Common Signs That You Need to Make More Money

Common Signs That You Need to Make More Money

If you’re working hard at your job and being reasonable with your spending, you may still find it’s hard to make ends meet and hit your savings goals.

One question to ask yourself is whether you’re making enough money. Can you really afford to keep plugging along at your current salary? Here, you’ll learn some helpful ways to tell if you should be making more money and, if you should, how to get there.

10 Red Flags That Signal That Your Income Is Too Low

Do you frequently ask yourself whether you should be making more money — or feel as if you’re not making money work for you? If so, it’s possible you aren’t making enough or managing it optimally. Here are some signs that you need to be earning more in order to thrive financially.

1. Not Being Able to Pay Your Bills

As long as you aren’t renting a luxurious penthouse or leasing a fancy car you truly can’t afford, you should be making enough to pay your basic bills. Yes, it can be difficult to save money with a low income. But if you’re working full-time to cover things like rent, car payment, health care, and utilities, without any shot at saving for your future, that’s a sign you need to earn more money.

2. Using Your Credit Card for All Expenses

There’s nothing wrong with using a credit card to pay for expenses if you can afford to pay your credit card bill off in full when your monthly statement arrives. That’s a great way to earn cash back and credit card rewards.

A problem arises if you need to use a credit card in order to cover expenses because you don’t earn enough to buy essentials, like food and personal care items.

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3. Not Being Able to Have an Emergency Fund

Having an emergency fund can help you be prepared for the unexpected, such as a major medical or dental bill or getting laid off. Ideally, you would have three to six months’ worth of basic living expenses covered by the money in an emergency fund. If you’re living paycheck to paycheck, however, and can’t even start building a fund with perhaps $25 per pay period, you likely need to earn more.

4. Paying Only the Minimum on Debts

As mentioned, turning to a credit card to cover essential purchases can be a sign of not making enough money. This can lead to high-interest credit card debt, which can be hard to pay down without making extra payments.

If you can’t afford to make extra payments on a credit card or other form of debt, increasing your income can make it possible to minimize how much you owe and those interest payments.

5. Not Being Able to Cut Anything Else

If you take a cold, hard look at your budget and realize you can’t cut any more expenses because you are only paying for essentials, then that’s a sign you need an income increase. Living on such a tight budget isn’t sustainable long-term, and there should ideally be room in a budget for some small fun purchases, too.

Recommended: 7 Different Types of Budgeting Methods

6. Not Being Able to Build Savings

Even if you are motivated to save money, if you’re not able to save for retirement or other long-term goals, it could be a sign that you’re not earning enough.

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7. Making the Same Wage Despite Company Growing

If your company is growing and flourishing, in part because of contributions made by you and other workers, you may deserve to earn more than you’re currently making.

8. Not Being Able to Reach Financial Goals

If you are earning enough money and sticking to a budget, then in theory you should be able to make slow but steady progress toward your financial goals. Failing to do so could mean you’re coming up short on salary.

9. Consistently Struggling to Make Ends Meet at the Beginning of the Month

Many people start to run out of spending money at the end of the month. That’s because they’ve paid all their bills and are waiting for the next cash infusion from their paycheck. If, however, you are consistently struggling to make ends meet at the beginning of the month, when payday has arrived, this indicates you aren’t making enough to pay your essential bills.

10. Worrying About Money Consistently

Everyone deserves a good night’s rest, not lying awake worrying about how to pay the bills. If you are consistently worrying about money and trying to figure out how to tackle financial anxiety and stress, that can be a major sign you aren’t earning enough money.

Tips for Negotiating a Higher Wage With Your Employer

If you feel you need and merit more money, it can be wise to have a conversation about a raise. These tips can help.

•   Research salary data. Before an employee asks for a raise, they need to get an idea of how much workers in similar roles at other companies earn. Luckily, there are tons of online resources where workers share their job titles and salaries. It can also help to look at the salaries listed on current job postings similar to your position.

•   Make a list of accomplishments. Workers should approach the boss with the facts about how good they are at their jobs and why they deserve to earn more. Make a list that specifies some of your major contributions and use that to back up your ask for higher pay.

•   Have an alternate ask. Sometimes a company truly can’t afford to give a good employee a raise. In that case, is there something they can do to make your life easier? Can they make it possible to work remotely and save on commuting? Can they give you more PTO or a flexible schedule to help cut down on daycare costs?

Recommended: Good Paying Jobs Without a College Degree

The Takeaway

If you are working hard and watching your spending but are living paycheck to paycheck and are unable to save, you may not be earning enough money. Asking for a raise, with documentation of why you are worth it, is one path forward. Or you might decide to change jobs or career paths or even move somewhere more affordable.

