Guide to Bank Deposits

A bank deposit is money that you give a financial institution like a bank or credit union to keep safely in an account. You can make bank deposits via cash, checks, online transfers, or direct deposit. The type of deposit you make will determine when you can withdraw funds.

You can make a deposit into a checking or savings account, among others. Some of these accounts may pay interest for the privilege of having your cash on deposit.

Understanding how bank deposits work and the pros and cons of each type of deposit can help you better manage your money. Here’s what you need to know.

What Are Bank Deposits?

The bank deposit definition is when you put money into a bank account. Your bank deposits can go into various accounts such as savings, checking, money market accounts, or certificates of deposits (CDs).

Depositing your money into a bank account can help you accomplish two things:

•   It can keep your money safe.

•   It can help your money grow.

Bank deposits are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) (up to $250,000 per depositor, per ownership category, per financial institution, and in some cases even more). That means your money is a whole lot safer in a bank account than under your mattress.

The other thing you can accomplish by depositing your money is helping it grow. Because many financial institutions offer interest-bearing bank accounts, you can capitalize on compounding interest by not withdrawing funds and also consistently adding to your balance over time.

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How Do Bank Deposits Work?

The type of deposit you make dictates the process.

For example, when you deposit a check, the bank sends a digital image of the check to the payer’s financial institution. While large banks usually communicate directly to clear checks, other banks work through a clearinghouse or a third-party intermediary to verify checks. The clearinghouse organizes all the deposits coming in and out of a specific bank and ensures all deposits are put in and taken out of the correct accounts.

If the payer’s account doesn’t have enough funds to process the check, it will bounce and be returned unpaid. If you have already taken out the funds from the check, you will have to pay the total balance back, usually plus a fee.

Direct deposits, on the other hand, work a little differently. Since direct deposits are scheduled payments, the payer’s or employer’s bank will credit the account before sending the direct deposit. This way, the payer’s bank can ensure the account has enough money to cover the transaction.

Once the funds are deposited, you can access the sum the next business day.

How Long Do Bank Deposits Take to Process?

Process times vary by the financial institution and how the deposit is made. However, federal law limits the time it takes for a bank deposit to process.

•   For example, if you deposit checks totaling $225 or less, the bank must let you access the funds the next business day. So, if you deposited checks on a Monday, you should be able to access your money on Tuesday. However, if there’s a bank holiday, transactions may be delayed.

•   If you deposit a check(s) totaling more than $225 you will have access to the first $225 the next business day. Then, you will have access to the remaining deposit the following business day.

•   When you deposit a check from another account from that financial institution, a government check, or a certified check in person at a bank branch, you should have access to the money the next business day.

Keep in mind some banks and credit unions apply cut-off times, which dictate the end of the day. So, if you deposit after the cut-off time, you may have to wait an extra business day before accessing the deposit.

Also, other types of deposits have different processing time. For example, wire transfers, and ACH deposits may take between one and five business days to process.

Here are a few reasons why it can take longer for your deposit to process:

•   You’re depositing money into a new account

•   You made an ATM deposit to an ATM outside the financial institution’s network

•   If you have a deposited check that was returned unpaid

•   Your deposits exceed $5,525

•   You’ve overdrawn your account too many times.

Recommended: Causes of Overspending

2 Types of Bank Deposits

There are two primary types of bank deposits: demand deposits and time deposits. Here’s a breakdown of each.

Demand Deposits

Demand deposits consist of money you put into the bank that you can take out when you need cash. Demand deposit accounts usually have minimal interest rates (or no interest), but they give you more freedom to withdraw money when needed. These types of deposits can be made to three types of accounts, including:

•   Checking accounts. This type of account is meant for everyday transactions. You can deposit and withdraw money as often as you want. Usually, checking accounts have checks and debit cards linked to them so you can access your money when you’re on the go.

•   Savings accounts. This type of account is designed to help you sock your money away for short-term or long-term goals. Since the different types of savings accounts are meant for savings, some banks apply withdrawal limits, limiting the number of monthly withdrawal transactions that can occur in an account.

Savings accounts may also have interest rates higher than checking accounts. This is especially true if you deposit funds at an online vs. traditional bank.

•   Money market accounts. This type of account combines the features of a savings account with those of a checking account. Money market accounts let you earn interest like a savings account. They can also provide a debit card and checks so you can withdraw funds.

Time Deposits

A time deposit is when you put money into a deposit account with a fixed rate and term, like certificates of deposit (CDs). You can only take money out of a time deposit account once the term expires. (You may have to pay a penalty if you take money out of the account beforehand. But whether you get a penalty or not depends on the type of account and the financial institution.)

For example, let’s say you deposit $5,000 in a CD that earns 5% interest for one year. Then, after one year, you can withdraw $5,250.00, which includes your deposit and interest earned.

You can think of banks as using time deposit accounts to borrow money from depositors. In exchange for borrowing money for a certain amount of time, the bank usually gives the depositor a fixed interest rate, typically higher than traditional savings accounts. At the end of the term, the depositor can take out the money in the account or renew the time deposit for another term.

Recommended: What Is an Electronic Check (E-Check)?

What Are Mobile Deposits?

Many banks and credit unions now offer mobile banking, giving you access to banking services no matter where you are. You can make mobile check deposits from your phone as part of mobile banking. So, instead of driving to an ATM or local bank branch, you can deposit it on your mobile device.

All you have to do is:

•   Download the bank’s mobile banking app.

•   Log into your account.

•   Choose the account you want to deposit the check into.

•   Endorse the back of the check.

•   Enter the amount of the check.

•   Snap a photo of the front and back of the check.

•   Review the deposit information, and then hit deposit.

Remember, though, there can be limits on the amount and type of checks you can deposit on your mobile app. For example, some banks prohibit depositing third-party checks, money orders, traveler’s checks, and foreign checks. So, verify the rules with your bank or credit union.

Also, if you deposit a check using the mobile app, keep the paper check until the check clears. This way, you’ll have a backup if it doesn’t go through or there is an error.

