Guide to Term Deposits

Guide to Term Deposits

A term deposit, also known as a certificate of deposit (CD) or time deposit, is a low-risk, interest-bearing savings account. In most cases, term deposit holders place their funds into an account with a bank or financial institution and agree not to withdraw the funds until the maturity date (the end of the term). The funds can earn interest calculated based on the amount deposited and the term.

This guide explains what a term deposit is in more detail, including the pros and cons of term accounts.

What Is a Term Deposit or Time Deposit?

Time deposit, term deposit, or certificate of deposit (CD) are all words that refer to a particular kind of deposit account. It’s an amount of money paid into a savings account with a bank or other financial institution. The principal can earn interest over a period that can vary from a month to years. There is usually a minimum amount for the deposit, and the earned interest and principal are paid when the term ends.

One factor to consider is that the account holder usually agrees not to withdraw the funds before the term is over. However, if they do, the bank will likely charge a penalty. Yes, that’s a downside, but consider the overall picture: Term deposits typically offer higher interest rates than other savings accounts where the account holder can withdraw money at any time without penalties.

Compared to stocks and other alternative investments, term deposits are considered low-risk (they’re typically insured by the FDIC or NCUA) for up to $250,000 per account holder, per account ownership category (say, single, joint, or trust), per insured institution. For these reasons, the returns tend to be conservative vs. higher risk ways to grow your funds.

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How Does a Bank Use Term Deposits?

Banks and financial institutions can make money through financing. For example, they likely earn a profit by issuing home, car, and personal loans and charging interest on those financial products. Thus, banks are often in need of capital to fund the loans. Term deposits can provide locked-in capital for lending institutions.

Here’s how many bank accounts work:

•   When a customer places funds in a term deposit, it’s similar to a loan to the bank. The bank will hold the funds for a set time and can use them to invest elsewhere to make a return.

•   Say the bank gives the initial depositor a return of 2.00% for the use of funds in a term deposit. The bank can then use the money on deposit for a loan to a customer, charging a 6.00% interest rate for a net margin of 4.00%. Term deposits can help keep their financial operation running.

Banks want to maximize their net interest margin (net return) by offering lower interest for term deposits and charging high interest rates for loans. However, borrowers may choose a lender with the lowest interest rate, while CD account holders probably seek the highest rate of return. This dynamic keeps banks competitive.

Recommended: Understanding the Different Types of Bank Accounts

How Interest Rates Affect Term Deposits

Term deposits and saving accounts in general tend to be popular when interest rates are high. That’s because account holders can earn a high return just by stashing their money with a financial institution. When market interest rates are low, though, people are more inclined to borrow money and spend on items like homes and cars. They may know they’ll pay less interest on loans, keeping their monthly costs in check. This can stimulate the economy.

When interest rates are low (as checking account interest rates typically are), the demand for term deposits usually decreases because there are alternative investments that pay a higher return. For example, stocks, real estate, or precious metals might seem more appealing, although these are also higher risk.

The interest rate paid on a term deposit usually depends on the amount deposited and the time until maturity. A larger deposit may earn higher interest, and a deposit for a longer period of time (says, a few years vs. a few months) may also reap higher rewards.

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Types of Term Deposits

There are two main types of term deposits: fixed deposits and recurring deposits. Here’s a closer look.

Fixed Deposits

Fixed deposits are a one-time deposit into a savings account. The funds cannot be accessed until the maturity date, and interest is paid only on maturity.

Recurring Deposits

With a recurring deposit, the account holder deposits a set amount in regular intervals until the maturity date. For example, the account holder might deposit $100 monthly for five months. Each deposit will earn less interest than the previous installment because the bank holds it for a shorter period.

In addition to these two types, you may see banks promoting different kinds of CDs, whether they vary by term length or by features (such as a penalty-free CD, meaning you aren’t charged if you withdraw funds early).

Opening a Term Deposit

To open a term deposit account, search online for the best interest rates, keeping in mind how much you want to deposit, how often, and for how long. Most banks will ask you to fill in an online application. Make sure you read and agree to the terms of the agreement. For example, check the penalties that apply if you decide to withdraw your funds early as well as the minimum amount required to earn a certain interest rate.

Closing a Term Deposit

A term deposit may close for two reasons — either the account reaches maturity or the account holder decides to end the term early. Each bank or financial institution will have different policies regarding the penalties imposed for breaking a term deposit. Read the fine print or ask a bank representative for full details.

