your savings.

How is a savings account most useful?

Savings accounts can be most useful for storing your emergency funds and money you plan to spend in the next few months or years, since they pay interest while keeping your funds safe and accessible. However, returns on savings accounts are often lower than what you could potentially earn by investing in the market over time. That makes these accounts less useful for long-term savings goals like retirement or a child’s future college education.


Photo credit: iStock/PeopleImages

SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Money and Marriage: Making Important Money Decisions in Marriage

Financial decisions are difficult enough on your own. But they can get even harder when you bring a significant other into the mix. After all, you both are coming from different life experiences and may have very different (often deep-seated) views on money, including how it should be spent and whether it should be saved.

Not surprisingly, money is a common cause of stress in relationships and, if left unaddressed, it can start impacting more things than just your bank account. Research consistently shows that financial problems and disagreements over money is a leading cause of divorce.

Considering how personal, and therefore complicated, each partner’s relationship with money can be, navigating money conversations can be tricky.

A great first step is to understand that financial decision-making as a couple may not come naturally, and that’s completely fine. These conversations take practice. What follows are a few strategies to try and some ideas to keep in mind when making financial decisions with your partner.

Key Points

•   Financial decisions can be more challenging when involving a partner due to differing backgrounds and views on money.

•   Common causes of financial disputes among couples include budgeting, spending, and handling past debts.

•   Effective strategies for couples include scheduling money discussions, writing down feelings about money, and actively listening to each other.

•   Compromise and joint decision-making can strengthen the relationship and improve financial outcomes.

•   Implementing a financial plan with clear actions can help couples achieve their shared financial goals.

Common Causes of Couple Money Fights

Whether you and your partner are struggling to make a particular money decision or generally don’t see eye to eye on money, know that money fights are normal and common. Here’s a look at some of the most common hot button issues for couples.

💡 Quick Tip: Don’t think too hard about your money. Automate your budgeting, saving, and spending with SoFi’s seamless and secure mobile banking app.

Sharing Account Information

Some couples struggle with privacy limits and may disagree about what level of access their partner should have to their financial accounts. If one partner feels they don’t have fair access to financial accounts, passwords, and paperwork, resentment can build.

Married couples in particular may find it confusing and challenging to not have a full picture of their complete financial health.

Determining Budgeting and Spending Limits

Maybe one of you likes to spend and enjoy life, while the other prefers to save for a rainy day. This disconnect happens all the time. Not all couples agree on how much they should be spending versus putting aside for the future and this can lead to anger and tension.

Dealing With Past Debt

If one partner brings a sizable amount of debt into the relationship, couples may disagree about who is responsible for paying off the debt.

You might take some solace in knowing that debts brought into a marriage stay with the person who incurred them and are not extended to a spouse. It won’t hurt the other partner’s credit rating (which is linked to their Social Security number and tracked individually). In most states, however, debts incurred after marriage jointly are owed by both spouses.

Saving and Investing

Many couples can’t agree on how much money they should save each month, as well as how they should be saving it. One partner may feel investing is the best path to a stronger financial future, while the other might be more risk averse, preferring to stash extra funds in a high-yield savings account.

Get up to $300 when you bank with SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings Account with direct deposit and get up to a $300 cash bonus. Plus, get up to 4.60% APY on your cash!


7 Tips for Making Financial Decisions as a Couple

Just having a conversation about money with your significant other can be fraught. Coming to an agreement on how to manage your money is often even harder. Fortunately, these eight strategies can help you find common ground.

1. Make a Date to Talk

Your instincts might tell you to dive headfirst into a big money talk in order to get it the heck out of the way. But this may not be your best strategy. No one is their best self when they feel caught off guard. A conversation about a tough financial decision will likely be more productive when there are two calm, prepared people at the table.

Instead of bringing up the topic of money out of the blue, you might give your partner some notice. You can simply set a time to talk about the financial decision at hand. Or, you might want to turn it into a real “date” and treat yourself to a coffee at the local shop or pick up your favorite take-out dinner. Either way, the most important thing is that you have a designated time for the talk. This strategy can be applied to discussing one particular financial decision, or you can utilize it on a regular basis.

Recommended: How to Make Talking About Finances Fun, Not a Fight

2. Write It Out

Sometimes, it’s simply hard to communicate how you feel. This is especially true for topics that affect us deeply and in confusing ways, like money. If you and your partner are people that like to put their feelings down in writing, consider writing each other a letter prior to your financial “date.”

In your letter, you might include some background on how you were raised to think about money, your money stressors, and your financial goals. Focus the letter on yourself and from where your financial beliefs stem.

Not only will this help your partner understand where you are coming from, but it can also provide you with some very useful introspection about money and your system of values.

3. Be Prepared to Listen

When making financial decisions, your main objective should not be to explain your point of view. To have a truly productive conversation, you must be committed to listening, too. This is good practice in all conversations with your partner and loved ones, but especially when talking about financial decisions.

Here’s the thing about making financial decisions: It’s rarely black and white and, generally, there is no right and no wrong. Being open to listening often translates into being open to learning.

Not only is your partner’s perspective important, but you might even be able to learn something from them. We’re all learning as we go anyway, and by listening, you have a chance to learn and evolve as a couple.

Recommended: How to Budget As a Couple and Why It’s Important

4. Be Communicative

One key to having a productive and healthy conversation regarding money or a specific financial decision with your partner is to communicate your feelings, thoughts, and fears. Something that seems obvious to you may not be obvious to them, so give your partner the benefit of explaining yourself in a calm and thorough way.