Open a Bank Account Today

Are you looking for a home for your money? If so, see what SoFi has to offer. With a SoFi bank account, you will spend and save in one convenient place. Plus, you’ll earn a competitive annual percentage yield (APY) and pay no account fees, both of which can help your money grow.

Better banking is here with up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

What are the 2 types of bank deposits?

Demand deposits and time deposits are the two types of bank deposits. A demand deposit references deposits made into an account such as a checking or saving account where you can withdraw. A time deposit, on the other hand, refers to a deposit made to an account with a fixed interest rate and set terms, like certificates of deposits.

What happens if you deposit more than $10,000 in the bank?

When you deposit $10,000 or more into a financial institution, federal law requires them to report the deposit to the federal government. The federal government requires this alert to help prevent money laundering and fraud.

Does deposit mean payment?

Yes, deposits can mean an initial payment towards a product or service. It can also mean putting something of value away for safekeeping, like when you make a bank deposit to a bank.


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Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a deposit to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


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39 Passive Income Ideas to Build Wealth in 2024

With inflation and interest rates rising, many people are looking for ways to generate additional income these days — and finding reliable sources of passive income, which require less effort than most jobs — has become particularly desirable.

Creating and managing passive income streams isn’t a truly passive activity, however. Generating passive income usually requires upfront work, or sometimes a substantial investment to get the ball rolling. And depending on what your passive income ideas are, whether you’re renting out property or selling a product via online platforms, you’ll likely have ongoing tasks to keep the money coming in.

That said, passive income can in some cases deliver more income with less effort than a traditional job that requires a fixed number of hours per week.

Key Points

•   Passive income is money earned without active involvement.

•   High-interest savings accounts, investing in business, P2P lending, and rental properties are some ways to generate passive income.

•   Benefits of passive income include extra money with less effort, freedom, and flexibility.

•   Initial work and investments are often needed to set up a stream of passive income.

•   The opposite of passive income is active income, which usually involves a job and is also known as earned income.

What Is Passive Income?

Passive income is money that you earn without active involvement. In other words, it is income that isn’t attached to an hourly wage or annual salary. Passive income ideas could include things like cash flow from rental properties, dividend stocks, sales of a product (that requires little or no effort), royalties, and more.

Essentially, these side hustles can help you earn money without contributing much, if any, active effort. If you are paid for a service you perform, that’s active income — you have to put in time and energy in order to get paid. If you can continue making money while staying mostly hands-off, that can be a form of passive income. That doesn’t mean you won’t have to put work in up front to get started — you probably will. But besides some maintenance, passive income shouldn’t require your active involvement.

There are obvious benefits to these low-effort side hustles over traditional active income. Earning more money without putting in more hours offers the opportunity to make extra cash without burning yourself out. If you’re successful enough, it might even give you the freedom and flexibility to quit your day job and do whatever you want instead, whether that’s going to school, traveling, writing, or making art.

39 Passive Income Ideas to Help You Make Money

There are a number of ways to earn passive income. Some options, like the following types of passive income, take relatively little active supervision.

1. Open a High-Yield Savings Account

A high-yield savings account (HYSA) is an alternative to traditional savings accounts, and they’re attracting more attention these days thanks to higher interest payments that might be 2% or more. By simply putting your money in the bank, you may be able to start to earn passive income on it. If you invest in an FDIC-insured account, the first $250,000 of your money is protected. There are both banks and online platforms which offer a high-yield savings account.

Savings accounts are generally appealing because they are a separate place to store money you don’t necessarily want to use on day-to-day expenses. For example, it could be a good place to save for emergencies, or even to save for a vacation or a move across the country.

When you find a high-interest savings account, take a look at the fine print. What conditions are attached for you to get that rate? The financial institution may require you to have a certain amount of money deposited into that account each month, maintain a certain balance or have your bills automatically deducted from it. You may need to use your debit card a predetermined number of times, as yet another example — or be limited in the number of transactions that can take place each month.

Earn up to 4.60% APY with a high-yield savings account from SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings account and earn up to 4.60% APY - with no minimum balance and no account fees.


2. Invest In a Business

Although this may take an up-front investment, buying into a business and becoming a silent partner can be another passive income source.

Even if the company you are thinking of investing in seems solid, it’s important to have an understanding of the challenges the organization may face. There are some red flags to look out for, such as a company whose revenue is earned from just a couple of clients — or just one client — as opposed to several.

It’s also important to lay out the exact terms of your investment and compensation.

3. Become a Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Lender

Peer-to-peer (P2P) lending platforms are another type of crowdfunding that allows people to borrow money from individual investors. Through these sites, you can be matched with an individual seeking a loan, and lend your money at a rate that could be higher than the usual bank rates.

That’s because investors taking part in peer-to-peer lending tend to bear the bulk of any risk. It is possible that borrowers will default on their loans, leading to a higher risk if an investor were to lend money with a lower credit rating, for example. Returns are never guaranteed and while investors will receive a return on the money they invest, they could also lose some or all of it in the long run.

💡 Learn more: Understanding How P2P Lending Works

4. Buy a Rental Property

Another popular passive income source is rental property. You might want to purchase a home to rent out to an ongoing tenant or list a property on a short-term rental site. Hiring a property management company lessens your day-to-day involvement, thereby making this venture a more passive income strategy than active.

Obviously, setting up this type of income requires a pretty big outlay, and it may be a while before your investment property generates a profit over and above the many expenses required to run it. In addition, there are always risks in the rental markets to keep in mind.

💡 Learn more: Investment Property Guide for Beginners

5. Invest in Crowdfunded Real Estate

If you don’t have thousands of dollars to spend on a piece of property, you can always check out your options on crowdfunded real estate sites. These may require a smaller initial investment, and likewise the costs are also shared.

Crowdfunded real estate investments can be complex, however, and you’ll want to balance the risks and rewards.

6. Invest in Dividend Stocks

When companies choose to share a portion of their profits with the investors who own shares of the firm, those payments are called dividends, and they work generally the same way from company to company.

