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Millennials Are Seeking Prenups—and It Might Just Be Worth Considering

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Millennials Find Apps More Helpful for Personal Finance Than Dating—But Still Aren’t Reaching Financial Goals.

Earlier this month, we shared results from our 2017 Millennials and Financial Resolutions survey. We discovered several trends and recent events that impact how millennials are thinking about forward-thinking financial topics. This week, we review the results of a second survey we conducted to learn why these young professionals aren’t reaching their financial goals, and how they compare to other generations.

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Millennials and 2017 financial resolutions

Post-college Millennials and 2017 Financial Goals: A World in Flux

For many Americans, the beginning of a new year is a time for self-reflection and personal goal-setting — losing those holiday pounds, learning a new language, or maybe getting to a better place with their finances.

As a personal finance company devoted to helping a new generation achieve prosperity, we decided we’d dive into the financial aspect of these resolutions, especially among younger Americans. We also wanted to see how recent events might have shaped those resolutions. So we surveyed more than 500 college-educated Americans ages 25-34 — the older cohort of U.S. Millennials — to find out their attitudes on a variety of forward-looking finance topics.

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Election Watch 2016: Millennial Money Edition

Millennials are positioned to make a big impact in this year’s presidential election—if they turn out to vote.

  • Young voters were a key factor in the election of Barack ObamaObama won 66 percent of the under-30 vote in 2008 and 60 percent in 2012.
  • Young voter turnout increased substantially in the last two elections. About half of eligible voters aged 18-29 voted in the 2008 and 2012 presidential elections, compared to less than 40% of voters that age during the 1990s.
  • Young voters have the numbers to make a difference. For the first time, the millennial voting population equals that of baby boomers.

Today’s 20- and 30-somethings are facing unprecedented financial challenges, like unemployment, stagnant wages, and student loan debt. This year’s election is a huge opportunity for young voters to make their voices heard. The presidential candidates are talking (a lot) about finances and the economy, and our next president’s actions will likely have a big impact on everyone’s financial future.

Check out our guide below to the 2016 presidential candidates and their stances on the issues that impact young professionals’ financial health.

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4 Financial Strategies for Beating the Millennial Wealth Gap

For young professionals today, there’s been a “good news, bad news” financial scenario developing for a while now.

Good news first: The unemployment rate for college grads, ages 22-27, is finally on the decline. Recent data from the New York Fed outlines a 7.1 percent unemployment rate in March 2011 and a 4.9 percent in 2015.

The bad news? Despite the fact that there are more jobs available for younger workers, widespread wage stagnation and decline has made it hard for 20- and 30-somethings to play financial catch up. Add to that a record volume of student loan debt, and you’ve got an entire generation suffering from a generational “wealth gap.”

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