When time deposit accounts mature, some banks automatically renew them (you may hear this worded as “rolled over” into a new account) at the current interest rate. It would be your choice to let that move ahead or indicate to the bank that you prefer to withdraw your money.

If you want to close a term deposit before the maturity date, contact your bank, and find out what you need to do and the penalties. The penalty will depend on the amount saved, the interest rate, and the term. The fee may involve the loss of some or all of interest earned. In very rare cases, your CD could lose value in this way.

Term Deposits and Inflation

Term deposits may not keep up with inflation. That is, if you lock into an account and interest rates rise over time, your money won’t earn more. You will likely still earn the same amount promised when you funded the account. Also, once tax is deducted from the interest income, returns on a fixed deposit may fall below the rate of inflation. So, while term deposits are safe investments, the interest earned can wind up being negligible. You might investigate whether high-yield accounts or stocks, for instance, are a better option.

Term Deposit Pros

What are the advantages of a term deposit versus regular high-yield savings account and other investments? Here are some important benefits:

•   Term deposit accounts are low-risk.

•   CDs or time deposits usually pay a fixed rate of return higher than regular savings accounts.

•   The funds in a CD or deposit account are typically FDIC-insured.

•   Opening several accounts with different maturity dates can allow the account holder to withdraw funds at intervals over time, accessing money without paying any penalties. This system is called laddering.

•   Minimum deposit amounts are often low.

Term Deposit Cons

There are a few important disadvantages of term deposit accounts to note, including:

•   Term deposits can offer lower returns than other, riskier investments.

•   Term deposits and CDs usually have fixed interest rates that do not keep up with inflation.

•   Account holders likely do not have access to funds for the length of the term.

•   Account holders will usually pay a penalty to access funds before the maturity date.

•   A term deposit could be locked in at a low interest rate at a time when interest rates are rising.

Examples of Bank Term Deposits

Here’s an example of how time deposits can shape up. Currently, Bank of America offers a Featured CD account: A 13-month Featured CD with a deposit of more than $1,000 but less than $10,000 pays 4.75% APY.

At Chase, a 9-month CD with a deposit of more than $1,000 but less than $10,000 pays 4.25% APY. If you have $100,000 or more to deposit, the APY rises to 4.75%.

Recommended: How Do You Calculate Interest on a Savings Account?

The Takeaway

Term deposits, time deposits, or CDs are conservative ways to save. Account holders place a minimum amount of money into a bank account for a set term at a fixed interest rate. The principal and interest earned can be withdrawn at maturity or rolled over into another account. If funds are withdrawn early, however, a penalty will likely be assessed.

While these accounts typically have a low interest rate, they may earn more than standard bank accounts. What’s more, their low-risk status can help some people reach their financial goals.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.


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FAQ

Can you lose money in a term deposit?

Most term deposits or CDs are FDIC-insured, which means your money is safe should the bank fail. However, if you withdraw funds early, you may have to pay a penalty. In a worst-case scenario, this could mean that you receive less money than you originally invested.

Are term deposits and fixed deposits the same?

There is usually no difference between a term deposit and a fixed deposit. They both describe low-risk, interest-bearing savings accounts with maturity dates.

Do you pay tax on term deposits?

With the exception of CDs put in an IRA, any earnings on term deposits or CDs are usually subject to federal and state income taxes. The percentage depends on your overall income and tax bracket. If penalties are paid due to early withdrawal of funds, these can probably be deducted from taxes if the CD or term deposit was purchased through a tax-advantaged individual retirement account (IRA) or 401(k).


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SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


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Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

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What Does Buying the Dip Mean?

What Does Buying the Dip Mean?

A down stock market could create an opportunity for investors to “buy the dip,” which, in simple terms, this strategy involves making an investment when stock prices are lower than they were at a previous time. The price has “dipped,” in other words.

Buying the dip is a way to capitalize on bargain pricing and potentially benefit from price increases down the line. But like any other investing strategy, buying the dip involves some risk — as it’s often a matter of market timing. Knowing when to buy the dip (or when not to) matters for building a solid portfolio while managing risk.

What Does It Mean to Buy the Dip?

As noted, to buy the dip means to invest when the stock market is down, anticipating that values will go back up. A dip occurs when stock prices drop below where they’ve previously been trading, but there’s an indication or expectation that they’ll begin to rise again at some point. This second part is crucial; if there’s no expectation that the stock’s price will bounce back down the line then there’s little incentive to buy in.

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Why Do Stock Dips Happen?