When you communicate, try to stick with talking about how you feel regarding a matter and avoid making declarations about what your partner has done in the past or what you’re hoping that they will do in the future.

Making comments about how a person is spending can quickly turn accusatory, putting them on the defensive. Even when having tough conversations, do your best to remove judgment from the equation.

Also, it’s best not to assume that just because you have explained something to your partner once, that they understand what you mean and where you are coming from. Don’t lose your cool if you have to remind your partner what’s important or a priority to you, especially if your priorities don’t align on this particular issue.

Recommended: Guide to Improving Your Money Mindset

5. Crunch the Numbers

Sometimes, the numbers help guide financial decision-making within a relationship. It can be worth taking the time to figure out exactly how each financial decision would play out over the short and long term.

By breaking big costs down into monthly numbers, you and your partner can see on paper what is possible (and what isn’t). The exercise may provide a new perspective altogether or, at the very least, get you on the same page regarding the different options with your money.

If you feel at a loss for what you should be focusing on or how to accomplish your goals, you may want to hire a financial expert, such as a credentialed financial planner. Some financial guidance from a person skilled in financial planning could be just what a couple needs to step up their money game.

6. Compromise

If you’re in a partnership, you already know that compromise is key. The good news is that with money, compromising is not only possible but often ideal. For example, you don’t have to pick just one savings goal to work on at a time. Financial decisions don’t have to be one or the other. Indeed, a multi-pronged approach is often the best way to build financial security.

Also, know that there is no perfect formula for how a couple makes financial decisions. Just because your best friend and her spouse divide their finances in a certain way or prioritize certain money goals over others doesn’t mean that you have to do it this way. Part of compromise with your partner is abandoning the idea that your partnership should work like anyone else’s.

7. Put Plans Into Action

Once you’ve hashed out your money goals and fears with your honey, and made some key financial decisions together, it’s a good idea to come up with an actionable plan to make your shared goals a reality.

If you’ve decided that you want to purchase a home in two years, for example, figure out how much of a downpayment you’ll need and, then, how much money you need to siphon into savings each month to reach your goal. You might then set up an automatic transfer from your checking account(s) and into your joint savings account each month.

A fringe benefit of making financial decisions as a couple is that you have a built-in accountability buddy to make sure you follow through on your plan and don’t spend that savings on something else.

Smart Money Decisions Couples Make

Here’s a look at some smart money moves you may want to make as a couple:

•   Opening joint accounts: Having at least one joint bank account can simplify your finances and make it easier to work towards your shared goals. That said, you don’t have to merge everything. You might decide to keep individual accounts for personal use — this gives each partner some freedom to spend on themselves without having to explain their expenditures.

•   Labeling your savings: Having separate savings accounts for separate goals (even giving them labels, like a “downpayment” or “vacation” account) can help you stay on track and reach your goals sooner. Some savings accounts have a sub-savings account feature, which allows you to split funds in one primary savings account into separate categories.

•   Automate your savings: It can be smart to set up recurring automated transfers from your checking account(s) to your savings and investment accounts based on your goals.

•   Increasing your emergency reserve: Your emergency fund should be large enough to cover living expenses — for both of you and any dependents — for anywhere from a few months to a year, depending on your situation.

Recommended: Survey Says: Couples That Pool Finances Are Happier

The Takeaway

Talking about money with your partner isn’t always easy, but having honest discussions about your financial situation and goals is critical. This can help you better understand each other, make important financial decisions as a couple, and come up with a plan that can make your shared goals and dreams a reality.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.


Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

Should married couples make financial decisions together?

Even if you don’t merge all of your money, it can be a good idea to work together on some key financial decisions that will impact both of your futures. Making financial decisions together can have multiple benefits, including increased closeness and trust, less conflict over money, and better financial outcomes.

How should money be split in a relationship?

There are several methods couples can use to manage money and cover their living expenses. One option is to merge all or some of your funds in a joint bank account and use it to pay for shared expenses. Another option is to keep separate accounts, but have each partner make equal payments towards shared expenses.

A third approach you might consider is to split bills proportionally based on each partner’s income. So if one partner makes 70% of the total household income, they would then cover 70% of shared expenses, while the other partner would pay for 30%.

What are financial red flags in a relationship?

Financial red flags are money issues that are either currently causing problems in a relationship or have the potential to do so in the future. While they are not necessarily deal-breakers, they are harbingers of future relationship and financial strain. If you notice any of the following six signs, it’s important to deal with them promptly, ideally before your life is too intertwined with your partner’s.

•   Unwillingness to discuss money

•   Excessive credit card or other debt

•   Flaunting their wealth

•   Severe frugality

•   Using money to manipulate or shame

•   Keeping secrets or telling lies about money


SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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How to Save Money: 33 Easy Ways

You likely agree that saving money is a good idea. Putting extra cash aside every month can help you reach your financial goals, whether that’s building an emergency fund, going on vacation, or putting a down payment on a car or home.

But wanting to save money and actually doing it are two very different things. It’s easy to get caught up in day-to-day needs (and wants), and never gain any traction on savings. But don’t give up. We’ve got 33 tricks and tips that can make saving simple and pain-free. The best part — you can get started as soon as today.

Key Points

•   Tracking your spending helps identify areas where you can cut back and save more effectively.

•   Selling unused items can generate extra cash and declutter your space.

•   Setting specific savings goals with target dates can motivate consistent saving habits.