Typically, dividends are paid in cash (though some might be paid in stock), on a regular schedule. Dividends are usually paid quarterly, though there are variations.

dividend yield formula

Investors might receive dividends from companies they’re invested in, or from mutual funds they’re invested in that hold shares of dividend-paying companies.

There is no guarantee that investing in dividend stocks will continue to earn you passive income. As Liz Young, Head of Investment Strategy at SoFi, points out, “A stock’s dividend yield will fluctuate because it’s based on the stock’s price and prices can be volatile. You should also consider other factors like a company’s track record of increasing the dividend, the dividend payout ratio, debt load, and cash on hand when determining the overall health of an investment.”

💡 Learn more: What Is Dividend Income? Can You Live Off It?

7. Invest with an Automated Advisor

If you’re just getting started with investing, you may want to use automated investing tools to help you choose the appropriate allocation of assets for your goals.

Typically, an automated platform — also called a robo-advisor — is a digital investing service that provides you with a questionnaire so you can establish your financial goals, risk preferences, and time horizon.

On the backend, a sophisticated algorithm then recommends a pre-set, automated portfolio that aligns with your responses. These portfolios often have lower account minimums compared with traditional brokers, and the portfolios themselves are typically comprised of low-cost exchange-traded funds (ETFs) — which adds to the cost efficiency of some robo products.

You can use a robo investing as you would any account — for retirement, as a taxable investment account, or even for your emergency fund — and you typically invest using automatic deposits or contributions. The allocation in each portfolio is usually pre-determined, and investors cannot change the investments.

Tools such as SoFi’s Automated Investing allow you to automatically invest each month and potentially grow your portfolio over time.

8. Start a Retirement Account

When you open your retirement account, you can choose to invest it however you want. For example, you could open an individual retirement account (IRA).

One way to earn income in a retirement account is by investing in mutual funds. You can choose the level of risk you want to take with your money by finding a mutual fund that is higher or lower risk.

💡 Learn more: 3 Easy Steps to Starting a Retirement Fund

9. Join an Affiliate Program

When you join a company’s affiliate program, you earn a commission from every product that someone purchases from that company. All you have to do is post the link on your blog, website, or social media pages. Amazon Associates is a great place to start.

10. Rent Out Your Car

Another one of the best passive income opportunities is renting out your car on a site like Turo. It’s basically the Airbnb of cars, and, according to Turo, the average annual income for one car on the site is $10,516.

If you have a clean driving record as well as a newer car, consider getting in touch with a car advertising agency. You simply drive around town with ads on your car and easily generate passive income.

woman driving in car with advertisement

12. Rent Your Parking Space

Do you have space in your driveway that you aren’t using? Then rent it out on platforms like Stow It, where you can find people who will pay to rent out the space.

13. Rent Storage Space

If you have extra space in your garage, shed, or storage unit, then you could start earning passive income by using a peer-to-peer storage site like Stashii to find people who need your space.

14. Invest in Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)

An alternative to becoming a property owner or landlord are real estate investment trusts, or REITs. REITs are publicly traded companies on the stock market that own income-producing real estate. They give you the chance to invest in real estate portfolios. REITs sometimes come at a higher risk than other funds.

You might consider investing in a REIT that focuses on storage units. For example, one option is Public Storage, which has ownership or interest in 2,548 properties located in 38 states.

15. Rent Your Bike

Perhaps you don’t have a car, but you do have a bike that’s just sitting around. Your bike could be a lucrative passive income source, especially if you live in a high-traffic area. List your bike on Spinlister to get started.

16. Airbnb or Rent Out a Room

Even if you don’t own an investment property, with your landlord’s permission, you may be able to rent out a room in your apartment or list it on Airbnb.

travels staying at an airbnb summer rental

17. Pet Sit in Your Home

If you love pets, you can earn passive income by welcoming pets into your home while their owners are on vacation. For instance, you could charge $30 to $80 per day just for running a doggy daycare. You can gain clients through word of mouth or use a site like Rover to find customers.

18. House Sit for Someone

When your friends go out of town, they may need someone to stay in their home and do simple things like water their plants and collect their mail. You can easily make money and have somewhere new to stay for a little bit. Along with making yourself available to friends, you can sign up to be a house sitter on HouseSitter.com.

19. Buy and Sell Domain Names

Some domain names are cheap, while others cost a lot of money because they are in high demand. One thing you could do to start another passive income stream is to purchase domain names you think will be popular. Purchase low for around $10 to $100 and then sell them for a much higher price later on.

desktop computer ready to buy domain name

20. Rent Your Tools

Have you ever done a home improvement project that required you to purchase tools? You may never need to use those tools again. Thankfully, now you can rent tools, and rent out your tools, on peer-to-peer platforms such as Sparetoolz to earn passive income.

21. Invest in Royalties

Let’s say you don’t have any songwriting ability, but you would like to make money on other artists’ work. You can invest in royalties through Royalty Exchange and earn passive income on the intellectual property.

22. Purchase a Billboard

You can make thousands of dollars per month if you own a billboard where companies can advertise their products and services. Do your research and make sure you get the right permits before committing to a billboard.

23. Purchase a Blog

If you don’t have the time or energy to create content for your own blog, then look into ones that are already successful and see if the owners are willing to sell. You could also hire someone to manage your blog so that you’re truly earning in a passive way.

24. Create an Online Course

If you have a special skill or knowledge about a certain topic, you may be able to create a video course where you teach people about that topic and charge them to take the course.

25. Sell Digital Products

You may want to research online platforms where you can sell everything from digital art to e-books. Whether you’re an artist, graphic designer, or writer, you can create digital products to sell online.

woman smiling after selling art online

26. License Your Photos

Many companies, bloggers, and individuals use stock photos on a regular basis. You may be able to upload your best photos to stock media platforms and earn passive income on them.

27. Create a Mobile App

If you’ve been dreaming about an amazing phone app that you think a lot of other people would use, you may want to look into hiring a development team to create it.

28. Sell a Product

You may be able to earn passive income through sales of a product that you create. This could be a book that you write or a physical product that you design and make. You might also list items you already own on sites like eBay and earn extra income through those sales.

young woman selling bowls at market

29. License Your Music

Do you love to write songs? Then you could license your music and start earning passive income. You’ll just have to team up with a music licensing company to get started.