Stock market dips can happen for various reasons, including a macroeconomic downturn, unexpected geopolitical events, or general stock market volatility that causes stock prices to tumble temporarily on a broad scale.

For example, in early 2022, the stock market fell from all-time highs due to several developments, like high inflation, tighter monetary policy, and the economic fallout from the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Accordingly, the S&P 500 Index fell nearly 20% from early January 2022 through mid-May, 2022, flirting with bear market territory.

Stock pricing dips can also be connected directly to a particular company rather than overall market trends. If a company announces a merger or posts a quarterly earnings report that falls below expectations, those could trigger a short-term drop in its share price.

What’s the Benefit of Buying the Dip?

Many investors buy the dip because it may help increase their returns. But again, it’s not without risks.

Buying the dip is, effectively, a form of buying low and selling high – if, that is, everything shakes out in the investor’s favor. When you buy into a stock below its normal price, there is a potential – but not a guarantee – to reap significant profits by selling it later if prices rebound. It’s really as simple as that.

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Example of Buying the Dip

A hypothetical example of buying the dip could play out like this: Company A releases a quarterly earnings report that does not live up to expectations. As a result, its share price falls 5% on the day that report is released. But some investors have a hunch that Company A’s stock price will increase in the coming days, and buy shares at a reduced price.

Low and behold, share prices do rebound, increasing 10% over the next few days. Investors who bought at the dip sell, and reap a return.

As for a real-world example, the market experienced a larger dip and recovery during the spring of 2020 connected to economic fears surrounding the coronavirus pandemic. The S&P 500 Index declined about 34% in a little over a month, from February 19, 2020, to Mar. 23, 2020. The index then experienced a gradual rise, recouping its losses by August 2020 and increasing 114% through January 2022 from the March 2020 low.

If an investor bought at the lower end of the stock market crash, they would have seen substantial gains in the subsequent rally.

On an individual stock level, and as another hypothetical, say you’ve been tracking a stock that’s been trading at $50 a share. Then the company’s CEO abruptly announces they’re resigning — which sends the stock price tumbling to $30 per share as overall investor confidence wavers. So, you decide to buy 100 shares at the $30 price.

Six months later, a new CEO has been installed who’s managed to slash costs while boosting profits. Now that same stock is trading at $70 per share. Because you bought the dip when prices were low, you now stand to pick up a profit of $40 per share if you sell. The potential to earn big gains is what makes buying the dip a popular investment strategy for some people.

Risks of Buying the Dip

For any investor, it’s important to understand what kind of risk you’re taking when buying the dip. Timing the market is something even the most advanced investors may struggle with — as it’s impossible to perfectly predict which way stocks will move on any given day. Understanding technical indicators and what they can tell you about the market may help, but it isn’t foolproof.

For these reasons, knowing when to buy the dip is an inexact science. If you buy into a stock low and then are able to sell it high later, then your play has paid off. On the other hand, you could lose money if you mistime the dip or you mistake a stock that’s in freefall for one that’s experiencing a dip.

In the former scenario, it’s possible that a stock’s price could drop even further before it starts to rebound. If you buy in before the dip hits bottom, that can shrink the amount of profits you’re able to realize when you sell.

In the latter case, you may think a stock has the potential to recover but be disappointed when it doesn’t. You’ve purchased the stock at a bargain but the profit you’re able to walk away with, if anything, may be much smaller than you anticipated.

How to Manage Risk When Buying the Dip

For investors who are interested in buying the dip, there are a few things to keep in mind that may help with managing risk.

Understand Market Volatility

First, it’s important to understand how market volatility may impact some sectors or industries over others.

For example, take consumer staples versus consumer discretionary. Staples represent the things most people spend money on to maintain a basic standard of living, like food or personal hygiene products. Consumer discretionary refers to the “wants” people spend money on, like furniture or electronics.

In the event of a recession, people spend more on staples than discretionary expenses — so consumer staples stocks tend to fare better. But that may create a buying opportunity for discretionary stocks if they’ve taken a hit. That’s because as a recession begins to give way to a new cycle of economic growth, those stocks may start to pick back up again.

Consider the Reason for the Dip

Next, consider the reasons behind a dip and a company’s fundamentals. If you’ve got your eye on a particular stock and you notice the price is beginning to slide, ask yourself why that may be happening. When it’s specific to the company, rather than something general happening across the market, it’s important to analyze the stock and try to understand the underlying reasons for the dip — as well as how likely the stock’s price is to make a comeback later.

