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Financial Aid 101

Wisconsin Student Loan & Scholarship Information

Wisconsin may be known as America’s Dairyland, but there is a lot more to this great state than farming. For starters: It has a topnotch education system. No wonder over 280,000 undergrads are currently studying there. It has all kinds of options for earning a degree – whether University of Wisconsin-Madison, with 30,000-plus undergrads or Beloit College, with its enrollment of 1,400 suits your style.

Attending any college can be pricey. But if you have your sights set on a Wisconsin education, there are many options that can help make your degree more affordable. Here, we’ll share the latest on Wisconsin student loans, grants, and scholarships, as well as loan forgiveness programs.

Average Student Loan Debt in Wisconsin

Between hitting the books and joining in on the tailgating fun, Wisconsin students may pause to wonder what the average student loan debt in Wisconsin is. For the record, in 2020, 63% of Wisconsin college attendees had student loan debt, and on average owed $30,270.

63%

of Wisconsin college
attendees had student
loan debt.

SoFi offers simple student loans that work for you.

Wisconsin Student Loans

If your goal is to attend school in Wisconsin and you’re looking at ways to finance your education, you have options. And both federal and private student loans may be worth considering when researching how to pay for your college degree.

Federal Student Loans

Federal student loans are all provided by the U.S. Department of Education’s William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program. If you take out a federal loan, the U.S. Department of Education is your lender.

To see which type of loan you may qualify for, you’ll need to fill out the (FAFSA®) form to apply for financial aid for college or grad school. You can review your state’s deadline and the federal FAFSA deadline.

You should also review the deadlines for each college to which you are applying, as one college may define their deadline as the date you submit your FAFSA form, while another considers it to be the date on which your FAFSA is actually processed. FAFSA will then offer you a financial aid package, dependent on your college, that may include grants, work-study opportunities, and federal student loan options. It is important to note that not every student will qualify to receive federal aid.


Recommended: FAFSA Guide

Direct Subsidized Loans: These are for eligible undergraduate students who demonstrate financial need, and they help cover the costs of higher education at a college or career school. The federal government pays the interest on Direct Subsidized Loans while a student is in school at least half-time. Interest starts accruing on these loans after a six-month grace period once students graduate or if they drop below half-time enrollment.

Direct Unsubsidized Loans: Eligible undergraduate, graduate, and professional students may qualify for these loans. Eligibility is not based on financial need. The interest on these loans begins accruing immediately after funds are disbursed (meaning paid out).

Direct PLUS Loans: These loans are for graduate or professional students, as well as for parents of dependent undergraduate students who need help paying for education expenses not covered by other financial aid. Eligibility for this loan is not based on financial need, but it does require a credit check.

Direct Consolidation Loans: As the name implies, this type of federal loan combines all of your eligible federal student loans into a single loan, with one loan payment. Students generally use this loan if they have taken out multiple federal loans and want to combine them for simplified repayment. The interest rate on these loans are the weighted average of the interest rates on all of the loans that a student is consolidating, rounded to the nearest one-eighth of 1%.

NOTE: All federal student loans have fixed interest rates, and they generally have lower interest rates than private loans.


Recommended: Types of Federal Student Loans

Private Student Loans

Private loans are funded by private organizations such as banks, online lenders, credit unions, some schools, and state-based or state-affiliated organizations. Federal student loans have interest rates that are regulated by Congress. A key point to note: Private lenders follow a different set of regulations than federal loans, so their interest rates can vary widely.

What’s more, private loans have variable or fixed interest rates that may be higher than federal loan interest rates, which are always fixed. Private lenders may (but don’t always) require you to make payments on your loans while you are still in school. On the other hand, you don’t have to start paying back federal student loans until after you graduate, leave school, or change your enrollment status to less than half-time.

Unlike federal loans which can only be applied for within certain deadlines (once a year, and states have their own deadlines), private loans can be applied for on an as-needed basis. Even if you suspect you may need to take out a private loan, it’s still a smart move to submit your FAFSA before applying. That way, you can see what federal aid you may qualify for first.

