woman holding dog in office

Budgeting For a New Dog

The United States is more than a little dog crazy: The percentage of households with a canine stands at 44.6%, meaning almost one out of two have a pooch. Owning a dog can be one of life’s great pleasures, whether you choose a tiny Chihuahua puppy or a mega, full-grown Great Dane as your new best friend.

But amid imagining all the cuddles and sloppy kisses, many prospective dog parents aren’t fully prepared for the expense of owning a pet.

This can indeed be an important question because not only can dog ownership be a major personal commitment, it can also be a considerable financial investment,g too. The initial first-year investment has been estimated at between $1,135 and $5,155.

If you’re considering bringing home a new pooch, here’s the information you need to know about budgeting for a dog and how much it’s likely to really cost.

8 Costs of Owning a Dog

It’s easy to fall in love with an adorable dog and feel as if you just must make it yours ASAP. But it’s wise to do a little research first about potential bills before bringing home your pooch.

Doing so can not only prepare you for the costs of pet ownership but potentially save you money on your pet as well. Knowing the expenses involved can help you budget, prioritize, and comparison-shop as you move ahead with getting your new best friend. Read on for eight costs that are likely to crop up.

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1. Adoption Costs

The initial cost of adopting a dog can vary greatly depending on if the dog comes from a shelter or purchased from a breeder. As a range, however, Animal Humane Society sets its standard dog and puppy adoption fees between $255 to $414.

The fee cost varies, as some dogs (such as purebreds) are in higher demand and the organization needs to cover the cost of caring for animals who may take longer to adopt out (such as older dogs).

At many pet rescues, adoption fees also cover the cost of extra services, like a pet physical exam, deworming, spaying or neutering, or common vaccinations.

Adoption vs Buying

If you’re wondering how adoption costs compare to buying a dog, consider that purchasing a Goldendoodle from a breeder costs an average of $2,200. What’s more, buying a pet from private breeders often does not come with the extra services that some non-profit rescues cover. So, if an owner is considering the breeder route, the out-of-pocket cost of future medical visits may be one more dollar sign to add to the eventual pet budget. This can help you know how much to allocate towards your new companion so you can avoid ending up with credit card debt.

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2. Food and Treats

Some of the tiniest puppies can morph, in just a few months or years, into heftier eating machines. Young puppies can grow quickly. And, all that fast growth can mean they’ll eat…A lot.

So, food and treats can also play a significant role in your personal budget when you bring home a furbaby. Individual dog budgets can vary based on the size of the pooch and type of food each owner opts to feed their pet. Food choices might include dry kibble, wet food, a raw food diet, or some mix of each.

What to feed a dog is all a personal choice between the owner and their veterinarian. However, if someone is looking to estimate the potential cost of feeding a new dog, estimates range from $250 to $700 for food and treats. This will vary with what kind of food you buy (organic? bulk?), where you live, and how much your pet eats.

Recommended: Ways to Save Money on Food

3. Toys

Toys may seem like a silly little add-on, but they can play an important role in puppy development and adult dogs’ mental stimulation.

Toys can help dogs fight boredom when they are left at home alone and comfort them if they’re agitated. (With toys to gnaw on, dogs may be less likely to turn to shoes for a midday distraction.) Rather than investing in pricey toys, a simple tennis ball will satisfy many dogs. And, a dog owner can grab a can of three, fun-to-chase tennis balls on Amazon for about $4.

However, the cost here can also depend on just how quickly an individual dog chews through the balls. Some doggos do a great job of tearing them apart. So, a pet owner may want to budget a small amount, say $50 or $75 a year or so, to buy their pooch some toys.

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4. Pet Sitters or Walkers

Taking a vacation with a pet? Then pet sitting isn’t an expense. But for many people who work outside the home or travel without Fido, it may be a good idea to consider a dog walker or pet sitter. This person can be a trusted friend or family member, a neighbor, a kid down the street, or a professional service.

Even if it’s a friend, a new pet owner may want to budget in some dollars to pay this person. Doggie daycare can run $40 or more per day (higher in certain areas, such as major cities), so it can be helpful for owners to know how many days each month they might need a dog sitter.

Also, if you are taking a vacation and aren’t traveling with your pet, know that a typical pet sitter will charge at least $30 a day to attend to your pup.

5. Incidentals

A lot of smaller expenses can come with owning a dog. Incidentals to budget for include things like, collars, leashes, dog beds, cleaning supplies, crates, pet bath products, and the all-important groomer. Many pet owners like buying their dogs clothes, which can add up as well. It can be wise to build in another cushion in a pet budget to cover the above-mentioned items, too.

Pet I.D. tags and registering a pet with the city are extra costs to bear in mind. (For reference, it can cost between $8.50 and $34 a year to obtain a dog license in New York City.)

💡 Quick Tip: An emergency fund or rainy day fund is an important financial safety net. Aim to have at least three to six months’ worth of basic living expenses saved in case you get a major unexpected bill or lose income.

6. Medical Visits

Dogs, like humans, need regular medical check-ups, so “How much will it cost?” is a wise question to ask when budgeting. Just like a human exam, dogs need blood drawn to check for diseases, routine vaccinations to prevent disease, and a general physical exam once a year to make sure their health is in working order.

The cost of health care for a dog can vary greatly depending on where the person and the pup live (and the age or breed of the dog). Recent estimates say routine visits can cost anywhere from $50 to $250, and overall vet costs can run from $700 to $1,500 or more per year.