•   Buying generic brands instead of name brands can significantly reduce spending.

•   Automating your savings ensures a consistent transfer of funds into your savings account.

Saving Money Doesn’t Have to Be Overwhelming

While spending less and saving more admittedly sounds painful, it doesn’t have to be that hard. You don’t have to go to the extremes like never shopping or having fun. Just making a few small changes in your day-to-day spending habits can actually add up to a big difference in how much you save each month.

Getting better with money is like any type of behavior modification — the key to lasting change is to make small, incremental changes that stick.

💡 Quick Tip: Help your money earn more money! Opening a bank account online often gets you higher-than-average rates.

33 Easy Ways to Save Money

What follows are 33 simple money-saving tips you can start working on right now.

1. Tracking Your Spending

One of the best ways to spend less and save more is to take a close look at where your money is currently going. You can track your spending by scanning your checking account and credit card statements over the last few months. But a simpler way is to use a budgeting app that syncs with your accounts and keeps track of what you spend in different categories in real time.

Once you have a big-picture idea of your cash flow, you can make adjustments. Spending a lot more on takeout than you thought? Commit to cooking one or two more nights per week. Is keeping up with fashion killing your budget? You may want to focus on spending less on clothing.

2. Selling Items You Never Use

An simple way to earn some extra cash is to periodically sell gently used items you no longer want or need. You might organize a yard sale or resell your items piecemeal via online marketplaces like OfferUp, Facebook Marketplace, or eBay. If you have extra clothes, shoes, or accessories in good condition, consider listing them on Poshmark or thredUP. Selling your unwanted stuff is essentially getting paid for clearing out clutter.

3. Limiting Time Spent on Social Media

Watching influencers take luxury vacations and promote their favorite products can prompt you to spend more and live beyond your means. In fact, recent research finds that social media can significantly impact your finances — and not in a good way.

Putting a time limit on daily phone scrolling, on the other hand, can automatically lead to less spending and more saving. It also frees up time for activities that can truly enhance your life, like reading, exercising, seeing (real) friends, even taking up side hustle (and earning more money).

4. Setting Goals for Saving

When we do things with focus, intention, and a clear goal in mind, we usually have an easier time making it happen. Instead of saving for the sake of saving, consider setting specific savings goals with target dates and amounts. For instance, maybe you want to save $5,000 for a summer vacation or $2,000 for a new computer.

By setting a target date, you can work backward and figure out exactly how much you need to set aside regularly. For example, if you want a new laptop in eight months, and it will cost you about $2,000, you’ll need to save $250 a month or about $60 a week.

Earn up to 4.60% APY with a high-yield savings account from SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings account and earn up to 4.60% APY - with no minimum balance and no account fees.


5. Buying Generic Brands

Generic brands typically have the same ingredients and offer comparable quality to name brands but for a fraction of the price. For example, generic drugs usually cost 80% to 85% less than their brand-name counterparts. During your next supermarket or drugstore visit, try to go generic whenever it’s offered. Chances are, the only difference you’ll notice is less money draining out of your checking account.

6. Comparison Shopping

Spending a bit of extra time comparison shopping can help you scoop up the best deals and avoid paying full price. You can do it on your phone while you shop in-store. For online shopping, consider installing a browser extension that helps you find the lowest prices and automatically applies coupons and cash-back options at checkout. Many of these tools will also alert you when the price of an item you intend to purchase drops.

7. Automating Your Savings

Rather than transfer money to your savings account whenever you think of it, consider putting your savings on autopilot. Simply set up a recurring transfer from your checking account to your savings account for the same day each month (perhaps right after you get paid). It’s fine to start small. Even $50 can add up to a sizable sum over time, since the transfer happens every month without fail.

8. Making Monthly Debt Payments

While it’s not directly putting money into your bank account, making on-time, consistent payments on your debt means you’ll pay it off quicker. Once your debt is paid off, the money you are currently spending on principal/interest can go towards savings. In addition to your monthly minimum payments, try to put extra payments towards high-interest debt each month. You’ll whittle those balances down faster and save on interest.

9. Delaying Gratification

If you see something you want to buy but don’t actually need, consider putting off the purchase for at least one week (or ideally 30 days). Tell yourself that if you still want the item and can afford it after the waiting period, you can go ahead and buy it. Chances are good that once that waiting period is over, you’ll no longer have a burning need to purchase the item and simply move on.

10. Meal Planning

If it’s 6pm, you’re tired from a full day of work, and have no food in the house, you’ll probably seek out the path of least resistance — getting takeout or eating out. Your best defense against overspending on food is to sit down every Sunday to scan recipes and come up with a meal plan for the week (including breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks). You can then make a shopping list and hit the store.

Recommended: Examining the Price of Eating at Home Versus Eating Out

11. Avoiding the Daily Coffee

While it’s fine to occasionally splurge on a fancy coffee, getting your daily coffee out can add up, especially if you sometimes throw in a tempting pastry at the last minute. Even cutting back your coffee shop visits to just two or three times a week and brewing at home the other days can help you save a lot on coffee.

12. Making Repairs Instead of Buying New

While it is easier to replace items than fix them, the latter approach is better for both your wallet and the environment. Depending on the item, a repair could end up costing significantly less expensive than a replacement. Call around for quotes or ask for help from a tech-savvy or handy friend. Also see if there are “repair cafes” in your community. These are volunteer-run events where you can get items mended or fixed for free.