It can also be a smart move to ensure the funds already in your bank account are working hard for you.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.


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FAQ

How do I know if I’m being underpaid?

Do salary research online to see what workers in similar roles and industries are earning. You can likely find this information everywhere from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to job search sites.

How much money must I earn to feel it is enough?

Having “enough” money depends on your unique perspective. That being said, you need to be able to comfortably pay your bills and cover essential expenses without having to worry that you’re running out of money each month. Also, being able to save for long-term goals (such as a down payment on a house or retirement) is also important.

How can I save if I don’t make enough money?

It can be hard to save money if you don’t earn much more income than you require to get by. Consumers can always scrutinize their budget to see where they can cut back spending in order to save more. Too many streaming services? Or pricey lunches? Try starting there.


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As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

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Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


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Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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What’s a Good Monthly Retirement Income for a Couple in 2022?

What’s a Good Monthly Retirement Income for a Couple in 2024?

The amount of money a couple needs for retirement can depend on several factors, including age, health, life expectancy, location, and desired lifestyle. There’s no exact number that represents what is a good monthly retirement income for a couple, as every couple’s financial needs are different.

Creating a retirement budget and considering what might affect your cost of living can help you narrow down how much monthly income you’ll need. You can use that as a guide to decide how much you’ll need to save and invest for retirement.

How Being a Couple Affects Your Income Needs

Being the main breadwinner in a couple usually increases the amount of income you’ll need for retirement, since you’re saving for two people instead of one. The money you save has to be enough to last for your lifetime and your spouse or partner’s, so that neither of you is left without income if you outlive the other.

Aside from differences in life expectancy, there are other factors that affect a couple’ income needs, including:

•   Lifestyle preferences

•   Estimated Social Security benefits

•   Target retirement dates for each partner

•   Part-time work status of each partner in retirement

•   Expected long-term care needs

•   Location

All of those things must be considered when pinpointing what is a good monthly retirement income for a couple. The sooner you start thinking about your needs ahead of retirement, the easier it is to prepare financially.

It’s also important to keep in mind that numbers to be used for the sake of comparison can vary widely. Consider this:

•   According to the Pension Rights Center, the median income for fully retired people aged 65 and older in 2023 was $24,190.

•   The average income after taxes for older households in 2022 was $63,187 per year for those aged 65–74 and $47,928 per year for those aged 75 and older, according to U.S. News Money.

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What to Consider When Calculating Your Monthly Income

One couple’s budget for retirement may be very different from another’s. A budget is simply a plan for spending the money that you have coming in.

If you’re wondering how much to save each month, it’s helpful to start with the basics:

•   What do you expect your retirement expenses to be each month?

•   How much income will you have for retirement?

•   Where will this income come from?

It’s also important to consider how your retirement income needs may change over time and what circumstances might impact your financial plan.

Spending May Not Be as Low as You Think

Figuring out your monthly expenses is central to determining what is a good monthly retirement income. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the typical household age 65 and older has annual expenditures of $72,967. That breaks down to monthly spending of about $6,080 per month. The largest monthly expense is typically housing, followed by transportation and food. If you’re planning to live frugally in retirement, spending, say, under $50,000 a year may sound achievable, but it’s not a realistic target for every couple.

For one thing, it’s all too easy to underestimate what you’ll spend in retirement if you’re not making a detailed budget. For another, inflation during retirement can cause your costs to rise even if your spending habits don’t change. That fact needs to be recognized and budgeted for.

Spending Doesn’t Stay Steady the Whole Time

It’s a common retirement mistake to assume spending will be fixed. In fact, the budget you start out with in retirement may not be sustainable years from now. As you get older and your needs or lifestyle change, your spending habits will follow suit. And spending tends not to be static from month to month even without events to throw things off.

You may need less monthly income over time as your costs decrease. Spending among older Americans has been found to be highest between ages 55 and 64 and then dip, according to Social Security reports.

It’s very possible, however, that your monthly income needs may increase instead. That could happen if one of you develops a serious illness or requires long-term care. According to Genworth Financial’s 2023 Cost of Care survey, the monthly median cost of long-term care in a nursing facility ranged from $8,669 for a semi-private room to $9,733 for a private room.

Expenses May Change When One of You Dies

The loss of a partner can affect your spending and how much income you’ll need each month. If you decide to downsize your home or move in with one of your adult children, for example, that could reduce the percentage of your budget that goes to housing. Or if your joint retirement goals included seeing the world, you may decide to spend more money on travel to fulfill that dream.

Creating a contingency retirement budget for each of you, along with your joint retirement budget, is an opportunity to anticipate how your spending needs might change.