Beyond vet visits, pet parents may also want to add in a budget for preventative medicine. Depending on where an owner lives, a veterinarian could recommend a monthly flea and tick medication, along with regular heartworm medication, to prevent the dog from becoming afflicted. Flea and tick meds can range from $40 to $200 a year while heartworm medication averages $5 to $15 a month, and treatment, if your pet is diagnosed, can cost $400 to $1,000.

7. Pet Insurance

While pet insurance won’t cover routine veterinary visits, it could come in handy if an emergency occurs with the pup.

For example, a new dog could eat something that causes it to get sick — like, ingesting pieces of a chew-toy or snatching food with bones in it off an owner’s plate (or street).

Many pet insurance plans will cover a portion of medicines, treatments (including surgeries), and medical interventions that aren’t tied to a pre-existing condition.

Paying monthly for pet insurance, while the dog is young, could save an owner hundreds or thousands of dollars as a dog continues to age as well. (Generally, pet insurance costs less when a dog is younger). This kind of policy typically costs between $38 and $56 per month.

Pet insurance may cover things like ingesting harmful items or food, accidents, urgent care, and — in some cases — preventative medicine. The cost of pet insurance can vary significantly by your pet’s breed, age, and any other health history.

8. Emergency Fund

It can be wise to save up an emergency fund for pet-related expenses. Things just tend to happen with dogs around. They can accidentally knock things over with their tails, swallow objects. and need an emergency vet visit. Dogs can do a lot of damage in a short amount of time (ahem, chewed up leather shoes).

But, guess what? Having some financial discipline can be worth it for a lick on the face, a little playtime, and coming home to a happy dog. Planning ahead for a pet budget can help new owners focus on those tail-wagging moments with Fido instead of stressing over canine costs.

The Takeaway

More than 44% of US households have dogs as pets, which shows how beloved they are. But before you get a pet, it’s important to know the costs involved (which can add up to thousands per year) and budget wisely. Saving in advance can make adopting and then caring for a dog easier. You might look for a high-yield checking and savings account to help your money grow for this purpose.

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FAQ

How much does it cost to buy a new dog?

Costs can vary tremendously. Adoption fees are often estimated at between $255 to $414, and buying a dog from a breeder can run into the thousands.

What is the monthly cost of owning a dog?

The costs of owning a dog can vary greatly, from $40 to $290 a month, depending on factors such as the dog’s breed, age, health, and your location.

Can pet insurance save me money?

Pet insurance can save you money, but it really depends on your particular pet, the policy, and your specific situation. If the premiums and out-of-pocket insurance costs exceed what you expect to spend on your pet’s care, it may not be a wise buy.


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SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

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Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Skilled Trade Jobs in Demand for 2024

You don’t necessarily need a four-year degree to have a rewarding career that pays well. In fact, there are plenty of jobs out there that don’t require a bachelor’s degree and meet a wide variety of talents and interests, from nursing to mechanical technicians.

Here’s an explainer of what exactly is a “trade job,” plus a list of 25 of the highest-paying trade jobs as of 2022, which is the latest data available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What Is a Trade Job?

A trade job is a career that requires advanced training and skill that can be acquired outside a four-year bachelor’s degree. Instead, experience can be acquired through on-the-job instruction, apprenticeship, or vocational schooling.


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Highest-Paying Trade Jobs

If you’re interested in a job that doesn’t require a college degree, or you love working with your hands, consider this list of some of the highest-paying trade jobs in the U.S. The compilation shows average annual salary and was compiled from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

By the way, most if not all trade jobs require workers to be on site. Working remotely is not an option.

1. Power Plant Operator, Distributor, and Dispatcher – $97,570

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent, long-term on-the-job training

Duties: Control power plants and the flow of electricity from plants to substations, which then deliver power to homes and businesses.

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2. Real Estate Broker – $52,030

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent. Must complete some real estate courses to be eligible for licensure.

Duties: Help people buy and sell properties.

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3. Registered Nurse – $81,220

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree in Nursing, Associate degree in Nursing, or a diploma from an approved nursing program. Registered nurses must be licensed.

Duties: Help provide and coordinate patient care.

4. Dental Hygienist – $81,400

Requirements: Associate degree

Duties: Provide preventive dental care and examine patients for signs of oral diseases.

5. Water Transportation Worker – $66,100

Requirements: Will vary by job. For example, there are no requirements for entry-level sailors, while other workers might need to complete Coast Guard–approved training.

Duties: Operate and maintain vessels that carry cargo and people on the water.

6. Diagnostic Medical Sonographer – $78,210

Requirements: Associate degree

Duties: Operate special imaging equipment to create images of patients’ internal organs or to conduct tests.

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7. Farmer, Rancher, or Other Agricultural Manager – $75,760

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Run farms and other establishments that produce livestock, dairy products, or crops.

8. Gas Plant Operator – $79,460

Requirements: High school diploma

Duties: Help distribute or process gas for utility companies by controlling the compressors on main gas pipelines.

9. Pile Driver Operator – $70,220

Requirements: High school diploma and vocational training can be helpful.

Duties: Operate machines that drive pilings for retaining walls, bulkheads, and foundations of buildings, bridges, and piers.

10. First-Line Supervisor of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers – $77,650

Requirements: High school diploma and five years or more work experience

Duties: Directly supervise and coordinate the activities of construction or extraction workers, such as miners or those drilling for minerals.

11. First-Line Supervisor of Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers – $76,020

Requirements: High school diploma, some work experience

Duties: Directly supervise and coordinate mechanics, installers, and repairers. They may also advise customers seeking recommendations for services.

12. Legal Support Worker – $59,200

Requirements: Associate degree

Duties: Perform a variety of tasks to support attorneys such as interviewing clients, legal research, and case summaries.