30. Self-Publish a Book

Through platforms like Amazon’s KDP, you can self-publish a book and earn a royalty on it every time someone makes a purchase. You will be able to set the price of your book and be in full control of your book’s Amazon page, where you can list pictures of the book, reviews, and videos promoting it.

31. Sell Blank Books

You can start selling books online without having to write anything. How? By focusing on blank books, such as journals, sketchbooks, and planners. Simply find a design you believe will appeal to people and begin collecting royalties when people buy your books.

32. Create Greeting Cards

Another artistic endeavor that could be a good passive income stream is creating greeting cards that you sell to a wholesale or retail stationery company that accepts independent artist submissions.

33. Sign Up for Dropshipping

If you want to sell products and make money online but don’t want to store any of the goods, you could always look into dropshipping to create passive income. With dropshipping, you don’t have to have much money to start since you don’t need inventory to fulfill orders for customers.

34. Start a Blog

Blogging seems like a pretty cool space to operate in and gives you a lot of creative freedom. You can make your blog all about crafts, share tutorials, ideas, and more. It’s up to you how your space operates.

Blogging might seem like too much work to many people, but it doesn’t have to be a full-time job for everyone. For some people, blogging can be fun after a day at the office — and, with time and effort, it could turn into something more lucrative.

Here are a few ideas on how you can make passive income from blogging:

•   Affiliate marketing

•   Google AdSense: Cost Per Click and Cost Per Impression

•   Sponsored posts

•   Selling products

35. Start a YouTube Channel

If you enjoy creating videos more than writing, then consider starting your own YouTube channel. Once you get enough viewers, you can begin to generate passive income through YouTube advertising.

young woman recording a new video for youtube

36. Publish an Ebook

Like an online course, an ebook is a way to share your expertise with the world. Anyone can self-publish a book online through services like Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing, iBooks Author, or Kobo Writing Life.

The percentage of royalties you earn varies depending on the publisher. Of course, the more marketing you do, the more copies you’re likely to sell — and there’s no shortage of online marketing strategies to investigate. But once you write and publish the e-book, it’s out there ready to generate passive income for you.

37. Create a Podcast

Podcasts are still popular, and they can generate some passive income for you. If you start a podcast that resonates with people, then you can grow your audience and monetize your show by sponsoring with ad partners. If you get enough listeners, you may be able to sign up for podcast advertising networks.

38. Start an ATM Business

When people are out at a bar or nightclub or they’re frequenting a cash-only business, they may need cash right away. If you own an ATM business and you place your ATM in high-traffic locations, you could start to generate passive income through surcharge fees. Typically, you could earn around $3 per withdrawal.

39. Start a Vending Machine Business

Similar to an ATM business, a vending machine business allows you to use your creativity and determine high-traffic areas where you could make a lot of money. If you buy in bulk, you’ll be able to save on the snacks and drinks you purchase for your machines.

Potential Benefits of Earning Passive Income

There are only 24 hours in a day. If you go to a job each day that pays you a set amount of money, that is the maximum amount that you’ll ever make in a 24-hour period. That is called earned income.

By investing some of that earned income into different passive income ideas, you may be able to increase your earnings. Diversifying your income stream may also improve your financial security. Some benefits of passive income are:

•  More Free Time: By earning money through passive income sources, you might be able to free time in your schedule. You may choose to spend more time with your family, pursue a creative project or new business idea, or travel the world.

•  Financial Security: Even if you still plan to keep your 9-to-5 job, having multiple sources of income could help increase your financial security. If you lose your job, become sick, or get injured, you may still have money coming in to cover expenses. This is especially important if you are supporting a family.

•  Tax Benefits: You may want certain legal protections for your personal assets or to qualify for tax breaks. Consulting with an attorney and/or tax advisor to explore setting up a formal business structure like a sole proprietorship, a limited liability company (LLC), or a corporation, for example, might help you decide if this is a good route for your particular situation.

•  Location Flexibility: If you don’t have to go into an office each day, you’ll be free to move around and, possibly, live anywhere in the world. Many streams of passive income can be managed from your phone or laptop.

•  Achieve Financial Independence: The definition of financial independence is having enough income to cover your expenses without having to actively work in order to cover living expenses. This could allow you to retire early and have more freedom to live your life the way you choose. Whether you’re interested in retiring early or not, passive income can be one way to help you reach financial independence.

•  Pay Off Debt: Passive income may help you to supplement your income so that you will have the opportunity to pay off any debts more quickly.

Potential Downsides of Earning Passive Income

Although it might sound like a dream come true to quit your job and travel the world, earning through passive income is not quite that simple.

•  Earning Passive Income Is Not a Passive Activity: Whether you’re generating passive income through a rental income, running a blog, or in another way, you will still need to put in some time and effort. It takes upfront investment to get these income sources up and running, and they don’t always work out as planned.

If, for example, you run an Airbnb, you have to maintain the property, ensure a high-quality experience for guests, and address any issues or concerns guests may have to secure positive reviews.

•  Passive Income Requires Diversity: In order to earn enough passive income to quit your job and cover all your expenses, you would most likely need more than one source of income. Although you may no longer need to clock into a 9-to-5 job, you will likely still need to spend time managing multiple income streams.

•  It’s Lonely at the Top: It might sound great to never have to go to the office again and to have the freedom to travel, but earning money through passive income can become lonely.

Not having anyone to talk to during the day might make you feel lonely, and if you aren’t self-motivated, you may find it difficult to stay on task if you need to manage your passive income streams.

•  Getting Started May Require Investment: Depending on how you plan to create passive income, it may require an initial financial investment. You may need money for a down payment on an investment property, the development of a product you plan to sell, or for investment into dividend stocks.

Managing Passive Income Streams

No matter which type of passive income you choose to pursue, it’s important to keep track of your personal finances and both your short-term and long-term financial goals.

Tracking multiple sources of income in a monthly budget can be a complex task. To be profitable, it’s important to pay attention to how much money you put into the maintenance of your passive income stream(s), such as property upkeep or monthly online services.