13. Using Cash Instead of Credit Cards

While credit cards are convenient, they make it all too easy to spend money. When you tap or swipe to make a purchase, you don’t really have a sense that you are giving up physical money. Switching to cash-only, even for just a month or so, can help you become more mindful about your spending. You might even try the envelope system. This involves labeling envelopes for each spending category, dividing your available cash for the month into the envelopes, and then only spending what’s in each envelope.

14. Switch to a New Cell Phone Carrier

When it comes to cell service, you don’t have to stick with the big names. Mobile virtual network operators (such as Mint Mobile, Consumer Cellular or Republic Wireless) typically offer the same quality of service at a much lower price tag. It’s also a good idea to look at your last cell phone bill to see how much data you actually use. You may be able to get a smaller plan to save even more.

15. Doing it Yourself Instead of Hiring Someone

Before you hire someone for a home repair or improvement job, like painting a room, re-caulking your tub or shower, or installing a water filter under your sink, consider whether or not you could do it yourself. Often, the cost of materials and a simple YouTube search will lead to significant savings.

16. Stacking Coupons

There are two major types of coupons: Store coupons, which are issued by a specific retailer and can only be used at those locations (you can find these in the paper and through a retailer’s app or mailer); and manufacturer’s coupons, which are found on manufacturer’s and coupon sites. By stacking them, you get an even deeper discount. Stacking coupons for an item that is on sale is a triple whammy that can bring you back to pre-inflation prices.

17. Canceling Some Subscriptions

Dropping subscriptions that you hardly use or are redundant is a simple money-saving move with a potentially big payoff, since these debits occur monthly. It’s worth scanning your checking account and credit card statements for recurring charges to see if there are any items you can cut. If you primarily watch one streaming service but pay for four, for example, canceling three can save you significant cash.

18. Using a Refillable Water Bottle

While keeping bottled water (and seltzers or sodas) on hand is convenient, the cost can add up, especially if you have a family. A simple way to spend less at the grocery store each week is to give each person in your household their own reusable water bottle. You can then take bottled drinks off your shopping list. This will not only save money but also reduce plastic waste.

19. Taking Advantage of Free Resources

You might be surprised at how many things you can actually get for free. For example, your library can grant you access to movies, books, activities, and in some cases, passes to state parks and other nearby attractions. You might also join a Buy Nothing group. These are hyper-local virtual communities where neighbors can give and receive essentially anything for free.

20. Canceling Your Gym Membership

If you’re becoming a stranger to your gym, consider canceling your membership. Even if you got a great deal, gyms debit money out of your bank account every month, whether you go or not. You might look for alternative, low-cost ways to get physically fit, such as walking/jogging/biking around your neighborhood, lifting free weights at home, and taking hikes.

21. Saving Change

A nickel here and a quarter there might not seem like much, but if you start dropping all your spare change into a jar every day, you’ll be surprised at how much you’ll accumulate. If you rarely carry or pay in cash, consider collecting digital change. Many money-saving apps automatically round up your purchase to the nearest dollar, then transfer the difference into your savings account.

💡 Quick Tip: Want a simple way to save more everyday? When you turn on Roundups, all of your debit card purchases are automatically rounded up to the next dollar and deposited into your online savings account.

22. Skipping Alcohol at Restaurants

Ordering a cocktail or a glass of wine (or three) when out to dinner can significantly inflate your bill. Consider getting water or a non-alcoholic beverage instead, then perhaps having a glass of wine when you get home. If you must drink, local beer, “house wine” options, and happy hour cocktails are usually the cheapest options.

23. Finding Free Family Entertainment

Taking the family to concerts, movies, and immersive art exhibits can add up quickly. Instead, look for free or low-cost community activities. These offerings typically spike during the summer months and around holidays. To stay abreast of upcoming goings-on, you can sign up for newsletters or follow social media accounts of your local community, recreation centers, and libraries.

24. Doing a No-Spend Challenge

A simple way to save (potentially hundreds) is to do a no-spend month. This involves spending money only on essentials for 30 days. Before you begin, it’s a good idea to set parameters for what you will and won’t spend money on and then commit to the plan. It’s only a month! By the end of the challenge, you may realize there were certain things you didn’t really miss and rethink your approach to spending.

25. Reducing Your Energy Use

You may be able to significantly lower your utility bills with just a few tweaks to your habits and home. Try taking shorter showers, fixing any drippy faucets or constantly running toilets, turning off lights whenever you leave a room, and washing your clothes in cold water. Once you see a difference in your monthly bills, you’ll be encouraged to carry on and find more ways to cut energy use.

26. Adjusting Your Tax Withholdings.

If you typically get a refund after doing your taxes, you’re essentially giving the government an interest-free loan. That’s money that could be working for you by earning interest in a high-yield savings account. Revisit your withholdings and put that extra money into your own bank account.

27. Taking a Staycation Instead of a Vacation

It may sound boring, but you’d be surprised how much a staycation can feel like a fun and luxurious getaway. The key is to take a complete break from your daily routine, change up the scenery, and spend time doing things you truly enjoy. This can provide the respite you’ve been longing for — minus the headaches of travel — and for a fraction of the price.

28. Finding Cheap Ways to Reward Yourself

If you focus too hard on saving and never on fun, you might end up feeling deprived and give up on the whole project. Instead, allow yourself to celebrate small money wins and life events on the cheap. For instance, for every X amount you’ve put away into your emergency fund, you might reward yourself with a fancy coffee, a $5 “spree” at the dollar store, or getting a treat at your favorite ice cream shop.