13. Locomotive Engineer – $73,850

Requirements: High school diploma

Duties: Operate passenger and freight trains safely. May also coordinate train activities or control rail yard signals and switches.

14. Subway and Streetcar Operator – $75,880

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Operate subways or elevated suburban trains that don’t have a separate locomotive, or may operate an electric-powered streetcar. May handle fares.

15. Line Installer and Repairer – $82,340

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Install and repair lines for electrical power systems, telecommunications, and fiber optics.

16. Computer Network Support Specialist – $59,660

Requirements: Entry-level requirements may vary, but network support specialists usually need to have an associate degree. Applicants to these jobs may qualify with high school diploma and information technology certifications.

Duties: Provide technical support to computer users while also maintaining computer networks.

17. Claims Adjuster, Examiner, and Investigator – $72,040

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Evaluate insurance claims and act as an intermediary between claimants and the insurance company.

18. Electrical and Electronics Installer and Repairer for Transportation Equipment – $71,740

Requirements: Specialized training at a technical college

Duties: Install and maintain mobile electronics communication equipment on trains, watercraft, or other mobile equipment.

Recommended: The Highest Paying Jobs in Every State

19. Avionics Technician – $70,740

Requirements: Some may obtain a degree or certificate from a Federal Aviation Administration–approved aviation maintenance technician school, while other candidates may be trained on the job or in the military.

Duties: Repair and perform scheduled maintenance on aircraft.

20. Fire Inspector and Investigator – $65,800

Requirements: High school diploma, on-the-job training, and typically some experience as a firefighter

Duties: Fire inspectors help ensure buildings meet federal, state, and local fire codes and inspect buildings for potential fire hazards.

21. Transit and Railroad Police – $76,380

Requirements: Typically you must have a high school diploma or equivalent, complete a transit and railroad police training program, and receive a passing grade on a law enforcement exam from your state.

Duties: Help protect employees, passengers, and railroad and transit property.

22. Insurance Sales Agent – $57,860

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Work with clients and customers to explain and sell various types of insurance.

23. Media and Communication Equipment Worker – $74,490

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Install, repair, and maintain audio and visual systems across various industries, such as corporate offices and the film industry.

24. Boilermaker – $66,920

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Install, maintain, and repair boilers.

25. Construction and Building Inspector – $64,480

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Inspects buildings to ensure they are structurally sound and in compliance with specifications, building codes, and other regulations. May focus on a specific area such as plumbing or electrical systems.


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The Takeaway

On the high end, trade workers can make $90,000 or more at a career that doesn’t require a college education. That’s well above the $59,540 that represents the annual median income of U.S. full-time workers. And with a diverse range of career options to choose from, individuals who choose a trade job have a good chance at finding a fulfilling career that matches their interests and personality.

As your career takes off and you start earning a salary, you’ll likely want to begin budget planning and setting financial goals like paying down debt and saving for your future.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.


See exactly how your money comes and goes at a glance.


Photo credit: iStock/kali9

SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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30 Best High Paying Good Jobs For Extroverts That Pay Well in 2023

25 Best Jobs for Extroverts That Pay Well in 2024

The right career is one that capitalizes on an individual’s unique combination of skills, interests, and personality. Extroverts, for instance, tend to flourish in certain jobs and industries that introverts may not care for. And the worst jobs for extroverts are likely ones that attract introverts.

For all you extroverts out there, we’ve rounded up dozens of well-paying jobs that would be lucky to have you on board.

Key Points

•   Extroverts thrive in careers that leverage their social skills and preference for group settings.

•   Jobs well-suited for extroverts often involve significant interaction and collaboration with others.

•   Career options for extroverts range from insurance sales agents to high school teachers, each requiring different levels of education and training.

•   Many roles ideal for extroverts, such as public relations specialists and human resources managers, offer competitive salaries.

•   Extroverts are likely to excel in positions where communication and interpersonal skills are crucial for success.

How to Know If You Are an Extrovert

Before we look at jobs for extroverts that pay well, it’s important to understand what an extrovert is. An extrovert is someone who draws their energy from the outside world. Extroverts often feel comfortable in group settings and social situations. They tend to make good leaders because they enjoy working with people.

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Common Characteristics of Extrovert Jobs

Good jobs for extroverts are ones that involve working with other people to solve problems. Because extroverts thrive on the energy they get from connecting with others, they tend to do well in jobs that require a lot of collaboration and human interaction.

On the other hand, good jobs for introverts allow them to focus intensely without interruptions from colleagues.

Do Extroverts Make More Money Than Introverts?

Being an extrovert can lead to a high-paying career. But extroverts don’t necessarily make more money than introverts. Education level, age, experience, and career choice can all greatly impact how much someone earns. Even your location factors in, as high-paying jobs vary by state.


💡 Quick Tip: When you have questions about what you can and can’t afford, a spending tracker app can show you the answer. With no guilt trip or hourly fee.

30 Best Jobs for Extroverts That Pay Well

What jobs are good for extroverts? Anyone looking to start a career or switch careers might consider one of these well-paying jobs for extrovert personalities. This list includes both jobs that don’t require college and those that do. Some even offer six-figure salaries.

Recommended: What Trade Makes the Most Money?

1. Insurance Sales Agent

Median Pay: $57,860 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 6%

Job Description: Work in an office or travel to meet clients. The role also has potential as a work-at-home job for retirees.