If you’ve missed the FAFSA deadline and you’re struggling to pay for school throughout the year, private loans can potentially help you make your education payments. Just keep in mind that you will need enough lead time for your loan to process and for your lender to send money to your school.


Recommended: Private Students Loans vs Federal Student Loans

For more information on private loans, you can check out our article:

Private Student Loans 101


Scholarships & Grants

Who doesn’t love a gift? You may sometimes hear grants and scholarships referred to as gift aid. That’s because while grants or scholarships may have certain academic or other requirements to keep them, you usually don’t have to pay them back as you would with a loan. Whether you call that a gift, a windfall, or free money, it’s a huge help when it comes time to pay for higher education.

There are a few instances where you may have to pay back grant money, but typically only if certain requirements aren’t met. Generally, grants are need-based (meaning they are distributed due to your financial need), while scholarships are awarded based on merit (such as academic, athletic, or artistic achievement).

There is no one-size-fits-all grant or scholarship amount or requirements, and both scholarships and grants can come from a variety of entities (including private organizations and federal or state governments).

Some scholarships or grants can be for a small amount that may help you pay for your books or research supplies, but others can cover the entire cost of your education. That means tuition, room and board, and the extras. Which is a very good thing. Who knew parking passes could be so expensive?

Wisconsin Scholarships & Grants

If you need help funding your education, there are plenty of scholarships for Wisconsin students you might apply for. Scholarships aren’t your only options—you should also consider applying for scholarships and grants for Wisconsin college students. Here are some options you may be eligible for.

GEAR UP Scholarship

Students enrolled in the GEAR UP program can apply for this scholarship as long as they are under 22 years old, are high school graduates, enrolled in a college or university in Wisconsin, and meet other select criteria. One-year scholarships go as high as $3,501.

Learn more

Talent Incentive Program Grants (TIP)

The purpose of this program is to provide additional college funding to low-income and disadvantaged Wisconsin students. This aid should help reduce the student’s amount of loan, work-study, or unmet financial need. Grant amounts range from $600 to $1,800 per school year.

Learn more

The Wisconsin Academic Excellence Scholarship

Eligible Wisconsin high school seniors who have the highest grade point average in each public and private high school throughout the State of Wisconsin are awarded this scholarship. Recipients receive $2,250 per year which will be applied toward tuition at select Wisconsin colleges.

Learn more

Wisconsin Professional Police Association Scholarship Program

Wisconsin residents who enroll in a college or vocational/technical school may qualify for this scholarship—as long as they are in a course of study leading to a two- or four-year degree in police science, criminal justice, or a law enforcement-related field.

Learn more

Arne Engebretsen Memorial Scholarship

This $2,000 scholarship opportunity is awarded to one Wisconsin high school senior who plans to major in mathematics education or to have a mathematics concentration at the elementary or middle school level.

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Wisconsin Towns Association Scholarship

Seven $1,000 scholarships are available to students who are graduating from a Wisconsin high school who are attending a Wisconsin public or private college or university in the fall of that year. An essay is submitted as part of the application process.

Learn more

Get low-rate in-school loans that work for you.

What Percentage of Students Have Scholarship Aid in Wisconsin?

Wisconsin ranks 24th in total financial aid dollars and spends $22.4 million on aid. Let’s take a closer look at how that aid is distributed.

Need-Based GrantsTotal Student AidState Average Spending Per Undergraduate Student
$122.3M$135.1M$601

Wisconsin Student Loan Repayment & Forgiveness Programs

If you’ve taken out student loans to attend a school in Wisconsin, it is never too early to start thinking about your repayment plan. And guess what? You have quite a few repayment options at your disposal.

Take a deep breath—you’ll have time to pay off your loans once you leave school. The standard student loan repayment term is 10 years, but allowances are made for eligible loan borrowers who need more time to pay off their loans (up to 25 years).