29. Avoiding Bank Fees

Overdraft fees, ATM fees, and monthly maintenance fees can make your bank account balance move in the wrong direction — down instead of up. To ditch costly overdraft fees, keep regular tabs on your checking account to make sure you have enough to cover your debits and checks. To eliminate other fees, you may want to look for a bank account that doesn’t charge monthly maintenance fees and ATM fees.

30. Haggling

Negotiating prices isn’t just for buying cars or houses. You can haggle for just about any product or service — your cable and cell phone bills, things you buy in stores, and even your rent. The key to success is to come to the negotiation prepared (do all the research you may need in advance), speak with confidence, and start off the conversation with the question, “What flexibility do you have?”

Recommended: 15 Creative Ways to Save Money

31. Saving Your Windfalls

It can be tempting to go hog wild and spend your windfalls. But next time you get a work bonus, cash gift, or tax refund (which you actually want to avoid, see tip #26), consider spending a small percentage of it on something frivolous and fun, then putting the rest into your savings account. This can help you reach your savings goals significantly faster.

Recommended: The Fastest Ways to Get a Tax Refund

32. Timing Your Purchases Right

If you want to buy something that you don’t need right away, it’s worth researching the best times of the year for deals and sales. For example, you can often find great deals on cars in May, October, November and December; clothes are typically cheapest at the end of any season; and the end and the very beginning of the year are generally the best times to buy appliances.

33. Switching to a High-Yield Savings Account

If your extra cash is sitting in a traditional savings account, you’re missing out on a free source of extra cash. A high-yield savings account is a type of savings that you can open at many banks and credit unions. But it differs from a traditional savings account in that it offers an annual percentage yield (APY) that’s 10 to 20 times higher. If, for example, you put $25,000 into a savings account with a 4.60% APY, you’ll earn an extra $177.78 by the end of the year — just for letting the money sit in the bank.

Saving Money with SoFi

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.


Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

Why is saving money important?

Saving money enables you to build an emergency fund that protects you against the unexpected. It also allows you to work towards — and achieve — future goals, such as buying a car or home, sending your kids to college, and being able to one day retire.

How can I find the motivation to save money?

To find the motivation to save money, it helps to set specific goals. Think about the things you want to buy or do in the next year or two and how much these things will cost. You can then determine how much you need to set aside each month to reach your goals. Watching your savings account balance go up can also help keep you motivated.

What are the consequences of not saving money?

When you don’t have a cushion of savings, any bump in the road (such as a car or home repair, trip to the ER, or loss of income) can force you to run up credit card debt. This can lead to a debt spiral that can take months, if not years, to recover from. Not saving also means you won’t make any progress towards your financial goals and simply continue living paycheck to paycheck.


Photo credit: iStock/Chaninan Boongate

SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

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What Is a High-Yield Checking Account?

What Is a High-Yield Checking Account?

A high-yield checking account is a secure place to deposit, store, and withdraw money, but with an enhanced interest rate vs. other similar accounts. Typically, money in a checking account doesn’t earn any interest — or maybe a nominal fraction of a percent.

With a high-yield checking account, there’s the potential to turn your regular deposit account into a passive income machine. While it’s unlikely to make you rich, a high-yield checking account can help pad your pockets with a few extra interest dollars, which can add up over time.

However, these accounts can come with certain conditions that may or may not make them the right choice for you. Here’s what you need to know.

Key Points

•   High-yield checking accounts offer significantly higher interest rates compared to traditional checking accounts, potentially reaching up to 5.00% APY.

•   These accounts can transform regular checking into a source of passive income, though they won’t make you rich.

•   To avoid monthly fees and earn interest, account holders may need to meet specific requirements such as maintaining a minimum balance or making a certain number of transactions.

•   Online banks frequently offer these accounts with fewer fees and conditions compared to traditional banks.

•   Despite the potential for higher returns, the interest rates on these accounts generally do not compare to those possible through investments in stocks and bonds.

How High-Yield Checking Accounts Work

High-yield checking accounts, as their name implies, are checking accounts that offer a high “yield,” or interest rate, on the balance held in the account.

Whereas the national average for an interest-bearing checking account is about 0.07% APY (annual percentage yield) per the FDIC, a high-yield account might offer 3% to 5% APY or even higher — which still might not make you a fortune, but is a significant upgrade and on a par with some savings accounts.

High-yield checking accounts make it possible to create a passive income stream, albeit a small one, just by holding money in your checking account (which you likely already do). A high-yield checking account can augment interest earnings from other financial products you may hold, such as a high-interest savings account or investments like high-yield bonds.

However, there can be account minimums to contend with or potential fees.

Does a High-Yield Checking Account Come With Fees?

Although some high-yield checking accounts come with monthly maintenance fees that could easily eclipse whatever interest you stand to earn, these fees can commonly be waived so long as you maintain a certain minimum monthly balance or meet other requirements. These may include making a certain number of debit card transactions or receiving a certain threshold in direct-deposit income each month.

These days, there are even some free high-yield checking accounts — usually offered through online banks — but the level of interest you’ll earn may depend on your ability to meet the same kind of transaction minimums we just mentioned. (If you don’t meet the requirements, you might not earn any interest at all.)

So, in short, while you might not have to pay for your high-yield checking account, you’ll likely need to perform the basic minimum monthly transaction requirements in order to glean the full benefits of the account.

Get up to $300 when you bank with SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings Account with direct deposit and get up to a $300 cash bonus. Plus, get up to 4.60% APY on your cash!