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties:

•   Build relationships with potential customers

•   Sell insurance policies

•   Answer product questions

2. Musician and Singer

Median Pay: $39.14 per hour

Job Growth Outlook: 1%

Job Description: Perform music in a studio or live setting for an audience. Professionals can make union wages or charge by the song or performance.

Requirements: No formal educational credential

Duties:

•   Play instruments live or in studio

•   Sing songs live

•   Record songs

3. Actor

Median Pay: $17.94 per hour

Job Growth Outlook: 3%

Job Description: Perform in a live setting or for film and television recordings. Professionals make union wages.

Requirements: Professional or on-the-job training

Duties:

•   Perform in live theater

•   Promote products in commercials

•   Act in movies and television shows

4. High School Teacher

Median Pay: $62,360 per year plus excellent benefits

Job Growth Outlook: 1%

Job Description: Teach academic lessons to high school students and prepare them for college or the job market.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Duties:

•   Prepare lesson plans

•   Teach students in a classroom

•   Grade papers

5. Human Resources Manager

Median Pay: $130,000 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 5%

Job Description: Plan and coordinate the administrative functions of a workplace.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Duties: Work in office environments to help recruit and retain talent, and achieve business goals.

•   Recruit and hire employees

•   Make decisions about competitive pay and benefits

•   Mediate workplace conflicts

Recommended: Is $100,000 a Good Salary?

6. Public Relations Specialist

Median Pay: $67,440 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 6%

Job Description: Develop and maintain the public image of the individuals and businesses they represent. Those with high-profile clients tend to earn the most.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Duties:

•   Write press releases

•   Create public image strategies

•   Provide damage control in crisis situations

7. Physician and Surgeon

Median Pay: $229,300 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 3%

Job Description: Diagnose and treat illnesses and injuries.

Requirements: Medical doctor degree

Duties:

•   Diagnose illnesses

•   Prescribe medications

•   Perform surgeries

Recommended: Is $100,000 a Good Salary?

8. Barber and Hairstylist

Median Pay: $33,400 per year plus tips

Job Growth Outlook: 8%

Job Description: Cut, color, and style client hair. Stylists at higher-end salons can make good money in salary and tips.

Requirements: Postsecondary nondegree award

Duties:

•   Cut and color hair

•   Style hair for special events

•   Provide other appearance services such as shaving

9. Bartender

Median Pay: $29,380 per year plus tips

Job Growth Outlook: 3%

Job Description: Mix and serve cocktails, wine, and beer to customers. Bartenders at higher-end establishments make most of their money in tips.

Requirements: No formal educational credential

Duties:

•   Mix and serve drinks

•   Offer beverage recommendations

•   Track inventory

10. Skincare Specialist

Median Pay: $38,060 per year plus tips

Job Growth Outlook: 9%

Job Description: Provide face and body treatments to clients in a spa or salon setting.

Requirements: State-approved cosmetology or esthetician license

Duties:

•   Assess clients’ skin needs

•   Offer skincare services like facials

•   Consult on skincare regimens

11. Dentist

Median Pay: $159,530 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 4%

Job Description: Diagnose and treat dental problems.

Requirements: Doctoral degree

Duties:

•   Treat patients’ gums, teeth, and mouth

•   Create treatment plans

•   Check for cavities and other dental issues

12. Registered Nurse

Median Pay: $81,220 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 6%

Job Description: Provide patient care.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree and professional licensing

Duties:

•   Provide care in hospitals, physicians’ offices, home healthcare settings, and nursing care facilities

•   Communicate with patients about their needs

•   Educate patients and the public about health conditions

13. Waiter

Median Pay: $29,120 per year plus tips

Job Growth Outlook: -3% (decline)

Job Description: Take customer orders and serve food and drinks. Waiters at higher-end restaurants and catering companies can make a decent salary and excellent tips.

Requirements: Relevant work experience

Duties:

•   Take orders from customers

•   Serve food and drinks

•   Keep a clean and organized work environment

Recommended: What Trade Makes the Most Money?

14. DJ

Median Pay: $20.46 per hour

Job Growth Outlook: -4% (decline)

Job Description: Act as an emcee for events such as weddings and award ceremonies. Popular DJs can earn hefty appearance fees for a few hours of work.

Requirements: Relevant work experience

Duties:

•   Play music

•   Create playlists

•   Host events

15. Political Scientist

Median Pay: $128,020 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 7%

Job Description: Study the origin, development, and operation of political systems and plan political strategies.

Requirements: Master’s degree

Duties:

•   Study political systems

•   Create reports and presentations

•   Consult on strategy

16. Advertising Sales Agent

Median Pay: $58,450 per year

Job Growth Outlook: -7% (decline)

Job Description: Sell advertising space to businesses. Many sales agents work on commission and can bring in high incomes.

Requirements: Relevant work experience

Duties:

•   Sell advertising space for radio, television, newspapers, and other media platforms

•   Meet sales quotas

•   Maintain client relationships

17. Real Estate Broker and Sale Agent

Median Pay: $52,030 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 3%

Job Description: Assist clients in the buying and selling of real estate. Successful agents can make big commissions on home sales.

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties:

•   Help clients find properties

•   Negotiate sales contracts

•   Host open houses

18. Interpreter and Translator

Median Pay: $53,640 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 4%

Job Description: Convert information from one language into another.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Duties:

•   Translate between languages for a variety of organizations

•   Speak simultaneous translations during meetings

•   Translate documents, such as books and business materials

19. Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Manager

Median Pay: $138,730 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 6%

Job Description: Plan advertising and marketing efforts to generate interest in a business’s products and services.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Duties:

•   Develop marketing campaigns

•   Create special promotions

•   Oversee the creation of advertisements

20. Flight Attendant

Median Pay: $63,760 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 11%

Job Description: Assist passengers and respond to safety issues and emergencies.