SoFi is one option to simplify how you manage your income streams because it allows you to see all of your financial information in one place. In the app, you can keep track of your monthly income and create goals for your passive income, such as a home, vacation, or retirement, and automate your personal finances.

The Takeaway

Establishing passive income streams is one way to diversify your income and can help you build wealth and achieve financial freedom in the long term. There are a variety of ways to earn passive income, such as through investing, rental properties, and automated investing.

Some passive income sources require a financial commitment or upfront investment, such as purchasing a rental property, and others may require a time commitment. And passive income, of course, is rarely 100% passive. Often there is considerable time and effort that goes into setting up a passive income stream. And some sources of passive income (from investing, real estate, running a business or creative endeavor) require ongoing maintenance.

Once you’re earning passive income, you can think about where to put that money. Whether you’re able to generate a passive income stream from your investments, or that’s a goal of yours, consider opening an Active Invest account with SoFi Invest. You can invest in stocks, exchange-traded funds, and SoFi also offers an automated portfolio.

For a limited time, opening and funding an Active Invest account gives you the opportunity to get up to $1,000 in the stock of your choice.


SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Investment Risk: Diversification can help reduce some investment risk. It cannot guarantee profit, or fully protect in a down market.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Claw Promotion: Customer must fund their Active Invest account with at least $10 within 30 days of opening the account. Probability of customer receiving $1,000 is 0.028%. See full terms and conditions.

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What Happens to a Direct Deposit if It Goes to a Closed Account?

Accidents happen; they’re simply a part of life. And one of the hiccups that can occur is a direct deposit going to a bank account that is closed. Maybe the account holder shut it or the financial institution did, but either way, the money may seem to be lost in the ether. Not a good feeling!

If you’re in this situation or worried about it occurring, relax. The money isn’t going to vanish into a black hole. The issue can usually be resolved, and there are several ways to track and reclaim the funds.

Key Points

•   Direct deposits to closed accounts are usually returned to the sender.

•   The bank may hold onto the funds and give the account holder time to reopen the closed account.

•   Banks may issue a paper check to the individual who owns the closed account.

•   To avoid a misdirected deposit, it’s important to double-check account numbers and cancel direct deposits before closing a bank account.

What Is a Closed Account?

A closed account refers to a deactivated or terminated account; in other words, it’s no longer open and available for deposits and withdrawals. The account holder, a custodian or the account, or the banking institution can usually close an account.

Why might a bank close an account? This can be what happens when your bank account is negative and you fail to replenish it and/or pay overdraft fees. Or perhaps the bank has seen activity they don’t think is legitimate, among other reasons.

Once this happens, it’s generally not possible to deposit funds by direct deposit or otherwise into the account.
(We’ll walk through exceptions to this rule shortly.) Often the term “closed account” refers to a checking or savings account, but it can also refer to a derivative trading, auto loan, brokerage, or credit card account.

💡 Quick Tip: Consumers spend more than they realize on bank fees every year. With an online checking account with no fees from SoFi you won’t pay an account fee, and you even get overdraft coverage for up to $50 with qualifying direct deposits.

What Can Happen to a Direct Deposit if It Is Sent to a Closed Account?

Sometimes, you may have gone to the trouble of setting up direct deposit in the past, but then the account later winds up closed. You might wonder what happens if a direct deposit is sent to a closed account.

Most banks have a standard process they follow when misdirected money is received. Let’s look at a few different situations that can play out.

Direct Deposit Will Be Returned to the Sender

In many cases when someone tries to send money to a closed account, the bank will simply return the funds to the sender or decline the transaction. It can take about five to 10 days for funds to be returned to the sender. This timeline can speed up if the account holder to whom the deposit was intended is in good standing with the bank.

Bank Can Possibly Hold Funds

If a deposit is issued to a closed account, the bank may choose to hold onto the funds and may give the account holder time to reopen a closed bank account. Reopening a closed account, however, is only possible in a couple of scenarios. It’s not a sure thing.

Sometimes, a situation arises with what is known as a dormant account. This means there hasn’t been any activity over a period of time except for interest accruing. You may be able to get the account fully up and running again by contacting your financial institution.

In other cases, you might be able to reopen an account that is frozen. In the case of a frozen account, you may not be able to withdraw funds due to the financial institution’s decision (perhaps there is activity that doesn’t seem legitimate) or a court order (that is, a judgment against you). In some of these scenarios, you may be able to fix a frozen account by talking with your bank, or you may need legal assistance.

Banks may be more willing to work with customers if this is the first time a situation like this (meaning a dormant or frozen account) has happened. If a deposit was intended for you and you are able to reopen your account, this issue can resolve quickly—possibly within 24 hours.

Bank May Issue a Paper Check

Some banks choose to issue a paper check to the individual who owns the closed account. Other times, the company or individual with whom you set up direct deposit may get their funds back from the bank and then may make the payment via a paper check.

Get up to $300 when you bank with SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings Account with direct deposit and get up to a $300 cash bonus. Plus, get up to 4.60% APY on your cash!


When Does a Bank Return a Direct Deposit to the Sender?

If a bank receives a direct deposit for a closed account or for a faulty account number, they may choose to return the direct deposit to the sender or to simply decline the transaction.

Can a Direct Deposit Reopen a Closed Account?

Occasionally, a direct deposit being sent to a closed account can trigger its reopening. A bank may choose to give a customer the chance to reopen their account. They might hold onto the funds until the account is reopened so they can complete the direct deposit.

This happens very much on a case-by-case, bank-by-bank decision. Communication with your financial institution can be very important in this situation. Next, you’ll learn more about how this works.

Recommended: How Long Does a Direct Deposit Take to Go Through?

What Can I Do if My Direct Deposit Was Sent to a Closed Account?

If a direct deposit was sent into a closed account, the best thing to do is to contact the bank the funds were sent to. This can help you resolve the issue as quickly as possible. Every bank has its own processes for handling situations like this. Yours can help you understand what the best next steps may be.