Top 3 Pros of a High-Yield Checking Account

High-yield checking accounts can be very beneficial — here’s how.

1. More Earnings

These accounts offer an opportunity for interest earnings simply by holding a checking account. In some cases, the interest rate may rival that of certain kinds of savings accounts.

2. Motivation to Keep More in Your Account

These high-yield checking accounts can incentivize account holders to keep a higher minimum balance due to interest-earning requirements — which can help you generate a cash cushion.

3. Availability

These accounts are becoming increasingly available, especially thanks to the proliferation of online-only banks. You likely don’t need to invest much time and energy in research when looking for one.

Cons of a High-Yield Checking Account

On the other side of the coin (pun totally intended), high-yield checking accounts can have their drawbacks.

Transaction Requirements

These high-yield accounts may come with transaction requirements to secure interest earnings. If the account holder doesn’t meet them, little or no interest will be earned. These obligations might suit your money style, or they might prove to be a major hassle.

Modest Interest (If We’re Honest)

Many interest-bearing accounts generate just a fraction of a percentage in interest. Even the highest-yield checking accounts currently only offer about 5.00% APY. Yes, every little bit helps but this certainly isn’t enough money to retire on.

Additional Fees

In some cases, high-yield checking accounts may come with fees. Waiving them may require holding a significant minimum monthly balance — which can be challenging for individuals and families living paycheck to paycheck.

Here, you can review the pros and cons again in table format:

Pros of High-Yield Checking Accounts

Cons of High-Yield Checking Accounts

Potential to earn interest on checking, which normally offers little or no earning potential May have many monthly transaction minimums to meet in order to qualify for interest earnings
Can incentivize account holders to keep more money in their accounts May have fees that can only be waived by maintaining a significant minimum monthly balance or meeting minimum transaction requirements
Are increasingly available — and increasingly fee-free — from online banks Even the best high-yield checking accounts typically offer far less than the average return on stocks and bonds (though when FDIC-insured, these checking accounts can be a safer investment vehicle)

Recommended: What Is a Certificate of Deposit (CD)?

Is a High-Interest Checking Account Worth It?

Whether or not a high-interest checking account is worth it will probably depend on a couple of key factors.

•   First of all, how high is the interest rate? If it’s just a fraction of a percentage above the norm, it may not be worth it. But if it’s a multiple of the standard rate, it might be a good way for your money to make money.

•   Next, what fees or minimum requirements are involved? If your money would make $10 more in interest per year in a high-yield account but you need to tie up funds that could be working harder elsewhere, then it’s probably not a money-wise move.

Factors to Look For in a High-Yield Checking Account

If you’re shopping for a high-yield checking account, consider these factors:

Interest Rate

Of course, you will likely want to shop around and see what are the highest rates available for a checking account. Currently, the highest rates are 5.00% or slightly higher.

Minimum Balance

With this kind of checking account, you may be required to make a specific size of deposit to open the account. You may also need to keep a certain balance in order to earn the high interest rate or to avoid fees. If that’s the case, make sure you can meet that number.

Fees

In addition, when opening a checking account, be sure you understand what fees might be charged. These can include maintenance, overdraft, ATM, and foreign transaction fees, among others. You’ll probably want to avoid being charged fees so that they don’t eat away at the interest you are earning. Online banks may be more likely to waive such fees.

How to Qualify for High-Yield Checking Accounts

In order to qualify for a high-yield checking account — and actually get the benefits — you’ll need to be able to fulfill whatever that account specifies as far as transaction requirements or minimum opening deposits.

In addition, if your banking history is marked by overdrafts and other negative factors, this may be reported by ChexSystems, which is kind of like a credit score bureau but for banking. If you have many negative factors (unpaid fees, say, or many overdrafts), you may not be able to qualify for a high-yield checking account — or other types of deposit accounts, either. (If your ChexSystems report contains errors, you can always dispute false information with ChexSystems online.)

How to Open a High-Yield Checking Account

Now that you know what it is, you may wonder how to open a high-yield checking account. The process is similar to opening any other type of account. You’ll be asked to provide:

•   Basic personal information, such as your name and address

•   Proof of address (such as a utility bill)

•   Government-issued photo ID

•   Your Social Security number or other taxpayer identification number

In addition, your chosen bank may also require a certain minimum opening deposit, which you’ll need to provide to activate the account. The bank will offer specific details as far as what documentation is required and how to deliver it.

High-Yield Checking Accounts vs High-Yield Savings Accounts

If you are comparing high-interest checking and high-yield savings accounts, you will likely want to consider the following points:

•   A high-interest checking account does generate money on your deposit, but it may come with minimum transaction or balance requirements. These could be difficult for some people to meet.

•   A high-interest savings account can offer good earning power, but the number of transactions you are allowed could be limited. Although Regulation D, which limits savings accounts to six transactions a month, was largely suspended since the pandemic, some financial institutions may still apply this rule and charge fees if you conduct more transfers.

Depending on your needs, one of these may be a better option than the other. Also, it is likely to be easier to find a solid interest rate with a high-yield savings account than with the checking variety. In other words, many high-interest checking accounts don’t offer all that much earning power.

Opening a Checking and Savings Account With SoFi

A high-yield checking account is a great way to augment whatever passive income you might earn from savings accounts, investments, and other holdings. Some interest is better than none, after all — every little bit of interest earned counts.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.


Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

Is a high-yield checking account worth it?