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent and certification from the Federal Aviation Administration

Duties:

•   Navigate safety issues

•   Serve food and beverages

•   Assist with putting away luggage

21. Lawyer

Median Pay: $135,740 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 8%

Job Description: Advise and represent businesses, government agencies, and individuals on legal matters.

Requirements: Law degree and passing a state bar exam

Duties:

•   Advise clients

•   Represent clients in court

•   Review and draft contracts

22. Physical Therapist Assistant

Median Pay: $57,240 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 19%

Job Description: Help patients regain movement and manage pain after an illness or injury

Requirements: On-the-job training

Duties:

•   Set up equipment

•   Care for patients

•   Work with physical therapists to help patients make progress

23. Marriage and Family Therapist

Median Pay: $56,570 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 15%

Job Description: Work with couples and families to resolve relationship challenges.

Requirements: Master’s degree

Duties:

•   Provide counseling to patients

•   Help mediate conflict

•   Offer mental health support

24. Interior Designer

Median Pay: $61,590 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 4%

Job Description: Work with individuals or businesses to plan, source, and arrange decor.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Duties:

•   Make indoor spaces functional and aesthetically pleasing

•   Consult with clients

•   Choose essential and decorative objects

25. Career Counselor

Median Pay: $60,140 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 5%

Job Description: Help clients choose a career path.

Requirements: Master’s degree and licensure for career counselors and advisors in some states

Duties:

•   Guide clients toward appropriate career paths

•   Interview prep

•   Review resumes and cover letters



💡 Quick Tip: Income, expenses, and life circumstances can change. Consider reviewing your budget a few times a year and making any adjustments if needed.

The Takeaway

There are many jobs for extroverts that pay well, from business roles to creative performers. Many jobs don’t offer traditional salary or hourly wages; instead, a large portion of income is made through commission or tips. Some of the jobs we list require college degrees or professional certifications, but many only require a high school diploma or on-the-job training.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.

With SoFi, you can keep tabs on how your money comes and goes.

FAQ

What jobs are good for an extrovert?

Many jobs that are a good fit for extroverts are those that involve working with clients or patients in a collaborative setting, such as doctor, lawyer, or hairstylist.

What is the most fun, high-paying job?

A lot of fun, rewarding jobs pay well. For example, a bartender at a high-end restaurant can earn hundreds of dollars a night in tips.

What odd job makes the most money?

A job many people may not expect to make a lot of money is political scientist. This career path can lead to a median annual salary of $128,020.


Photo credit: iStock/Harbucks

SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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What Is the Difference Between Will and Estate Planning

The Difference Between Will and Estate Planning

Estate planning and creating a will both involve an uncomfortable topic – thinking about what will happen to your money when you die – but they are separate concepts. Broadly speaking, a will is a specific legal document stipulating exactly how your assets will be distributed on your death and who will care for any dependents. Creating that document is what you may hear referred to as will planning.

Estate planning, on the other hand, is an umbrella term that covers all aspects of end of life documentation and decision making, which can include a will. Estate planning also allows you to say how you want your assets divided after your death and can help you transfer those assets in the most tax-advantageous way possible for your loved ones.

End-of-life documents, including power of attorney and living will forms, are often created as part of the estate planning process. These help ensure that your wishes are followed, even if you are medically incapacitated. (You can also access these as part of will planning; we’ll cover that in a minute.)

Creating a will and estate planning may sound complicated, but in some cases, they can be done relatively quickly, often using online templates. In other cases, it may be advisable to have an attorney manage the process.

What Is Will Planning?

Writing a will usually refers to a very specific task: A will details where you want your assets to go at your death, and who you would like to serve as guardian of your minor children. If you have pets, it may also spell out who will care for them and how. Additionally, a will names an executor. This is the person you are putting in charge of distributing your assets to the right individuals or charities.

In most cases, you’ll be creating what is called a testamentary will, which is signed in the presence of witnesses. This is often considered a good way to protect your decision against challenges from family members and/or business colleagues after you’re gone. While you can write this kind of will yourself, you may want to have it prepared by an attorney who specializes in trusts and estates, to ensure that it complies with your state’s laws. Or look for an online business that customizes its work to your location.

When you are creating a will, you may look into preparing other related documents that are usually part of estate planning. For example, you may be able to add a power of attorney form and a medical directive or living will.

Together, these documents spell out who can handle matters on your behalf if you were to come mentally or physically incapacitated. If you aren’t planning on pursuing estate planning, these are important documents to complete when creating your will. (Even young people have sudden illnesses and accidents, so these forms are an important part of adulthood.)

Many online will templates provide for these additional documents, so that your bases are covered if the worst were to happen. Creating a legal will can cost anywhere from $0 to hundreds or thousands of dollars, depending on whether you do it yourself or if you work with an attorney.

Even if you die with a will in place, it’s likely that the document will go through probate — the legal process in which an executor to the will is formally named and assets are distributed to the beneficiaries you have named in your will. Yes, there are nightmare stories about the probate process, but don’t get too stressed about it. In general, if an executor (an individual appointed to administer the last will and testament of a deceased person) is named in your will and your will is legally valid, the probate process can be relatively streamlined.


💡 Quick Tip: We all know it’s good to have a will in place, but who has the time? These days, you can create a complete and customized estate plan online in as little as 15 minutes.

What Is Estate Planning?