The bank may or may not play a role in getting the funds to you. In some cases, you may need to deal directly with the payor. But in either case, your financial institution should be able to give you guidance.

Also, remember that while it can be stressful when a direct deposit goes to a closed account, the money won’t be lost. You should be able to get your funds back.

Avoiding a Misdirected Direct Deposit

To avoid having a direct deposit sent to a closed account, it’s best to get ahead of the issue. These are some steps you can take to help avoid a misdirected direct deposit.

•   Double-check account numbers on direct deposit forms. Whenever filling out a new direct deposit form, it’s a good idea to double (if not triple) check the account numbers on the form. Likewise, if you are expecting a recurring direct deposit to a closed bank account, it’s important to get it redirected to a current open account and carefully check that the digits are correct.

•   Cancel direct deposits before canceling a bank account. To help avoid any issues with direct deposits, it’s a good idea to cancel or alter any direct deposits before closing a bank account. Then, you can make sure payments are heading to a bank account that can receive the funds. That way, any issues can be resolved before the account closes so the money doesn’t get stuck in limbo.

Recommended: Are You Bad with Money? Here’s How to Get Better

Banking With SoFi

Not happy with your current bank? Why not open a bank account online with SoFi Checking and Savings? We’ll help you bank better. When you open an account with direct deposit, you’ll earn a competitive APY and you won’t pay any account fees. What’s more, qualifying accounts can have direct deposit paid up to two days earlier — among many more perks!

Better banking is here with up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

Can a direct deposit go into a closed account?

What happens if a direct deposit goes to a closed account? There are several outcomes that vary bank to bank. In some cases, the financial institution may hold onto the funds and let the customer reopen their account to claim the money; it might send the funds back to the payer or decline the transaction; or it may choose to issue a paper check to the payee.

How long does it take for a payment to bounce back from a closed account?

If an individual or business issues a direct deposit to a closed account, the bank may choose to either decline the transaction or send the funds back to the payer. If they choose to send the funds back to the payer, it typically takes anywhere from five to 10 days for them to get their money back.

What happens to money refunded to a closed bank account?

A few different scenarios can happen if money is refunded to a closed bank account. The bank to simply decline the transaction or to send the funds back to the payer. Other options include issuing a paper check to the payee or possibly holding onto the funds and giving the payee the option to reopen their closed account.


Photo credit: iStock/MissTuni

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a deposit to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


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Is $100,000 a Year Salary Good?

Is a $100,000 Salary Good?

In most parts of the country, a $100,000 salary is considered good; maybe even very, very good. It can be more than enough for an individual or even a small family to live comfortably. With $100,000 a year, a person could cover typical expenses, pay down debt, build their savings, contribute toward retirement, invest, and still have enough money for entertainment, hobbies, and vacations.

But there can certainly be exceptions to whether $100K a year is good, as well as ways to make that salary go even farther than it might otherwise.

Key Points

•   A $100,000 salary is considered good in most parts of the country, and can cover typical expenses, pay down debt, build savings, and allow for entertainment and hobbies.

•   According to the U.S. Census, only 15.3% of American households make more than $100,000 annually.

•   A $100,000 salary can yield a monthly income of $8,333.33, a biweekly paycheck of $3,846.15, a weekly income of $1,923.08, and a daily income of $384.62 based on 260 working days per year.

•   The five cheapest cities to live in 2022 are Hickory, North Carolina; Green Bay, Wisconsin; Huntsville, Alabama; Quad Cities (Davenport-Bettendorf, Iowa and Moline-Rock Island, Illinois); and Fort Wayne, Indiana.

•   Tips for living off a $100,000 budget include getting on a budget, saving your money, getting out of debt, and creating a retirement plan.

Factors to Determine if a $100,000 Salary Is Good

Is $100K a good salary? In almost every case, yes. It’s well above the poverty line as well as the American median income for both individuals and smaller families. Even in the face of rising inflation, a $100,000 annual income can typically afford a comfortable lifestyle and financial stability.

Here are some factors to determine if $100,000 is a good salary:

•   Location: While $100K can cover expenses in most places across the U.S., it won’t stretch as far in places with a higher cost of living. In some of the most expensive cities in the U.S., a $100K salary might mean spending a significantly higher percentage of your income on housing. For instance, in the summer of 2022, the average rent in Manhattan hit $5,000 a month.

•   Taxes: As an individual, $100K a year puts you in the 24% federal income tax bracket. That means that you’d only bring home $76,000 after federal taxes — even less depending on state, city, and school district taxes. Married individuals bringing in $100,000 total are taxed slightly lower (22%), meaning $78,000 after Uncle Sam’s cut at the federal level.

•   Family size: A $100K a year salary can yield comfortable living for most individuals, but the larger a family becomes, the harder it is to make that money stretch. Additional children or other dependents may result in higher grocery bills, utility usage, school costs, and doctor visits.

How Does a $100,000 Salary Compare to the American Median Income?

The American median household income is roughly $67,500, per the latest published U.S. Census results. More recently, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the median weekly income for a full-time worker is $1,037, which translates to a $54,000 median annual salary.

Either way, a $100,000 salary is almost double the American median income. If you live in what’s known as a DINK household (dual income, no kids) and your domestic partner also brings home a sizable paycheck, you are sitting even higher above that median household income.

Recommended: Typical Bills for One Person Per Month

What Percentage of Americans Make Over $100,000 Annually?

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, only 15.3% of American households pull in more than $100,000 annually. However, a “household” might consist of two or more salaries totaling $100,000.

$100,000 Salary Breakdown

So is making $100K a year good? It’s almost surely easier than living on $20K a year. Let’s look at how it breaks down into monthly, weekly, and even daily pay:

•   Monthly income: $8,333.33

•   Biweekly paycheck: $3,846.15

•   Weekly income: $1,923.08

•   Daily income: $384.62 based on 260 working days per year.

Keep in mind that this salary breakdown uses pre-tax income. Actual paychecks will likely be lower after taxes and any health insurance premiums and retirement contributions are deducted.

Can You Live Individually on a $100,000 Income?