This all depends on whether or not you can meet any minimum monthly transaction requirements. If you can fairly easily do so, a high-yield checking account is an easy way to earn passive income just by keeping an active bank account. But if you can’t, you might not earn any interest at all — or even pay additional fees for the account.

What is the difference between a high-yield checking and savings account?

A high-yield checking account is designed to be the hub of your financial life and typically doesn’t have any limits on the number of transactions you may make; savings accounts may restrict this. However, this kind of checking account likely pays less interest than a high-yield savings account, which may do a better job of helping you generate passive income.

Can you withdraw money from a high-yield savings account?

Yes, you can withdraw money from a high-yield savings account. However, there may be restrictions on how many transactions you can make per month. Going over that number could result in fees or the account being converted to a checking account.

What bank has the highest checking interest rate?

Currently, some of the banks offering the highest checking interest rates are Axos Bank, Presidential Bank, Heritage Bank, and Quontic Bank.

Can you ever lose your money with a high-yield savings account?

A high-yield savings account is typically a very safe place to keep your money, especially if it’s FDIC- or NCUA-insured. The risk of losing money is extremely low.


Photo credit: iStock/MicroStockHub

SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


Our account fee policy is subject to change at any time.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

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Guide to Reopening a Closed Bank Account

Guide to Reopening a Closed Bank Account

Bank accounts aren’t necessarily forever. You might decide to close one account in search of better features elsewhere and then realize you had a heckuva good deal in the first place. Or perhaps your bank closed your account because you accumulated some unpaid overdraft fees (it happens!) and you’re eager to get access back.

This guide will help you navigate having a closed bank account that you’d like to reopen.

Key Points

•   Bank accounts can be closed by the owner or the bank for various reasons, including dissatisfaction, relocation, or financial issues.

•   Closed accounts might be reopened depending on the bank’s policies and the reasons for closure.

•   Dormant accounts require reactivation, which can often be resolved by making a transaction.

•   Accounts closed due to excessive overdrafts may be reopened after settling outstanding balances.

•   Fraudulent activities leading to account closure generally prevent reopening with the same bank.

Why Might You Need to Close a Bank Account?

Account holders may decide to close a bank account for a variety of reasons, including the following:

•   No longer needing the account

•   Moving to a new location

•   Lack of convenience

•   Dissatisfaction with the account

•   Issues meeting minimum requirements

Here’s more about each.

No Longer Needing the Account

Sometimes, you simply might not need a bank account anymore. For example, if you’d set up a separate savings account to save enough money for a down payment on a house or for a vacation, after you’ve accomplished those goals, you might decide that you don’t need multiple bank accounts anymore.

Moving to a New Location

If you’re moving to a new community that doesn’t have a branch of your financial institution nearby, you may decide to close your bank account and open a new one that’s more readily accessible in your new town. Moving doesn’t create a problem when someone banks solely online, but it can lead someone to switch banks if they prefer in-person options.

Lack of Convenience

Another potential reason someone might switch banks is due to a lack of convenience, such as a bank’s hours being incompatible with their schedule or the bank not having a widespread enough network of ATMs so they wind up paying many ATM fees. When banking becomes inconvenient through a certain financial institution, that could spur someone to seek a more practical solution.

Dissatisfaction With the Account

Whether it’s poor customer service, a lack of desired services, or fees that are too high, customers sometimes close their accounts and go elsewhere because they aren’t satisfied with their current financial institution.

Issues Meeting Minimum Requirements

If a bank requires you to maintain a certain balance to keep the account open or to avoid hefty fees, an account holder may opt to close the account if they’re struggling to meet those requirements. By closing a savings account with a minimum balance that’s just out of reach, for instance, someone could avoid incurring fees each month when they don’t make the minimum balance requirement.

Is It Bad When a Bank Closes Your Account?

Whether it’s bad when a bank closes your account depends on why the bank closed it — and situations can vary. According to the governmental agency, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency , banks typically can close accounts for nearly any reason without providing notice.

That being said, common reasons why a bank may close an account can include:

•   Low or no activity: Banks may place an account in a dormant status after a certain period elapses with no transactions. With a dormant account, it’s not technically closed, but the account owner is no longer able to make transactions. How long it might take for an account to go dormant depends on both state laws and a particular bank’s policies.

   After an account has been dormant for a period of time, a bank may close the account and, if you can’t be reached, forward the funds to the proper state government, labeling them as “unclaimed property.” At this point, you’d need to submit a claim to your state’s treasury office to obtain that money.

   Recommended: How to Find a Lost Bank Account

•   Suspicious activity: A bank will close an account if it has proven the account to be involved in fraudulent activity. When the bank initially suspects fraudulent behavior (whether the account holder was the perpetrator or the victim), the bank will likely freeze the account to investigate. Red flags can include large transactions, frequent account activity (especially if that activity is new or different), and transfers to overseas accounts.

•   Excessive overdrafts: If an account holder regularly spends more from an account than what’s available, this leads to negative balances and bounced checks. A bank can charge overdraft fees and require that the account holder bring in sufficient funds to return the account back to the minimum balance required. If that happens frequently or if funds are not restored, however, the bank may close the account.

Worth noting: If your bank account is closed due to a negative balance or suspicion of fraudulent activity, this may make it difficult for you to open a new bank account. Those issues will be on your record with ChexSystems, an industry reporting agency. You might need to explore what are known as second chance checking accounts in order to open a bank account again.