Estate planning can be the umbrella term for all end-of-life decision making, but it’s more often used to describe your plan for how you want your property divided when you die and the financial implications of those decisions. It can involve creating the following:

•   Will/trusts to smooth the transfer of assets/property

•   Durable and healthcare power of attorney

•   Beneficiary designations

•   Guardianship designations

Estate planning aims to make sure that your loved ones receive the maximum proceeds possible from your estate.

Often, estate planning is done with the oversight of an attorney, who can provide strategies for how to minimize tax burdens for your beneficiaries when you die.

Recommended: What Happens If You Die Without a Will?

Who Needs an Estate Plan?

When people talk about estate planning, they may be referring to the decision to create a trust. Trusts can be especially beneficial for high-net worth individuals who may be worried about tax implications of their heirs inheriting their belongings. But they also have a role in less wealthy families. If your clan has a beloved lake house that you want to stay in the family, for future generations, a trust might be a possibility to investigate.

These arrangements allow a third party, or trustee, to hold assets on behalf of a beneficiary or beneficiaries and can help avoid the time-consuming process of probate. Trusts may also be beneficial for people who have dependents in their care, as well as those who may worry about how their beneficiaries will spend the money bequeathed to them.

There are two other scenarios in which a trust can be very helpful:

•   People with a pet who have a specific plan of how they wish the pet to be cared for after their death. (Pets can’t own property, so leaving money to pets in a will can cause a legal headache. This can be sidestepped by creating a trust for Fluffy’s care.)

•   Those who want to minimize ambiguity in who gets what, which could be helpful in the case of people who have had multiple marriages.

The most common type of trust within an estate plan is called a revocable living trust. This may also be called a living trust because, while you are alive, you can name yourself a trustee and have flexibility to make changes. These can often be created online, although an attorney can certainly be involved, guiding the process and answering any questions.

In setting up a trust, you will name a trustee. This is a person in charge of overseeing the trust according to the parameters you state. Unlike a will, where an executor will ensure beneficiaries get the property stated, a trust allows the creator to put guardrails around gifts, and for the trustee to ensure the guardrails are followed.

For example, you can specify in a trust that certain assets do not go to a beneficiary until they reach a certain age or milestone.

Recommended: Does Net Worth Include Home Equity?

Taking the Next Step in Will Writing and Estate Planning

There’s a lot of overlap between “creating a will” and “creating an estate plan,” and that ambiguity can lead to difficulty beginning the process. But creating a legal will, including guardianship documents for minor children, can be a good first step. Also, make sure you have power of attorney forms in place and any advanced directives; these can guide decision-making on your behalf if you were ever mentally or physically incapacitated.

Then, you can have peace of mind and can “ladder up” to creating a more complex plan that encompasses more “what ifs.” Estate planning, with the possibility of trusts and transfers, can complete your end-of-life planning.


💡 Quick Tip: It’s recommended that you update your will every 3-5 years, and after any major life event. With online estate planning, changes can be made in just a few minutes — no attorney required.

The Takeaway

Creating a will and an estate plan are two different ways to address your end of life wishes. A will is a document that says who inherits what and how you want minors, dependents, and even pets cared for. It may have additional documents that spell out your wishes if you become incapacitated.

An estate plan, however, is a more comprehensive way to spell out the allocation of your assets after you die. It typically includes finding ways to make the process run more smoothly, quickly, and with lower tax payments for your beneficiaries. Starting the process now, whether with online templates or by consulting with an attorney, is important. While no one likes to think about worst-case scenarios, the sooner you get the paperwork done, the better protected your loved ones will be.

When you want to make things easier on your loved ones in the future, SoFi can help. We partnered with Trust & Will, the leading online estate planning platform, to give our members 15% off their trust, will, or guardianship. The forms are fast, secure, and easy to use.

Create a complete and customized estate plan in as little as 15 minutes.


Photo credit: iStock/AnnaStills

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Ladder, SoFi and SoFi Agency are separate, independent entities and are not responsible for the financial condition, business, or legal obligations of the other, Social Finance, LLC (SoFi) and Social Finance Life Insurance Agency, LLC (SoFi Agency) do not issue, underwrite insurance or pay claims under Ladder Life™ policies. SoFi is compensated by Ladder for each issued term life policy.
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All services from Ladder Insurance Services, LLC are their own. Once you reach Ladder, SoFi is not involved and has no control over the products or services involved. The Ladder service is limited to documents and does not provide legal advice. Individual circumstances are unique and using documents provided is not a substitute for obtaining legal advice.


Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

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Social Finance, LLC ("SoFi") is compensated by Experian for each customer who purchases a policy through Experian from the site.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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46 Tips for Joining the Real World

30 Tips for Joining the Real World

Woo-hoo! You have your degree, perhaps a job offer, a place to live with a chill roommate, and you’ve found your favorite cafe where the cold brew is just right. Life is great, right?

Yes, it is. Even if you don’t have all of the items above checked off. Starting your independent, post-school life is an exciting time, and it’s a moment to learn all sorts of adulting skills.

To help you with that, here are 30 things to consider, learn, or do to help you as you discover everything from how to speak up in meetings to how to find an in-network doctor. Just as you were probably on the receiving end of a lot of tips for college or freshman advice, now it’s time to level up on post-grad life.

30 Tips for Recent College Grads

Whether you’re just out of college or several years out, you’re hardly alone if you feel you have lots of questions about post-grad life and how to live it. Read on for tips for joining the real world and finessing your finances, career, and personal life.

1. Tackle Your Overall Financial Situation

Your finances can include a ton of stuff, especially as you get older and your investments and income become more complex. But at its most basic, understanding your financial situation means knowing your credit score, taking stock of your outstanding debts, figuring out ways to pay off student loans (if you haven’t already), and understanding what your monthly bills are.