Federal student loan interest rates vary based on what year you receive the loan. For the 2022-2023 school year, the interest rate on Direct Subsidized or Unsubsidized loans for undergraduates is 4.99%, the rate on Direct Unsubsidized loans for graduate and professional students is 6.54%, and the rate on Direct PLUS loans for graduate students, professional students, and parents is 7.54%. The interest rates on federal student loans are fixed and are set annually by Congress.

For private loans, terms and conditions such as interest rates are set by the lender and vary due to many factors. Federal student loans typically offer the lowest interest rates and more flexible repayment options as compared to private student loans.

10

Years


Standard federal student
loan repayment term.


Allowances can be
made for borrowers.

Up to 25 years.

Federal Student Loan Repayment Options

Just like there are several types of loans to explore, there are also different kinds of repayment plans. You can learn more about your repayment options for federal student loans here, but the following high-level summaries can give you an idea of which repayment plan may work for you.

Standard Repayment Plan

Most borrowers are eligible for this plan and may often pay less over time than with other plans because the loan term is shorter. (Typically, less interest accrues over shorter loan terms than longer ones if payments are made in full and on-time.) There is a 10-year repayment period with this plan.

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Graduated Repayment Plan

Most borrowers are eligible for this plan, which allows them to pay their loans off over a longer period than the Standard Repayment Plan. Payments start relatively low, then increase over time (usually every two years).

Learn more

Extended Repayment Plan

To qualify for this plan, there are income thresholds for certain loan types to qualify, and you won’t qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) if you choose this loan. Monthly payments are typically lower than under the 10-year Standard Plan or the Graduated Repayment Plan. Borrowers may also have a longer period to pay them off (and therefore make more interest payments).

Learn more

Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE)

Direct Loan borrowers (and all Consolidation Loan borrowers) with eligible loan types may be able to choose this plan. Monthly payments are 10% of discretionary income, and any remaining loan balance will be forgiven after 20 years (for undergraduate studies) or 25 years (for graduate or professional studies).

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Pay As You Earn (PAYE)

To qualify for this plan, borrowers must have a higher debt relative to their discretionary income. Payments for this plan are capped at 10% of discretionary income (and never more than what would be paid on the Standard Repayment Plan. In addition, any remaining balance will be forgiven after 20 years.

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Income-Based Repayment (IBR)

IBR is designed for borrowers who have a high debt relative to their income in order to qualify. Monthly payments will not usually be higher than the 10-year Standard Plan amount. Generally, however, borrowers may pay more over time than under the Standard Plan.

Learn more

Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR)

Direct Loan borrowers with an eligible loan type may want to consider Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR). This plan is different from IBR because there is no financial hardship requirement. But, it may cost more over time when compared to the 10-year Standard Repayment Plan, and any remaining balance will be forgiven after 25 years.

Learn more

Income-Sensitive Repayment

Borrowers can expect to pay more over time than under the 10-year Standard Plan. Monthly payments are based on annual income, but loans will be paid in full within 15 years. This repayment plan is only available for FFEL Program loans, which are not eligible for PSLF.

Learn more


Still not sure which payment plan is right for you?

For more information on repayment plans, check out our Student Loan Repayment Options article to help add some clarity.

Granted, it’s not always easy to pay loans back on time. When it comes to student loan default, 10% to 20% of student loans are typically in default. (Of course, this was not the case during the pandemic-related federal student loan payment pause that began in March 2020.) You can go to the US Department of Education’s Federal Student Aid page to find the default rate for your specific education institution. To help you avoid being among those who default on your student loans, let’s take a look at refinancing options.


Student Loan Refinancing

Another option to potentially help accelerate student loan repayment is to refinance your student loans with a private lender. Some private lenders, like SoFi, will let you consolidate and refinance both your federal and private student loans into one loan and a single interest rate. It’s a great way to streamline your bill paying and financial life in general.

Consolidating your loans (aka combining them) under one lender gives you the opportunity to refinance your loan and get a new term and interest rate. If you have an improved financial profile compared to when you took out your original loan, you may be able to lower your interest rate when you refinance, or even shorten your term to pay off your loan more quickly!