Taxes and Medicare May Change in Your Lifetime

Taxes can take a bite out of your retirement income. Planning for taxes during your working years by saving in tax-advantaged accounts, such as a 401(k) or IRA, can help. But there’s no way to predict exactly what changes might take place in the tax code or how that might affect your income needs.

Changes to Medicare could also change what you’ll need for monthly income. Medicare is government-funded health insurance for seniors age 65 and older. This coverage is not free, however, as there are premiums and deductibles associated with different types of Medicare plans. These premiums and deductibles are adjusted each year, meaning your out-of-pocket costs could also increase.

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Common Sources of Income in Retirement

Having more income streams in retirement means you and your spouse or partner are less reliant on any single one to pay the bills and cover your expenses. When projecting your retirement income pie-chart, it helps to know which income sources you’re able to include.

Social Security

Social Security benefits may be a central part of your income plans. According to the Social Security Administration (SSA), a retired worker received $1,845 in benefits and the average spouse of a retired worker netted $886 during the most recent year reviewed.

You can expect Social Security to cover some, but not all, of your retirement expenses. It’s also wise to consider the timing for taking Social Security benefits. Taking benefits before your full retirement age, 65 or 67 for most people, can reduce the amount you’re able to collect.

Retirement Savings

Retirement savings refers to money saved in tax-advantaged accounts, such as a 401(k), 403(b), 457 plan, or Thrift Savings Plan (TSP). Whether you and your partner have access to these plans can depend on where you’re employed. You can also save for retirement using an Individual Retirement Account (IRA).

Tax-advantaged accounts can work in your favor for retirement planning, since they yield tax breaks. In the case of a 401(k) plan, you can also benefit from employer matching contributions that can help you grow your savings faster.

Annuities

An annuity is a contract in which you agree to pay money to an annuity company in exchange for payments at a later date. An immediate annuity typically pays out money within a year of the contract’s purchase while deferred annuities may not begin making payments for several years.

Either way, an annuity can create guaranteed income for retirement. And you can set up an annuity to continue making payments to your spouse for the duration of their lifetime after you pass away.

Other Savings

The other savings category includes money you save in high-yield savings accounts, money market accounts, and certificate of deposit accounts (CDs). You could also include money held in a taxable brokerage account in this category. All of these accounts can help to supplement your retirement income, though they don’t offer the same tax advantages as a 401(k) or an IRA.

Pensions

A pension is an employer-based plan that pays out money to you based on your earnings and years of service. Employers can set up pension plans for employees and make contributions on their behalf. Once you retire, you can take money from your pension, typically either as a lump sum or a series of installment payments. Compared to 401(k) plans, pensions are less commonly offered, though you or your partner may have access to one, depending on where you’re employed.

Reverse Mortgages

A reverse mortgage can allow eligible homeowners to tap their home equity. A Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) is a special type of reverse mortgage that’s backed by the federal government.

If you qualify for a HECM, you can turn your equity into an income stream. No payment is due against the balance as long as you live in your home. If your spouse is listed as a co-borrower or an eligible non-borrower, they’d be able to stay in the home without having to pay the reverse mortgage balance after you die or permanently move to nursing care.

Reverse mortgages can be used to supplement retirement income, but it’s important to understand the downsides as well. Chief among those are:

•   Interest will accrue: As interest is applied to the loan balance, it can decrease the amount of equity in the home.

•   Upfront expenses: Funds obtained from the loan may be reduced by upfront costs, such as origination, closing, and servicing fees, as well as mortgage insurance premiums.

•   Impact on inheritance: An HECM can cause the borrower’s estate to lose value. That in turn can impact on the inheritance that heirs get.

How to Plan for Retirement as a Couple

Planning for retirement as a couple is an ongoing process that ideally begins decades before you’ll actually retire. Some of the most important steps in the planning process are:

•   Figuring out your target retirement savings number

•   Investing in tax-advantaged retirement accounts

•   Paying down debt (a debt payoff planner can help you track your progress)

•   Developing an estate plan

•   Deciding when you’ll retire

•   Planning for long-term care

You’ll also have to decide when to take Social Security benefits. Working with a financial advisor can help you to create a plan that’s tailored to your needs and goals.

Maximizing Social Security Benefits

Technically, you’re eligible to begin taking Social Security benefits at age 62. But doing so reduces the benefits you’ll receive. Meanwhile, delaying benefits past normal retirement age could increase your benefit amount.

For couples, it’s important to consider timing in order to maximize benefits. The Social Security Administration changed rules regarding spousal benefits in 2015. You can no longer file for spousal benefits and delay your own benefits, so it’s important to consider how that might affect your decision of when to take Social Security.

To get the highest benefit possible, you and your spouse would want to delay benefits until age 70. At this point, you’d be eligible to receive an amount that’s equal to 132% of your regular benefit. Whether this is feasible or not can depend on how much retirement income you’re able to draw from other sources.