Buy the Dip vs Dollar-Cost Averaging

Buying the dip is more of a hands-on, active trading strategy, since it requires an investor to actively monitor the markets and read stock charts to evaluate when to buy the dip or when to sell. If an investor prefers to take a more passive approach or has a lower tolerance for risk, they might consider dollar-cost averaging instead.

Dollar-cost averaging is generally an investing rule worth keeping in mind. With dollar-cost averaging, an individual continues making new investments on a regular basis, regardless of what’s happening with stock prices. The idea here is that by investing consistently over time, one can generate returns in a way that smooths out the ups and downs of the market.

Example of Dollar-Cost Averaging

For example, you might invest $200 every month into an index mutual fund that tracks the performance of the S&P 500. As time goes by and the S&P experiences good years and bad years, you keep investing that same $200 a month into the fund.

You’ll buy shares during the dips and during the high points as well but you don’t have to actively track what’s happening with stock prices. This may be a preferable strategy if you lean toward a buy and hold investing approach versus active trading or you’re a investing beginner learning the basics.

The Takeaway

Buying the dip refers to purchasing shares at a price that is lower than a previous price, with the anticipation that values will recover and potentially overtake the previous peak. It can help investors increase returns, but as a strategy, has risks.

Knowing when to buy the dip can be tricky – timing the market usually is – but there are times when it may pay off for some. If investors maintain an eye on stock market and economic trends, it may help in determining when to buy the dip and how likely a stock or the market will rebound. However, it’s still important to consider the downside risks of timing the market and buying the dip.

Ready to invest in your goals? It’s easy to get started when you open an investment account with SoFi Invest. You can invest in stocks, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), mutual funds, alternative funds, and more. SoFi doesn’t charge commissions, but other fees apply (full fee disclosure here).

For a limited time, opening and funding an Active Invest account gives you the opportunity to get up to $1,000 in the stock of your choice.


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Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Earnings Call: Definition, Importance, How to Listen

Earnings calls and earnings reports recap a company’s quarter or fiscal year, giving investors critical information as to how a company is functioning and faring. Understanding what’s going on with stocks can be tricky for both new and seasoned investors. It’s not always clear where you can turn for accurate information that will help with investment decisions — that’s why earnings calls or reports may be helpful.

But an earnings report doesn’t tell the whole story. Therefore, companies will hold earnings calls to provide context and backstory behind the data in an earnings report to help investors make informed decisions.

What Is an Earnings Call?

An earnings call is a conference call between the management of a public company and any interested outside party — usually investors, analysts, and business reporters — to discuss the company’s financial results and future outlook. Earnings calls are generally held quarterly, in the form of a teleconference or webcast; anyone can listen to an earnings call.

The earnings call often comes on the heels of the release of an earnings report and covers a given reporting period, typically a fiscal quarter or fiscal year.

💡 Recommended: How To Know When to Buy, Sell, Or Hold a Stock

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) requires that public companies disclose certain financial information regularly and on an ongoing basis. Companies must file Form 10-Q quarterly reports during the first three fiscal quarters of the year. A 10-Q includes unaudited financial statements and provides the government and investors with a continuing account of the company’s financial position throughout the year.

For the fourth quarter of the year, a company will file a Form 10-K, an annual report that shares audited financial statements, a look at the company’s business overall, and financial conditions over the previous fiscal year. The financial information and metrics included on these reports, like earnings per share, is discussed during an earnings call.

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What Is the Importance of Earnings Calls?

An earnings call is important because it allows a company’s management to discuss pertinent financial information and a company’s outlook.

Publicly-traded companies are not required to hold earnings calls; they are only required to release the details of their financial performance in a Form 10-Q or Form 10-K. However, most public companies have quarterly conference calls to keep shareholders up to date with the latest financial developments and provide context beyond the earnings data.

Earnings calls are also important for investors, especially those practicing fundamental analysis. These calls help long-term investors decide whether or not to invest in or continue investing in a company. For short-term traders, earnings calls may be helpful to capitalize on short-term volatility in a stock’s price immediately following an earnings call.

💡 Recommended: How to Analyze a Stock

The Structure of an Earnings Call

A company will announce upcoming earnings calls several days or even several weeks before the event. The company will usually issue a press release containing dial-in or webcast access information for stakeholders interested in participating in the call.

Earnings calls are generally scheduled in the morning, before the stock market’s opening bell, or in the afternoon, following the end of the day’s trading. These calls occur shortly after an earnings report is made public.