It is indeed possible to live individually on a $100,000 income. At that salary, many individuals will be able to cover not only basic living expenses but also discretionary expenses, like dining out and traveling.

Individuals making $100K annually often have enough disposable income to pay down debt, contribute to retirement, work toward multiple savings goals (like home ownership and vacations), and even invest.

Get up to $300 when you bank with SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings Account with direct deposit and get up to a $300 cash bonus. Plus, get up to 4.60% APY on your cash!


How Much Rent Can You Afford Living on a $100,000 Income?

The conventional advice on how much of your income to spend on housing is no more than 30%. While economists may need to reevaluate that number given current inflation and soaring housing prices, that would mean an individual could afford $30,000 in rent costs each year, or roughly $2,500 a month, on $100K a year.

However, at $100,000 a year, an individual could consider buying a home instead. A $100K salary might make it easier to save for a down payment and keep up with maintenance expenses, property taxes, and homeowners insurance.

Best Places to Live on a $100,000 Salary

At $100,000 a year, an individual or small family can likely live in most locations. In fact, $100,000 is higher than the annual median income ($65,290) of America’s most expensive city, Los Angeles.

That said, if you want to make your dollars stretch as far as possible, consider what U.S. News has deemed the five cheapest cities to live in 2022:

•   Hickory, North Carolina

•   Green Bay, Wisconsin

•   Huntsville, Alabama

•   Quad Cities (Davenport-Bettendorf, Iowa and Moline-Rock Island, Illinois)

•   Fort Wayne, Indiana

Recommended: Cost of Living by State

Worst Places to Live on a $100,000 Salary

A $100,000 salary can typically afford at least basic living expenses even in America’s most expensive cities. However, living in such places can make it harder to build your savings and invest toward your future.

If you want to live comfortably on $100,000 a year, it may be wise to avoid what have been deemed America’s most expensive cities in 2022:

•   Los Angeles, California

•   Miami, Florida

•   San Diego, California

•   Salinas, California

•   Santa Barbara, California

Is a $100,000 Salary Considered Rich?

Many people may consider a $100,000 salary to be rich. However, “rich” is a relative term with a vague definition, meaning an abundance of wealth and assets. Much of it depends on where you live and how you use the income (spending vs. saving vs. investing).

Also, consider how personal circumstances can differ. If you earn $100K a year and your spouse doesn’t work outside the home and you are supporting three children as well as a relative with medical needs, that high salary may not stretch as far. Add some student loans, a jumbo mortgage, and car payments to the picture, and you realize a person earning $100,000 a year might not qualify as rich in most people’s estimation. They may be barely making ends meet.

Tips for Living off a $100,000 Budget

How can you make the most of a $100,000 salary? Here are a few tips for living off a $100,000 budget:

Getting on a Budget

No matter your salary, it’s a good idea to design a monthly budget. At a minimum, keep track of your monthly expenses vs. your monthly income. After you have accounted for all your mandatory expenses, like your mortgage and your groceries, you can calculate what you have left for discretionary expenses (the “wants” in life), savings, debt repayment, and investments.

Saving Your Money

It’s a good idea to have emergency savings at the very least; being able to cover three to six months’ of expenses without any income flowing in is ideal.

Beyond an emergency savings, you may want to allocate money in your budget each month to other savings goals, including a house or car down payment, wedding, vacation, or home renovations. Having a high-interest savings account with automatic savings features can help you get to your goal faster.

Recommended: How to Save Money From Your Salary

Getting Out of Debt

Paying down debt can be a good use of funds when you have room in your budget, especially if you have particularly high-interest credit card debt. You can weigh options like the debt avalanche vs. debt snowball method when you have multiple sources of debt or even consider a credit card debt consolidation loan.

Creating a Retirement Plan

If you’re wondering “When should I start saving for retirement?” many financial experts would likely say the answer is “yesterday.” The sooner you start saving, the sooner your money can grow via compound interest.

If your employer offers a 401(k) match and you can afford to funnel a percentage of your paycheck into a retirement account, it’s often a wise idea to opt in. But employer-sponsored 401(k) accounts aren’t your only retirement option. Depending on your situation, it may be a good idea to take advantage of a rollover or traditional IRA and other retirement strategies.

Investing Your Money

Investing isn’t only for retirement. If you are earning $100K a year and have extra money after having built up emergency savings and wiped out your debt, you might benefit from investing in the stock market or even real estate.

Learning how to invest can be intimidating; if you’re not sure where to start, it can be a good idea to work with a trusted investment broker.

The Takeaway

For most individuals and small families, the answer to “Is $100,000 a good salary?” is a resounding “yes.” Cost of living and family size can affect how far $100,000 will go, but generally speaking, you can live comfortably on $100,000 a year.

Are you hoping to make the most of your salary? Consider a bank account from SoFi Banking. When opened with direct deposit, you’ll earn a competitive APY and pay no monthly account fees, which can help your money grow faster. Plus, eligible SoFi accounts provide paycheck access up to two days early. You enjoy other rewards, like cash back on local purchases and no-fee overdraft coverage.

Better banking is here with up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

What jobs pay over $100,000?

Many jobs pay over $100,000 a year in various fields. These jobs include doctors, lawyers, software engineers, business leaders, pharmacists, psychologists, IT managers, finance managers, and many others. Those in creative fields, from writers to hair stylists, can earn that salary, too.

Is making $100,000 a year common?

Making $100,000 a year is not common in the U.S. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, only 15.3% of American households make more than $100,000.

Can you live comfortably on $100K a year?

Most people can live comfortably on $100K a year. If you live in an area with a high cost of living and/or have a large family or very high expenses and/or debt, it may be more difficult to live comfortably on $100K a year. In either case, it is usually not challenging to afford basic living expenses.

What is considered wealthy in the U.S.?

Americans said in one survey that they believe it takes a net worth of $2.2 million to be considered “wealthy.” When calculating net worth, you’ll factor in more than just income; it also includes assets (like a house and retirement account), less any debts and liabilities.


Photo credit: iStock/Inside Creative House

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a deposit to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


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How Much Does GPA Matter When Applying to College

How Much Does GPA Matter When Applying to College?