Recommended: Does Net Worth Include Home Equity?

The Takeaway

To enjoy a secure retirement as a couple, you’ll need to create a detailed financial plan with room for various contingencies. First, determine your retirement expenses by projecting costs for housing, transportation, food, health care, and nonessentials like travel. Then consider all sources of retirement income, such as Social Security, retirement accounts, and pensions, and budget well.

If you want a simple way to track your progress, SoFi can help.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.

See exactly how your money comes and goes at a glance.

FAQ

What is the average retired couple income?

Figures vary. According to the Pension Rights Center, the median income for fully retired people aged 65 and older in 2023 was $24,190. The average income after taxes for older households in 2022 was $63,187 per year for those aged 65–74 and $47,928 per year for those aged 75 and older, according to US News Money.

What is a good retirement income for a married couple?

A good retirement income for a married couple is an amount that allows you to live the lifestyle you desire. Your retirement income should also be enough to last for your lifetime and your spouse’s.

How much does the average retired person live on per month?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the typical household age 65 and older has annual expenditures of $72,967. That breaks down to monthly spending of about $6,080 per month. Many factors, however, can impact a particular household’s spending and the amount of money they need to feel secure.


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Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Guide to Prize-Linked Savings Accounts (PLSA)

Guide to Prize-Linked Savings Accounts (PLSA)

Everyone likes to win big. So what if saving money could offer the potential to win more money? Such a scenario is possible, thanks to prize-linked savings accounts that combine a normal savings account with an opportunity to win prize money.

What Is a Prize-Linked Savings Account?

A prized-linked savings account is essentially a savings account that gives account holders the opportunity to win prizes. In addition to their presence in the U.S., are found in other countries, including Germany, Argentina, and Japan.

The way that prize-linked savings accounts work is they allow account holders to enter raffles to earn cash prizes. If you have one of these prize accounts, how would you enter? By making deposits into a savings account. Currently, these types of accounts are offered by financial institutions such as credit unions in more than 30 different states.

These savings accounts earn a nominal amount of interest and aren’t a solid replacement for a traditional savings account or a high-yield savings account in the long run.

However, prize-linked savings accounts may be good for short-term savings. They’re designed to encourage people with low- or moderate-income levels to save more.

Recommended: Checking Accounts vs. Savings Accounts: Key Differences to Know

Types of Prize-Linked Savings Accounts

To make it easier to understand how prize-linked savings accounts work, here are a few real-life examples of these savings accounts that are available domestically.

Save to Win

Save to Win allows participating credit unions to hold savings promotion raffles. Every qualifying $25 an account holder deposits into a Save for Win account earns them an entry into a drawing for cash prizes. Save to Win says it awards more than $200,000 in prizes every year.

Lucky Savers

Lucky Savers is designed to motivate New Yorkers to save by rewarding smart savings habits. This program is exclusive to credit unions and is formatted as a 12-month share certificate with unlimited deposit capabilities. Opening this account requires a $25 initial deposit. Then, for every $25 in month-over-month balance increase, account holders earn one entry into monthly and quarterly prize drawings.

WINcentive

WINcentive® Savings is another credit union-exclusive program. This program in Minnesota offers prize drawing entries for every $25 an account holder saves for up to four entries each month. Prize drawings occur monthly, quarterly, and annually. In 2023, $100,000 in cash prizes were awarded to account holders.

Are Prize-Linked Savings Accounts (PLSAs) Legal?

Prize-linked savings accounts are legal in approximately 32 states that have enacted legislation to allow these types of accounts. In response to concerns surrounding prize-linked savings programs, Congress passed the American Savings Promotion Act which authorizes banks and thrifts (a financial institution specializing in savings accounts and mortgages) to conduct savings promotion raffles. It also excludes these raffles from the prohibition against financial institutions dealing in lotteries.

Pros of Opening a Prize-Linked Savings Account

Depending on your circumstances and financial goals, a prize account can offer a number of advantages. The pros of these savings accounts are:

•   Prize-linked savings accounts can incentivize individuals to save more money. Programs have found the amount of savers and savings amounts increase when there is a prize incentive.

•   It’s possible to win money that can help offset monthly expenses or may be large enough to be the equivalent of a small lottery prize.

•   It’s possible to win prize money without any of the typical risks that come with gambling or buying lottery tickets. These accounts are designed so that the account holder gets to keep their savings whether they win a prize or not.

Cons of Opening a Prize-Linked Savings Account

Along with the benefits, there are disadvantages to prize-linked savings accounts. These include:

•   Prize-linked savings accounts earn little to no interest. The chance of winning money may not be worth forgoing a bank account with a higher yield.