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Safe Harbor Statement

When the call begins, a company representative will likely share a safe harbor statement, which is a disclaimer about some of the comments executives will make. Specifically, some statements might be “forward-looking” and discuss future revenue, margins, income, expenses, and overall business outlook. Because no company can predict the future, the SEC requires that each warns investors that forward-looking statements may differ from actual results and trends.

Overview of Financial Results

The earnings call is usually led by the CEO, CFO, or other senior executives. During the call, these executives will deliver prepared statements covering financial results and the company’s performance for the reporting period.

This section of the call allows company leaders to give a more in-depth look at the company from their own eyes beyond the data found in the earnings reports. Executives may discuss market trends or even unpredictable factors that could influence how the company moves forward. Management will also likely share risks and their plans to take them on.

Question and Answer Session

At the end of the call, there may be a chance for investors and analysts to ask questions about the financial results the company presents. However, not everyone will get to ask a question. The company’s management may answer these questions, or they may decline or defer answering until they have the correct information to make an accurate response.

Preparing for an Earnings Call as a Shareholder

Before listening in on an earnings call, it may help to research the company and its earnings history and listen to previous earnings calls. Here’s additional information to know how to listen to an earnings call.

Where to Find Earnings Call Info?

Companies will send out a press release announcing when they will give an earnings call. Investors can also check the investor relations section of a company’s website for scheduled earnings calls. Additionally, some financial news websites may keep calendars of expected upcoming earnings reports and calls investors can check to stay current.

Many companies will post audio from the call on their website, making it available to investors and analysts for a few weeks. Companies also frequently offer transcripts of the call to read. This is especially useful for investors who may have missed an earnings call.

Much of the information discussed in conference calls, including Forms 10-Q and 10-K, are part of the public record and searchable on the SEC’s website. To find a company’s public filings, the SEC has a searchable Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval system (EDGAR).

How Long is an Earnings Call?

An earnings call usually lasts for less than an hour. However, there are no requirements for how long an earnings call should be.

What to Listen For

Investors should treat earnings calls as valuable information on a company but know that it doesn’t typically paint the complete picture of its potential performance.

Some key things investors should listen for in an earnings call are:

•   How the company performed compared to analysts’ expectations

•   What the company attributes its financial performance to

•   Any changes in guidance for the future

•   Any significant challenges or headwinds the company is facing

•   Questions from analysts and how management responds to them

💡 Recommended: The Ultimate List of Financial Ratios

Additionally, it may help to listen to the tone of the company’s executives when they are talking about the company’s performance. It isn’t quantifiable, but learning to pick up on the tone of management’s description of the company’s financials and the answers to analysts’ questions can help investors better understand the outlook for the company.

The Takeaway

Earnings calls provide investors with valuable insights into a company’s financial performance and outlook. These calls, paired with quarterly earnings reports, give investors a thorough understanding of the company, which helps with making investment decisions.

While earnings calls and earnings reports can be helpful to investors, keep in mind that they don’t tell the whole story. You’ll want to do your due diligence and further research to better inform your investment decisions, too.

Ready to invest in your goals? It’s easy to get started when you open an investment account with SoFi Invest. You can invest in stocks, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), mutual funds, alternative funds, and more. SoFi doesn’t charge commissions, but other fees apply (full fee disclosure here).

For a limited time, opening and funding an Active Invest account gives you the opportunity to get up to $1,000 in the stock of your choice.


SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Claw Promotion: Customer must fund their Active Invest account with at least $25 within 30 days of opening the account. Probability of customer receiving $1,000 is 0.028%. See full terms and conditions.

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Guide to 529 Savings Plans vs ESAs

Saving for college may help minimize the need to take out student loans to pay for school. Education Savings Accounts (ESAs) and 529 plans both allow you to save on a tax-advantaged basis, but there are some key differences in how they work.

Comparing the features of Education Savings Accounts vs. 529 plans, as well as the pros and cons, can help you decide which one is right for your needs.

Education Savings Accounts (ESAs) vs 529 Savings Plans

Education Savings Accounts and 529 plans are both designed to help you save money for qualified education expenses. In other words, they’re accounts you can use to save money for college, as well as potentially other types of schooling.

These plans can help you avoid a situation where you’re using retirement funds for college. On some levels, they’re quite similar but there are notable differences between the two options, as well.

