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Millennials Are Seeking Prenups—and It Might Just Be Worth Considering

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Is MBA debt worth it?

How One MBA Grad Became a Total Minimalist—and Paid Off $90K in Debt

Joe Mihalic is a changed man. In 2011, he led the typical the Harvard-MBA lifestyle, with a lucrative job at a big tech company, a house in the suburbs, two cars and a motorcycle, and frequent travel—but he felt trapped. “I wasn’t working at a company I loved or in a job I loved. I wasn’t living a life I loved,” Joe says. So he changed his life drastically, becoming a minimalist. And that decision led him to pay off $90,000 in student loan debt in just seven months.

Joe, who lives in Austin, Texas, chronicled his journey to payoff success in his blog No More Harvard Debt. His posts resonated with many young grads, and his blog went viral in 2012. Now debt-free and an operations manager at a company he loves, Joe says he’s found inner peace. But he hasn’t let go of his frugal lifestyle— his work shoes attest to that. While paying down his loans, he wore the same shoes, even as holes appeared in them. Today, he won’t buy a new pair of shoes until the soles wear out.

Joe didn’t take every possible road to pay off his student loans—for example, he didn’t refinance, or take advantage of a student loan forgiveness program. But his “all in” approach offers many takeaways for MBA grads facing mortgage-sized loan debt.

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SoFi's 2017 Pharmacy School Rankings

SoFi’s 2017 Pharmacy School Rankings—What You’ll Make and What You’ll Owe

If you’re an aspiring pharmacist, you probably have a long list of wants and needs in a pharmacy school. You’d like a top pharmacy program with stellar faculty members and, because you want to put your four years of training to good use, you need a school that boasts a high rate of graduate employment and commands a great salary. After all, top pharmacy programs don’t come cheap.

In its study of first-year tuition and fees for Pharm.D. degree programs for 2016-2017, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) reports that Pacific University, a private school in Oregon, is among the priciest pharmacy schools at $70,947 for both out-of-state and in-state students. On the other side of the tuition scale, the University of Toledo, a state school in Ohio, costs $17,390 for out-of-state students and $8,052 for in-state students.

Your tuition bills and mandatory student fees will certainly add up over four years. So, along with a degree, your future likely holds a fair amount of student debt. The AACP also reports that Pharm.D. graduates carry an average of $157,425 in student loan debt. For grads of private pharmacy schools, that figure shoots to $182,417; for students of Pharm.D. programs at public colleges and universities the loan debt average is slightly less, at $131,153. But the good news is that graduates also earn solid salaries. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median salary of pharmacists was $121,500 in 2015.

To help you decide which program is best for your career and financial goals, we’ve crunched the numbers from more than 19,000 student loan refinance applications from January 2014 to February 2017 to bring you the SoFi Return on Education (ROED) Pharmacy School Rankings.

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7 Mistakes to Avoid When Choosing a Student Loan Cosigner

7 Easily Avoidable Mistakes When Choosing (or Removing) a Student Loan Cosigner

A good education will help you achieve your career goals, but your degree comes with a staggering price tag—one that’ll definitely hit you with sticker shock. Consider this: In 2015, the average college debt at graduation ranged from $3,000 to $53,000.

While there are plenty of scholarship, grant, loan, and refinancing options available to college students, they’re not all easy to get. In some cases, you’ll simply be able to sign on the dotted line once your applications are approved. But in other cases, such as with private student loans, you might need a co-signer—a creditworthy individual who will be legally responsible for repayment should you default, become disabled, or die.

If you’re just starting school and lack the steady income and solid credit history required for approval, a co-signer will help you clear the approval hurdle. And if you already have a student loan and that debt (and the interest that comes with it) is weighing you down, a co-signer can be your refinancing angel. In either situation, you’ll be in good company: In 2015-2016, about 94% of undergraduate private student loans included a co-signer, as did 61% of graduate private student loans.

Before you jump in, though, make sure you understand the dos and don’ts of choosing—and removing—a student loan co-signer.

(And while you’re at it, check out SoFi’s new Student Loan Debt Navigator tool to asses your student loan repayment options.)

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How the World's Top Five Nations Handle Student Loan Debt

How The World’s Top 5 Nations in Education Handle Student Loan Debt

Concerns about the rising cost of college in the United States—and the $1.4 trillion in student loan debt nationwide—are alive and well. And they’ve prompted a lot of discussion about the different ways our educational peers nearby, across the pond, and beyond handle student loan repayment programs. When it comes to tuition costs and paying off student loans, the American system is unique—and not for all the reasons you might think.

It turns out that cheap or even free tuition doesn’t mean the end of student loans. Student loans are common even in countries with free tuition, because no matter where you go to college, you have to live somewhere and, of course, eat. Sweden gets a lot of attention because tuition there is free. Still, Swedish students borrow money for college just as frequently as Americans do—and about 70% of students in both countries have student loans. But Swedish students graduate with about $20,000 in debt, compared to about $30,000 for American graduates.

To explore how the rest of the world pays for learning, we looked at the most recent QS World University Rankings. Thirty-two of the top 100 schools are in the U.S. Another 32 are found in just four countries: the United Kingdom, Germany, Australia, and Canada. Below, we compare the way higher education is financed in all five nations, in descending rank order.

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