•   Winning any prize money at all is not guaranteed and not predictable, like a steady stream of interest earnings is.

•   These prize-linked savings accounts are often cheaper for financial institutions to offer than traditional savings accounts. For this reason, they might not promote the better savings options an account holder might have.

Opening a Prize-Linked Savings Account

If you want to open a prize-linked savings account, these are the steps you’ll generally take.

1.    Find a credit union that offers prize-linked savings accounts. These accounts aren’t available in all states and are more commonly found at credit unions.

2.    Apply to open a prize-linked savings account. The applicant will usually need to provide two forms of identification during the application process.

3.    Make a deposit. Most prize-linked savings accounts have small initial minimum-deposit requirements.

Are There Taxes on PLSAs?

There are tax requirements surrounding prize-linked savings account winnings. Sure, you can go and spend money from your savings account that’s been plumped up thanks to a cash prize. However, anyone who wins money from one of these accounts should be prepared to pay taxes on their winnings according to state and federal laws.

Alternatives to a Prize-Linked Savings Account

Because there’s no guarantee that you will win any money with a prize-linked savings account, you may want to consider these other savings options that can offer a more guaranteed return.

•   High-yield savings accounts. High-yield savings accounts are savings accounts with high interest rates. Often, high-yield savings accounts are found at online banks. Because online banks don’t have to spend a lot of money on brick-and-mortar banking locations, they may be able to offer higher interest rates, lower fees, or other bank account bonuses. High-yield savings accounts also allow consumers to take advantage of compound interest.

•   Money market account. Money market accounts are savings accounts that tend to have a higher annual percentage rate (APY) than traditional savings accounts do, but they may have withdrawal limits. Check with your financial institution to see if there is a cap on the number of withdrawals you can make per month.

•   Certificate of deposit. A certificate of deposit (CD) generally has a minimum deposit requirement. It also has a set timeframe during which you can’t withdraw your money from the CD without having to pay a penalty fee. CDs may have higher interest rates than both savings accounts and money market accounts.

The Takeaway

The potential to win prize money through a prize-linked savings account can make saving more appealing for some consumers. That being said, these accounts tend to have much lower interest rates than traditional savings accounts, and there is no guarantee the account holder will ever win any money. Before opening one, carefully consider if a prize-linked savings account can meet your needs or if you would be better off with a different financial vehicle, such as a high-yield savings account instead.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.

Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

Are prize-linked savings accounts legal?

Yes, prize-linked savings accounts are legal in about 32 states. Congress passed the American Savings Promotion Act in 2014, which authorizes banks and thrift banks to conduct savings promotion raffles.

Is a lottery account safe?

Lottery accounts are generally a safe way to save money. There is no actual gambling involved with a prize-linked savings account. These accounts are designed so that account holders get to keep all of their savings whether or not they win prize money.

How do I open a lottery account?

The process of opening a prize-linked savings account is the same as opening a normal savings account. Once someone finds a credit union that offers this type of savings account, they will apply and provide all of the information and identifying documentation required during the application process. Then they will make an initial deposit.


Photo credit: iStock/Tevarak

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


4.60% APY
SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


This article is not intended to be legal advice. Please consult an attorney for advice.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

*Awards or rankings from NerdWallet are not indicative of future success or results. This award and its ratings are independently determined and awarded by their respective publications.

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Things to Budget For After Buying a Home

Things to Budget for After Buying a Home

After you purchase a new home, there are many things to budget for, including moving costs, new furniture, and ongoing expenses such as your mortgage. Although it may seem like many of the significant expenditures are out of the way once you close on a property, there are additional costs that can add up.

To avoid financial surprises, it’s wise to jot down and budget for all of the extra expenses you will encounter when you move into your new place. To help you organize your finances, here are the things to budget for after buying a house.

Moving-Out Expenses to Budget for

Before you take up residence in your new home, you must move all of your things. Even if you pack and move all your belongings yourself, you’ll still have to spend on things like boxes, packing materials, and a truck. And if you use movers, it will cost you even more.

Recommended: The Ultimate Moving Checklist

Moving Your Belongings

There are three main options for moving your belongings:

•   Renting a truck and doing it yourself. It’s more cost efficient than using professional movers, but DIY moving yourself still adds up. You’ll have to pay for the truck rental fee, gas, and damage protection. If you’re moving across the country, you may also have to factor in the costs of shipping some of your items. Even though you can enlist your friends and family to help you do the heavy lifting, the cost of moving yourself can still be significant, and it’s a lot of work.

•   Hiring movers. If you decide to use professional movers, it’s wise to shop around to find the best price. Here’s why: For moves under 100 miles away, the national average cost of moving is $1,400, and it ranges from $800 to $2,500. If you’re moving long distance, the average cost can be as high as $2,200 to $5,700. To cut costs, you can do your own packing, which may save you money.