💡 Quick Tip: Ready to refinance your student loan? You could save thousands.

2. Embrace a Budget

Here’s another bit of advice for college grads: Once you know how much money you have, owe, and make, it’s time to figure out your budget. Even if you have one already, post-graduation is a perfect time to reconsider your budget and make updates as needed. Never made one before? The popular 50/30/20 budget can be a smart start.

3. Learn About Job Perks

No matter if your job is still shiny and new or an old hat at this point, it’s good to take time to review your employee handbook for perks you may have overlooked. Check out your company’s retirement plan types and health insurance plans. You’ll also want to review potential bonuses and perks, such as free gym memberships, commuting stipends, and the like.

4. Start Saving for Retirement

Seriously? Yes! This may not be the most fun thing to review (and likely wasn’t part of your college advice), but your future self will thank you. Take time to learn about a 401(k) plan that may be available at work and hopefully enroll. You want to at least contribute enough to get any company match, which is like free money.

No job yet or retirement plan you qualify for? Spend a bit of time learning about the different kinds of IRAs.

5. Evaluate Your Housing Costs

Location, local, location, right? Depending on said location, it can be hard to find affordable housing or even a job if your industry isn’t hot in your market. Before signing on the dotted line, consider how much home you can afford to rent. It can be expensive to live alone; having roommates can be a great way to save money.

6. Check Your Social Media

Even if you’ve already got a job, you may want to take stock of your social media. A professional online presence may help prevent current or future employers from second-guessing about hiring you. Those wild nights out with friends definitely don’t need to be broadcast via an account that’s public.

7. Network

Networking is crucial to helping you achieve your career goals. Whether through industry conferences or social media sites like LinkedIn, it’s smart to stay connected with professionals in your industry to get career advice and learn about job openings you may be the perfect fit for.

8. Schedule Some “You” Time

Even if you’ve already got a job, you may want to take stock of your social media. A professional online presence may help prevent current or future employers from second-guessing hiring you.

9. Start an Emergency Fund

Life is full of the unexpected, and that’s why it’s smart to have an emergency fund. Once you have a steady income, it’s wise to start an emergency fund, perhaps by a recurring automatic transfer into savings. Start slow and steady, and aim to build up to at least three to six months’ worth of living expenses in the bank. This will help protect you if you have an unexpected major car repair bill or job loss.

10. Find Your Medical Team

This tip is especially important if you’ve moved to a different state or city. Out-of-network bills can be costly, so having a doctor and knowing which hospitals are in-network can help you save money and stress in the long run. Ask coworkers, do online research, and don’t forget to explore where the nearest and best urgent care centers are.

11. Snag a First-Aid Kit and Emergency Bag

This may sound like your parents or grandparents talking, but no one sees an accident or disaster coming. You could get burned cooking brunch one Saturday, or a major storm could sweep through and leave you without power.

Store-bought first aid kits may be good starting points, but extra bandages, allergy relief pills, antacids, and other over-the-counter medicines will take your kit to the next level.

If you’re inclined to ready an emergency go-bag, consider packing at least three days’ worth of clothes, a mini first aid kit, cash, a flashlight, and other provisions you think you (and your pets or loved ones) may need if you need to leave your home in a rush.

12. Consider Life Insurance

Yes, you are young. But if your employer offers life insurance as a benefit, you may be wondering what it is — and whether you need it or should even pay more to increase the amount. So, how about a little research? Understanding life insurance policies can help you make the right decision for you. Even if you decide you don’t need it right now, you’ll be better prepared to sign up when the time is right.


💡 Quick Tip: If you have student loans with variable rates, you may want to consider refinancing to secure a fixed rate in case rates rise. But if you’re willing to take a risk to potentially save on interest — and will be able to pay off your student loans quickly — you might consider a variable rate.

13.Dive into Hobbies

Not everything you do has to relate to your career. In fact, it’s likely healthier if you have interests outside of your career. You can learn to play instruments, sing, run, join a local soccer team, play games online, or enjoy any other hobby that helps you unwind and relax. Or maybe you’ll want to give back and spend some time planting at a local park or prepping meals at a soup kitchen. Find some passions, and pursue them.

14. Tackle Your Taxes

Welcome to the world of taxes, which likely wasn’t part of your college advice. But now, if you’re employed (full-time, part-time, seasonally, side hustle, or whatever), it’s time to learn how to prepare for tax season, which can help you avoid filing them late. Whenever you get an important piece of paperwork that’ll affect your taxes (such as W2s, charitable contribution receipts, or even home office receipts), you can put these in a safe place so you’re ready to go come tax time.

Then, determine if you’ll do your taxes yourself (say, with tax software) or work with a income tax preparer to get your return in on time.

15. Find Your Work-Life Balance

Each person has their own idea for work-life balance. If you’re not sure what yours is, consider taking the first few months on the job to figure that out. Being a good employee, for instance, doesn’t have to mean being the first person at the office in the morning and the last one out at night. If you feel tired or overwhelmed, it may be time to dig into and renegotiate those work-life boundaries.

16. Master Basic Home Repairs

Home repair costs can add up (especially as the years unfurl). You could save a lot by doing them yourself, especially if or when you own your own place and don’t have a landlord to pay for those costs. Such problems as a clogged sink, broken light switch, and dripping shower head may be easier than you think to fix.

If you do have a landlord, you might even get a discount on your rent by making simple repairs yourself. Just be sure to get a signed agreement from your landlord outlining how that will work.