Get up to $300 when you bank with SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings Account with direct deposit and get up to a $300 cash bonus. Plus, get up to 4.60% APY on your cash!


Do You Get Your Money If a Bank Closes Your Account?

By law, a bank must refund to you any money in a closed account after subtracting fees that are due. Typically, a check will be sent to the account holder. There is a possibility that the bank might move the money into a different type of account.

If the bank cannot reach you about this matter, your funds could be sent to the state as unclaimed money.

How Long Do Banks Keep Closed Accounts?

For deposit accounts of $100 or more, a bank must retain records for at least five years. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that you can reopen the account within that time frame.

You’ll learn more about how you might reopen a closed account below.

Can You Reopen a Closed Bank Account?

There isn’t a simple yes/no answer to “Can a closed bank account be reopened?” You may be able to reopen a closed bank account in some situations. It will depend, however, on why the account was closed and your financial institution’s policies.

Usually, it’s a wise move to contact the bank, find out why your account has been closed, and see if it’s possible to use it again. You might be able to reactivate a dormant account simply by making a withdrawal or depositing funds (see below for more details). But if a bank account has been closed due to, say, suspicions of fraud, you may not be able to reinstate it.

Next, you’ll learn the steps involved if you do try to reopen a closed bank account.

How Do You Reopen a Closed Bank Account?

If you’ve closed your account (rather than a bank doing so), you can typically submit a request to reopen your account. This can be done online, over the phone, or by visiting a branch in person, with the exact process varying depending on the specific financial institution.

Another option you have in this situation is to simply open a new bank account, whether at your previous financial institution or at another one of your choice. When choosing your account, it’s worth exploring the different types of savings accounts you might consider.

On the other hand, if your bank account gets closed by a bank, whether or not you can reopen it largely depends on the reason for the closure as well as your bank’s policies.

In general, the first step in reinstating a troubled account is to talk to your financial institution about why your account was frozen, put into dormant status, or closed. Ask what you need to do to address the issues. You can also review your account agreement. If you believe that a bank wrongfully closed your account, you can file a written complaint .

Here’s guidance on how to reopen a closed bank account in three scenarios.

Reopening a Dormant/Inactive Account

This is one of the simplest issues to address. If you receive a notification that your account is considered inactive or dormant, contact your bank to find out how to make it active again. The bank may allow you to make a deposit to the old account, or they may have you open a new bank account.

💡 Recommended: What Do You Need to Open a Bank Account?

Reopening an Account After Closure Due to Excessive Overdraft

Financial institutions need to monitor their levels of risk. If they close a bank account for excessive overdrafts, the account holder would likely need to talk to the bank to see if they are willing to reopen the old account or if they’d allow them to open a new one. Different banks will have different policies. You may be required to pay off your negative balance, sometimes within a specified timeframe, before you can reopen your account.

Reopening an Account Closed for Suspicious or Fraudulent Activities

If a bank believes that a customer is engaged in fraudulent behavior (rather than being a victim of it), then it may be difficult to reopen an account or to open a new one with the institution. Contact the financial institution, and be prepared to demonstrate how any activity in your account that appeared suspicious was, in fact, not fraudulent or not your fault.

How to Prevent Bank Account Closures

In order to avoid your bank account being closed, it’s a good idea to:

•   Use it regularly so it doesn’t go dormant.

•   Set up alerts for a low balance. That way, you can remedy a situation which could lead to closure due to your overdrafting.

•   Review communication from your bank. You might get a notice that your account has issues, but if you don’t read it, you can’t take steps to prevent closure.

The Takeaway

Whether or not you can reopen a closed bank account largely depends on why it was closed in the first place. Sometimes, an account holder in good standing decides to close a bank account and later changes their mind. In that case, the financial institution will almost certainly allow them to have an account there again. Other times, the bank closed the account, perhaps because of excessive overdrafts, suspicious activity, or lack of use. In those instances, talk to the financial institution to see what steps you need to take.

If you’ve closed your account and are interested in starting fresh, you might look into a checking and savings account with SoFi. You’ll earn a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay no account fees, and be able to spend and save in one convenient place. Plus, qualifying accounts enjoy no-fee overdraft coverage up to $50.

Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

Can a bank close your account?

Yes, it can. According to a governmental agency that oversees financial transactions, banks can close accounts for virtually any reason without notice.

Is it bad when a bank closes your account?

Whether it’s bad depends upon the reason why the bank closes your account. Sometimes, a bank account is closed because of inactivity. Other times, it can be a more concerning situation, one that can make it harder to open an account in the future. For instance, the bank may have flagged the account for suspicious or fraudulent activity. Another reason why a bank may close an account is excessive overdrafts.

Can you reopen a closed account?

Whether you can reopen a closed account depends on who closed the account (you or the bank), the reasons why the account was closed, and the bank’s policies. Talk to your financial institution to find out what steps you would need to take in order to reopen your account.

How do I prevent my bank account from being closed?

To prevent your bank account from getting closed, use the account regularly and set up low balance alerts so you can avoid overdrafting. If your account is troubled, talk to your financial institution. Explore what solutions might exist to keep your account open and return it to good standing. It might also be beneficial to brush up on your financial habits and the basics, such as how savings accounts work.

Will a direct deposit reopen a closed account?

No. If an account is closed, the direct deposit funds will have nowhere to be deposited and so the transaction will not go through. To address this situation, talk to your bank about reopening the account and let the payer know that there is an issue with the account tied to your direct deposit.


Photo credit: iStock/Delmaine Donson

SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.

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