•   Moving your things in a storage container. Another option is to use a hauling container — you load your things in it, and the container company moves it to your new location. This usually costs between $500 and $5,000, depending on the distance and how much stuff you’re moving. Long-distance moves will usually cost more than local ones.

Moving Supplies

If you decide to go the DIY moving route, you will need to buy boxes, bubble wrap, labels, and tape. And you likely have more items to wrap and box up than you think, which requires even more supplies.

Cleaning Supplies

You’ll probably want to clean your current property before you move out, and you’ll definitely want to clean the new place when you move in. That means buying mops, sponges, cleaning solutions, and paper towels. You may also want to get the carpets cleaned or hire a professional house cleaner if the place needs a deep cleaning.

10 Common Expenses After Buying a Home

Once the move is done, there are other expenses you’ll need to account for as you settle into your new abode. Here are a few things to budget for after buying a home.

Furniture and Appliances

You’ll likely bring some furniture and decor from your old place, but you’ll probably want to purchase some new things as well. For example, if the appliances are outdated, you might want to upgrade to new ones. And you may have more rooms to furnish, which requires additional furniture.

Consider opening a savings account for the new items you want to purchase. It can also help pay for any unexpected costs, such as having to replace a hot water heater that breaks.

Mortgage Payments

As a homeowner, every month you will making a mortgage payment that typically includes:

•   The principal portion of the payment. This is the percentage of your mortgage that reduces your payment over the life of the loan. The more you pay toward principal, the less you will have to pay in interest.

•   The interest. This is the amount you pay to borrow funds from the bank or lender to purchase your home.

If you are using an escrow account to pay your mortgage, other things may be included in your payment, such as your property taxes, insurance, and private mortgage insurance. This guide to reading your mortgage statement can help you understand all the costs involved in your mortgage payment.

Property Taxes

Property taxes are the taxes you pay on your home. In many cases, these taxes are the second most significant expense after your mortgage. Property taxes are based on the value of your home, which is typically governed by your state. The county you live in collects and calculates the sum due. Usually, property tax calculations are done every year, so the amount you owe may fluctuate annually.

Homeowners Insurance

Homeowners insurance helps protect your home from damage or destruction caused by events like a fire, wind storm, or vandalism. It can also protect you from lawsuits or property damages you are liable for. If someone slips and falls on your sidewalk, for instance, homeowners insurance will pay for the injured person’s medical bills and the legal costs if they decide to sue you.

The cost you pay for this coverage will vary by the type and amount of coverage you select.

Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI)

For borrowers who can’t afford a down payment that’s 20% of the mortgage value, lenders usually require private mortgage insurance (PMI). This type of coverage is designed to protect the lender if you default on your mortgage payments.

PMI can cost as much as a few hundred dollars per month, depending on the sum you borrow.

HOA Dues

This is a Homeowner’s Association fee, which goes toward the upkeep of property in a planned community, co-op, or condo. The amount can range from a couple of hundred dollars a year to more than $2,000, depending on the amenities you’re paying for (like a pool and landscaping). You typically pay HOA fees monthly, quarterly, or annually.

Utilities

Your utility payments include water, gas, electric, trash, and sewer fees. Some bills like water and electricity are based on the amount you use every month, so monitoring your electric and water usage, like taking short showers and turning lights off, can help lower your cost. Other payments, such as your trash or recycling, might be a fixed amount.

Lawn Care

Maintaining the curb appeal of your home requires landscape services and lawn care. If you choose to mow your own lawn, you may need to factor in the purchase of a mower, which can cost about $1,068 on average. If you hire a lawn service to cut your grass, you may pay $25 to $50 a week.

Pest Control

Pests, such as ants, ticks, rodents, or mice, can wreak havoc on your home and your family’s health. For these reasons, many homeowners hire a pest control company to prevent the infestation of pests around their homes. The company’s initial visit may cost between $150 to $300, then $45 to $75 for every follow-up.

Home Improvement Costs

As a homeowner, there are likely things you want to change about your house. From painting the walls to a complete kitchen renovation, transforming your property can add to the cost of owning a home. According to the HomeAdvisor 2023 State of Home Spending Report, homeowners spend an average of $9,542 on home improvement each year.

Additionally, as the features of your home age, you will need to replace and repair them accordingly.

Common Mistakes After Buying a Home

One of the most common mistakes people make when buying a home is spending more than they can afford. For instance, you may forget to factor in utilities, lawn care, HOA fees, costs of upkeep, and other hidden expenses that come with owning a home. It’s crucial to do your research to determine extra costs and add them up before you move forward with purchasing a property.