But, it is important to remember that if you refinance federal student loans with a private lender, you will lose access to federal programs such as the income-driven repayment plans mentioned above, as well as student loan forgiveness and forbearance options.

Student Loan Forgiveness

At first glance, student loan forgiveness looks appealing, but it may not be as easily attainable as one might think. For example, 98% of those who applied to the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program were denied due to issues such as not meeting the program requirements or mistakes made on their forms.

That being said, there are state-specific and federal Public Service Loan Forgiveness programs that certain student loan borrowers may be eligible for.

Before you review your options, it’s important to know that the terms forgiveness, cancellation, and discharge essentially mean the same thing when it comes to federal student loans, but are applied in different scenarios. For example, if you are no longer required to make loan payments due to your job, that could fall under forgiveness or cancellation.

Or, if the school you received your loans at closed before you graduated, this situation would generally be called a discharge.

Even if you don’t complete your education, can’t find a job, or are unhappy with the quality of your education, you must repay your loans. But there are circumstances that may lead to federal student loans being forgiven, canceled, or discharged. Here are some of those options:

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF)

The PSLF Program may forgive the remaining balance on eligible Direct Loans, after 120 qualified monthly payments are made under a repayment plan (and working with a qualifying employer).

Learn more

Teacher Loan Forgiveness

Those who teach full-time for five complete and consecutive academic years in a low-income school or educational service agency (amongst other qualifications) may be eligible for forgiveness of up to $17,500 on select federal loans.

Learn more

Perkins Loan Cancellation

Cancellation for this specific loan is based on eligible employment or eligible volunteer service and the length of time applicants were in such a position, among other factors.

Learn more

Total and Permanent Disability Discharge

Qualification may relieve eligible borrowers from repaying a qualifying Direct Loan, a Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program loan, and/or a Federal Perkins Loan or to complete a TEACH Grant service obligation.

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Death Discharge

Due to the death of the borrower or of the student on whose behalf a PLUS loan was taken out, federal student loans may be discharged.

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Bankruptcy Discharge

Certain eligible borrowers may have federal student loans discharged if they file a separate action during bankruptcy, known as an “adversary proceeding.”

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Closed School Discharge

Borrowers who were unable to complete an academic program because their school closed might be eligible for a discharge of Direct Loans, Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program loans, or Federal Perkins Loans.

Learn more

False Certification of Student Eligibility or Unauthorized Signature/Unauthorized Payment Discharge

Due to a variety of circumstances, borrowers may be eligible to discharge Direct Loans or FFEL Program loans due to issues such as identity theft or mistakes made by a school.

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Unpaid Refund Discharge

Certain borrowers may be eligible for partial discharge of Direct Loans or FFEL Program loans if they withdrew from school, but the portion of a loan that the school was required to return to the borrower wasn’t returned.

Learn more

Wisconsin Specific Student Loan Forgiveness Programs

Federal loan forgiveness programs are a logical place to start, but it can be smart to also consider other student loan forgiveness programs, too. There are forgiveness programs tailored to loan borrowers who live in certain locations or have an in-demand and service-based vocation. Here’s an example of one such Wisconsin loan forgiveness program.

Rural Physician Loan Assistance Program

Primary-care physicians and psychiatrists that practice in rural communities may be eligible for up to $50,000 in loan assistance funds. In this program, the worksite does not have to be located in a Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) for the physician to qualify.

Learn more

SoFi Private Student Loans

In the spirit of complete transparency, we want you to know that we believe you should exhaust all of your federal grant and loan options before you consider a SoFi private student loan.

We believe that it is in each student’s best interest to look at federal financing options first in order to find the right financial aid package for them.

If you do decide a private student loan is the right fit for your educational needs, we’re happy to help! SoFi’s private student loan application process is easy and fast. We offer flexible payment options and terms and, don’t worry, there are absolutely zero fees.

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