17. Be Smart About Subscriptions

Monthly subscriptions can be so appealing, whether that means Japanese snack of the month club, exercise gear, or language lessons via a fun app. But these add up over time, and it’s easy to forget how many you have going at a given moment. Consider looking at what you’re actually subscribed to. Do you really need Max, Hulu, Peacock, and Netflix, or could you save on streaming services by dropping one (or two)? And do you really need so many gym passes and coffee clubs? Take a closer look, and spend less.

18. Learn to Cook

Takeout is great, but you could save money on food and healthy up your meals if you cook at home. It’s also helpful to plan your groceries ahead of time to avoid overspending and food waste. Plus, it’s a fun pursuit with loads of free recipes and cooking videos available online. Invite a friend over and make it a social occasion.

19. Speaking up in Meetings

If you think you don’t have much to add to the conversation, agreeing with what someone has said — and tacking on an extra thought — can be a way to participate and not feel like a wallflower.

20. Tweak Your Sleep Hygiene

Getting enough high-quality sleep can be a key contributor to your wellness. Going to sleep around the same time every night can help to ensure you get enough zzz’s so you can make good decisions and keep healthy habits. And here’s a reminder that taking your mobile device to bed with you is likely to lead to an hour or more of rabbit holes that rob you of your rest.

21. Invest Some Money

The idea of investing may sound intimidating, but you don’t have to be a Wall Street wolf to invest. Many rookies start small. Learn more about investing in your 20s and perhaps open an account.

22. Find a Mentor

If there’s someone higher up the ladder at your workplace with whom you click and who offers great guidance, ask them out for coffee to learn more about how their career progressed and see what advice they might share. You might wind up under their wing. You can also look for guidance via a professional group; you might find a mentor at a summit or similar event.

Mentors can often help you navigate your workplace, offer advice, and keep you motivated and sane when things get stressful. They also have contacts that may be helpful for you to know.

23. Change Your Mind

You’ve probably heard that tons of people end up with jobs outside of what they studied, even after getting a master’s or MBA. It could be that there aren’t a lot of jobs in that field –or maybe they realized that what’s interesting in theory is not in practice. If this turns out to be the case for you, just remember that fulfillment can be found outside of work. And people can change their minds.

24. Get Help

Unemployment, Medicaid, and other social nets exist for a reason. There are going to be choppy waters, and these services are meant to help. Using them because you got laid off or furloughed isn’t shameful. And if you can’t find employment, that’s another reason to get support vs. staying silent and toughing it out.

25. Put Home Maintenance on Your Calendar

When was the last time you cleaned your dryer vents? Do you know how to change the filter in your HVAC? Avoiding these kinds of things for too long can result in big maintenance bills — and potentially be a safety hazard. Not sure what to clean? Check out a house maintenance list and put reminders in your mobile device’s calendar.

26. Travel

Hopping on a plane and traveling to far-flung places can get a lot harder to do the more “adult” you become. It can be harder to take time off work, and perhaps you’ll have a family, meaning you will need a bigger travel budget. Now, when you’re young and probably okay with “roughing it,” it’s possible to travel cheap!

27. Learn to Say No

When you were younger, you probably didn’t have a lot of say in things; you did what your parents or professors said you had to. How times have changed! Don’t want to go out for drinks? Can’t finish that report by Monday? Your best bet may be to just be honest. Taking on too much may only backfire, so learning to say no without feeling guilty can be important for your mental health and work-life balance.

28. Avoid Lifestyle Creep

As time passes, you may well get raises and bonuses. And lifestyle creep can become a problem. What’s that? It’s the situation in which the more your income increases, the more you spend. While a pay raise may mean you can splurge a bit, if you wind up renting a bigger house, leasing a luxury car, and treating yourself to a week in Tulum, you could wind up in the hole. Instead, treat yourself within reason, and plow more money into savings, such as for a down payment on a future home.

Recommended: 9 Tips for Finding the Best Deals Online

29. Outfit Your Home Office

Are you going to be working from home for some or all of your week? Having ergonomic, comfortable, and functional furniture can help keep your back and neck from hurting and your mind from getting distracted. Don’t just perch on the couch or in bed with your laptop. Scan home office ideas if you’re in need of some inspiration.

30. Give Back

You’re joining the ranks of adults, so do the right thing and find a way to contribute and help others. Maybe you can spend some time on the weekend at a Habitat for Humanity site or make a charitable donation to a favorite cause.

The Takeaway

Your post-college years can be exciting and fun but also a bit confusing and challenging at times. Start with a few items on this list, and work your way through to build your life skills, launch your career, and manage your money confidently.

And if your student loan payments are getting in the way of you living your best post-college life, you may want to consider refinancing your student loans.

Looking to lower your monthly student loan payment? Refinancing may be one way to do it — by extending your loan term, getting a lower interest rate than what you currently have, or both. (Please note that refinancing federal loans makes them ineligible for federal forgiveness and protections. Also, lengthening your loan term may mean paying more in interest over the life of the loan.) SoFi student loan refinancing offers flexible terms that fit your budget.


With SoFi, refinancing is fast, easy, and all online. We offer competitive fixed and variable rates.

Photo credit: iStock/Rattankun Thongbun


SoFi Student Loan Refinance
If you are a federal student loan borrower, you should consider all of your repayment opportunities including the opportunity to refinance your student loan debt at a lower APR or to extend your term to achieve a lower monthly payment. Please note that once you refinance federal student loans you will no longer be eligible for current or future flexible payment options available to federal loan borrowers, including but not limited to income-based repayment plans or extended repayment plans.


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SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

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