Another mistake new homeowners make is taking on too many DIY projects. TV shows can make home renovations look easy. However, many of these projects require professionals who know what they are doing. Attempting a home improvement project could cost you more to fix than hiring a pro in the first place. In fact, about 80% of homeowners that attempt their own renovation projects make mistakes — some of them serious.

Unless you can afford an expert, you may want to rethink purchasing a home that requires a lot of renovation.

The 50/30/20 Rule

For help planning your budget as a homeowner, you can use the 50/30/20 rule, which breaks your budget into three categories:

•   50% goes to to needs

•   30% goes to wants

•   20% goes to to savings

That means you’ll be budgeting 50% of your income to go toward necessities such as housing costs, grocery bills, and car payments. Then 30% will go toward things you want, such as entertainment (movies, concerts), vacations, new clothes, and dining out. The remaining 20% goes towards saving for the future or financial goals such as home improvement projects.

Using a 50/30/20 budget rule is simple and easy. It allows you to see where your money is going and helps you save.

Recommended: How to Track Home Improvement Costs

Lifestyle Tradeoffs in Order to Budget

With so many things to budget for after buying a home, you may need to cut back on spending. Start by looking at your discretionary spending and think about where you can trim back. For example, instead of eating out regularly, you can cook more meals at home. Or perhaps you can put your gym membership on hold and do at-home workouts for a while to stay in shape physically and financially.

Recommended: How to Budget in 5 Steps

The Takeaway

After you buy a house, there are many expenses you may not have accounted for, such as the cost of hiring movers; buying furniture; and getting your new place painted, cleaned, and ready to move into. Making a budget is vital to keep you on track financially, so you can enjoy your new home.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.


See exactly how your money comes and goes at a glance.

FAQ

How much money should you have leftover after buying a house?

After buying a home, the amount you have left will vary depending on your financial situation. However, it’s a good idea to have at least three to six months of living expenses in reserve. That way, in case of an emergency, you can stay afloat financially.

Is it worth putting more than 20% down?

Putting more than 20% down on your home can help lower your monthly mortgage payment and interest because you’ll be borrowing less money. It also gives you more equity in your home from the beginning. But make sure you can afford to pay more than 20% in order not to stretch beyond your budget.

What’s the 50-30-20 budget rule?

The 50/30/20 rule means that you budget 50% of your expenses for needs (housing, groceries, loan payments), 30% for wants (entertainment, eating out, shopping), and 20% toward savings goals (retirement, renovations, new furniture).


Photo credit: iStock/ArtMarie

SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

*Terms and conditions apply. This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed towards active SoFi accounts, such as your SoFi Checking or Savings account, subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

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Are Certificates of Deposit (CDs) Taxable?

Are Certificates of Deposit (CDs) Taxable?

If you earn more than $10 in interest on a certificate of deposit (CD), you generally have to report it as taxable income on your tax return. The tax rate you pay on CD interest will be the same as the rate you pay on your ordinary income, which will depend on your marginal tax bracket.

While CDs are considered a safe and reliable investment, and generally pay a higher-than-average interest rate, you’ll want to factor in taxes when you consider how much you’ll really make on your investment. Here’s a closer look at how CDs are taxed, the impact of early withdrawal penalties, and strategies to potentially avoid taxes on CD earnings.

How Are CDs Taxed?

A certificate of deposit (CD) is a type of savings account that pays a fixed annual percentage yield (APY) that’s usually higher than a traditional savings account. In exchange, you agree to leave your money untouched for a set period of time (the CD’s term), which can be anywhere from a few months to several years. On the CD’s maturity date, you can access both the principal and interest earned.

Like any savings account, including high-yield savings accounts, the interest you earn on CDs is typically taxed as ordinary income, whether you receive the money in cash or reinvest it in a new CD. The interest earned is subject to federal income tax and, in some cases, state and local taxes, in the year it is paid.

The bank or financial institution where the CD is held will usually report the interest income to both you and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) using Form 1099-INT if the interest earned exceeds $10 in a given year. Box 1 shows all the taxable interest paid to you during the calendar year by that financial institution. Even if you don’t receive a 1099-INT form from the bank, you’re required to report interest earnings of $10 or more on your tax return.

The amount of tax you owe on CD interest depends on your marginal tax rate. For example, if you are in the 24% tax bracket, the interest earned on your CD will be taxed at 24%. It’s important to note, however, that CDs held within tax-advantaged accounts, such as individual retirement accounts (IRAs), 401(k)s, or Roth IRAs, may have different tax treatments.

When Do You Pay Taxes on CDs?

Taxes on CD income are due in the year that the income was generated. Here’s a breakdown of how taxes are handled for both short-term and long-term CDs.