When deciding which applicants to accept, colleges and universities typically look for the best of the best. But, that doesn’t always mean the “best” is the person with the highest grades in high school.

Yes, a student’s grade point average, or GPA, is a good metric for measuring just what and how successfully they completed their high school course, but how much does a student’s GPA really matter for college admission? It depends.

Keep reading to find out when it matters, when it doesn’t, and all the other factors college admissions take into account beyond a student’s GPA.

Weighted vs Unweighted GPA

Traditionally, high schools measure a student’s academic performance on an unweighted GPA scale, meaning the number only goes up to a 4.0 for an A in a class. This measurement method does not take into account the difficulty level of classes, so an honors English class will be measured in the same way as a non-honors class.

On the other hand, weighted GPAs do take into account the difficulty level of a student’s coursework. Most weighted GPA scales measure from a 0 to a 5.0. This means, an AP-level or honors level class could earn a student a 5.0, while a lower-level class will only reward A work with a 4.0.

A weighted scale can offer students a little more flexibility when it comes to their overall GPA. Say a student is taking four classes, one is an honors level course and the three others are typical classes. The student receives an A in the honors class, which accounts for a 5.0; an A in two other courses, denoting a 4.0 and a 4.0, and a B in the last, at a 3.0. Despite receiving a B in a course, that would still end up with a weighted 4.0 GPA.


💡 Quick Tip: You can fund your education with a low-rate, no-fee private student loan that covers all school-certified costs.

Do Colleges Look at Weighted vs. Unweighted?

For the sake of looking at all applicants equally, colleges generally look at unweighted GPAs. They will typically separately consider how rigorous the coursework was. So, for example, if you took all AP classes and have an unweighted 4.0 GPA, you would be seen as a stronger applicant than someone who took less challenging courses and also got an unweighted 4.0, even though your GPAs are the same.

Colleges also look at unweighted GPAs (as well as standardized test scores and other factors) for merit-based scholarships. The more successful students are more likely to receive tuition funding.

College admissions staff may also look into other things when it comes to a student’s GPA, including grade trends. If a student didn’t start out high school on the best note, but performed well during their junior and senior year with a strong GPA, admissions may see that as excellent growth and perseverance in a student’s academic career.

Recommended: How Do Grades Affect Your Student Loans?

A “Good” GPA

Again, it’s important to remember that your GPA isn’t everything and that college admissions staff will likely look at much more than just your grades. However, it’s also always nice to know where you stand amongst the pack.

The average high school GPA is around 3.0 (or a B), including students who do and don’t apply to college. However, the average GPA for students applying to college is closer to 3.5 to 4.0, and the average for students applying to Ivy League schools can be even higher – 4.00 or close to it.

The average weighted GPA is 4.15 at Harvard and MIT.

While GPA isn’t everything, it’s a good idea to keep it in mind when deciding which schools, or how many, to apply to.

Recommended: How to Get Into College With a GED

What Else Do Colleges Look At?

Yes, colleges will take into account a student’s GPA. However, colleges and universities also take into account a complete picture of who a student is. That means they look into trends in a student’s grades throughout their education and likely look at a student’s test scores on the SAT or ACT.

College admissions officers also look at a student’s involvement in extracurriculars, sports teams, their involvement in their community through organizations and volunteer work, and any relevant work experience.

Admissions staff will also likely weigh a student’s application using their recommendation letters, which speak to a student’s merit far beyond their grades. Admissions will also read a student’s complete application and read any required essays.

Again, a lot goes into the admissions process, and grades aren’t the end all be all. This all means when you are preparing for college, even in your early high school years, you may want to prepare by diversifying your interests and pursuits to ensure they can tell a larger story in their application.

Colleges That Don’t Take GPA Into Account

There are schools out there with low or no minimum GPA requirements for applicants. These include many for-profit schools, as well as community colleges. In fact, if your GPA is on the lower end, you might consider attending a community college for a year or two and then transferring to a four-year university or college.

For example, California Community Colleges do not have a minimum GPA or testing requirements for incoming students. Attending a community college could be a great way for students to learn and grow personally and academically, and to increase their academic performance before transferring.

No Matter a Student’s GPA, It’s Good to Have a Plan

Being financially prepared for college can help take some of the stress away from worrying about how your GPA will affect your chances of admission.

While filling out applications, you may want to also look into all your financial options as well. This begins with filling out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to see if you are eligible for federal student aid, which include grants, scholarships, work-study, and federal loans.

If you still have gaps to fill, you may also want to consider a private student loan via a bank, credit union, or private lender. Unlike federal student loans, this involves a credit check. Students who have strong finances (or have a cosigner who does) stand to get lower interest rates and more favorable loan terms. Keep in mind that private student loans don’t come with government protections such as forbearance and forgiveness programs.


💡 Quick Tip: It’s a good idea to understand the pros and cons of private student loans and federal student loans before committing to them.

The Takeaway

GPA is one factor in the college admissions process. How heavily GPA is weighted as a factor in admissions decisions will vary from school to school. Many schools will list the average GPA of admitted students, which can help give you an idea of how your GPA stacks up to students at that school. Other factors for admission might include a student’s transcript, letters of recommendation, and personal essay.

If you’ve exhausted all federal student aid options, no-fee private student loans from SoFi can help you pay for school. The online application process is easy, and you can see rates and terms in just minutes. Repayment plans are flexible, so you can find an option that works for your financial plan and budget.


Cover up to 100% of school-certified costs including tuition, books, supplies, room and board, and transportation with a private student loan from SoFi.



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SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


SoFi Private Student Loans
Please borrow responsibly. SoFi Private Student Loans are not a substitute for federal loans, grants, and work-study programs. You should exhaust all your federal student aid options before you consider any private loans, including ours. Read our FAQs. SoFi Private Student Loans are subject to program terms and restrictions, and applicants must meet SoFi’s eligibility and underwriting requirements. See SoFi.com/eligibility-criteria for more information. To view payment examples, click here. SoFi reserves the right to modify eligibility criteria at any time. This information is subject to change.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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