Paying Taxes on Short-Term CDs (One Year or Less)

If you purchase a short-term CD (such as a three-month or six-month CD) that matures the same year you purchased it, and it earns $10 or more, you’ll have to pay taxes on it for that tax year. If you invest in a short-term CD near the end of a calendar year and it matures in the following year, you’ll generally need to pay taxes on the interest you earn on two consecutive tax returns.

Regardless of whether you withdraw the money, transfer the money to a savings or checking account, or roll it into another CD, you have to pay tax on CD interest the year it was earned.

Paying Taxes on Long-Term CDs (More than One Year)

Interest earned on long-term CDs (those with terms longer than one year), must be reported and taxed in the year it is earned, even if the CD has not yet matured. This means you’ll pay taxes on a long-term CD over multiple years.

For example, if you opened a three-year CD with $10,000 on January 1, 2024, that pays 4.50% APY, the $450 in interest you earn in 2024 will be taxable in that year. The interest earned in 2025 and 2026 will be taxable in those tax years.

Recommended: CDs vs Savings Accounts Compared

Get up to $300 when you bank with SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings Account with direct deposit and get up to a $300 cash bonus. Plus, get up to 4.60% APY on your cash!


Tax Impact of Early Withdrawal Penalties

CDs are designed to be held until maturity, and withdrawing funds early often incurs penalties. Early withdrawal penalties on CDs can range anywhere from 90 days’ to 365 days’ worth of interest. These penalties also have tax implications. Generally, the penalty amount is deductible on your tax return.

For instance, if you withdraw $10,000 from a CD and incur a $500 early withdrawal penalty, you can deduct the $500 penalty from your taxable income. Any early withdrawal penalties will be included in box 2 of your 1099-INT form from the issuing institution, labeled as “early withdrawal penalty.”

Recommended: Tax Credits vs Tax Deductions: What’s the Difference?

Can You Avoid Paying Taxes on CDs?

One strategy that can allow you to defer or eliminate taxes on CD interest is to open your CD inside a retirement account, such as a 401(k) or IRA. When you invest in a CD as part of your retirement account, your CD enjoys tax advantages and you may not be required to pay taxes on CD interest in the year it is earned.

In a traditional IRA or 401(k), for example, investments are made on a pre-tax basis and taxes are deferred until withdrawal, potentially at a lower tax rate. With a Roth IRA, you do pay income taxes on the money you put into the IRA, but the funds grow tax-free and qualified withdrawals are tax-free, provided certain conditions are met.

However, there are a number of rules surrounding retirement accounts, including eligibility requirements, contribution limits, and withdrawal restrictions, so you’ll want to consult a tax accountant before considering a tax-advantaged CD.

The Takeaway

Certificates of deposit (CDs) are a safe and reliable investment option, but understanding their tax implications is crucial for maximizing returns. Like other types of savings accounts, interest earned on CDs is generally taxable as ordinary income and must be reported annually. The timing of when taxes are due depends on when the interest is credited to your CD. Early withdrawal penalties can reduce taxable income, offering some relief. But paying a penalty also reduces your returns on a CD.

Before putting your money into a CD, it’s worth shopping around and comparing CD APYs with the current APYs for high-yield savings accounts. You may be able to find a better deal with fewer restrictions on your funds.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.

Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

Does cashing in a CD count as income?

Cashing in a certificate of deposit (CD) itself does not count as income, but the interest earned on the CD is considered taxable income. The bank reports the total interest earned on a CD in any given year on Form 1099-INT, which you must include in your taxable income for that year. This interest is subject to federal, and sometimes state and local, taxes. The principal amount you originally invested in the CD, however, is not taxed, only the interest earned on that principal.

How do I report CD interest on tax returns?

You’ll need to report interest earned on a certificate of deposit (CD) on your federal tax return using Form 1040, specifically on the line designated for interest income.

To determine how much interest you need to report, you simply refer to Form 1099-INT, which you should receive from the bank holding your CD. This form details the interest income earned over the year. If you have multiple 1099-INT forms, you’ll need to combine the total interest and report it as a single amount. For state taxes, you’ll want to include this interest according to your state’s tax guidelines, which may vary.

Are any CDs tax free?

Most CDs are not tax-free, but certain strategies can minimize taxes on CD interest. CDs may be placed in a tax-deferred retirement account, such as a 401(k) or individual retirement account (IRA). In this case, taxes on earnings may be deferred until retirement or distribution. A CD held in a Roth IRA can grow tax-free and withdrawals are tax-free, provided certain conditions are met.

There are many rules surrounding retirement accounts, however, including eligibility requirements, contribution limits, and withdrawal restrictions, so you’ll want to consult a tax accountant before considering a tax-advantaged CD.


Photo credit: iStock/pinstock

SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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