Similarities

When putting an ESA vs. 529 plan side by side, you’ll notice that they have some features in common. Here’s how they overlap:

•   Contributions to ESA and 529 plans, made with after-tax dollars, grow on a tax-free.

•   Withdrawals are tax-free when funds are used to pay for qualified education expenses, as defined by the IRS.

•   You’re not limited to using ESA or 529 plan funds for college; both allow some flexibility in paying for elementary and secondary school expenses.

•   Non-qualified withdrawals from ESAs and 529 plans may be subject to taxes and penalties, with some exceptions.

•   Both plans allow you to transfer savings to another beneficiary if your student opts not to go to college or there’s money remaining after paying all of their education expenses.

Differences

The differences between a 529 plan vs. ESA largely center on who can contribute, contribution limits, and when funds must be used. Here’s how the two diverge:

•   ESA contributions are limited by the IRS to $2,000 per child, per year, while 529 plans typically don’t have annual contribution limits.

•   Income determines your ability to contribute to an ESA but doesn’t affect your eligibility to open a 529 plan.

•   ESA contributions are only allowed up to the beneficiary’s 18th birthday unless they’re a special needs beneficiary.

•   Remaining funds in an ESA must be withdrawn by the beneficiary’s 30th birthday unless they’re a special needs beneficiary.

•   529 plans have no age limits on who can be beneficiaries, how long you can make contributions, or when funds must be withdrawn.

Education Savings Account

529 College Savings Plan

Income Limits Individuals must be within MAGI limits to contribute Anyone can contribute, regardless of income
Annual Contribution Limit $2,000 per child None, though contributions above the annual gift tax exclusion limit may trigger the gift tax

Contributions are subject to lifetime limits imposed by each state, but these are much higher, typically ranging from about $300,000 to $500,000

Eligible Beneficiaries Students under the age of 18 or special needs students of any age Students of all ages, including oneself, one’s spouse, children, grandchildren, or other relatives
Investment Options May include stocks, bonds, and mutual funds Typically limited to mutual funds
Tax Treatment of Withdrawals Withdrawals for qualified higher education expenses are tax-free; all other withdrawals are subject to tax and penalties Withdrawals for qualified higher education expenses are tax-free; all other withdrawals are subject to tax and penalties
Qualified Expenses Withdrawals can be used to pay for elementary, secondary, and higher education expenses, including tuition, fees, books, and equipment Withdrawals can be used to pay for qualified higher education expenses, including tuition, fees, books, and equipment, as well as K-12 tuition, eligible apprenticeship expenses, and qualified education loan repayments
Required Distributions All funds must be withdrawn by age 30 or rolled over to another beneficiary, unless the beneficiary is a special needs student Funds can remain in the account indefinitely or be rolled over to another beneficiary
Financial Aid Treated as parental assets for FAFSA purpose Treated as parental assets for FAFSA purposes

Boost your retirement contributions with a 1% match.

SoFi IRAs now get a 1% match on every dollar you deposit, up to the annual contribution limits. Open an account today and get started.


Only offers made via ACH are eligible for the match. ACATs, wires, and rollovers are not included.

💡 Quick Tip: Are self-directed brokerage accounts cost efficient? They can be, because they offer the convenience of being able to buy stocks online without using a traditional full-service broker (and the typical broker fees).

What Is an ESA?

An Education Savings Account, now known as a Coverdell Education Savings Account (ESA), is a trust or custodial account intended for education savings. ESAs allow flexibility since you can use them to save for college but the IRS also allows withdrawals for qualified elementary and secondary school expenses.

Pros and Cons of ESAs

If you’re considering an ESA versus 529 plan, it’s important to consider the advantages and potential downsides. While ESAs offer tax benefits, there are some limitations to be aware of.

Pros:

•   Tax-deferred growth. Funds in an ESA grow tax-deferred, meaning you pay no tax on the earnings in the account until you begin making withdrawals.

•   Tax-free distributions. As long as the money you withdraw is used for qualified education expenses, you’ll pay no tax on ESA funds.

•   Multiple uses. Money in an ESA can pay for a variety of expenses, including college tuition and fees, books and supplies, and room and board for students enrolled at least half-time. Parents of elementary and secondary school students can use the funds for private school tuition, academic tutoring, and school-mandated costs of attendance, such as uniforms or room and board.

Cons:

•   Contribution limits. You can only contribute $2,000 per year to an ESA, which is well below the amount you could save in a 529 plan.

•   Income caps. Single filers with a modified adjusted gross income exceeding $110,000 and married couples filing jointly with a MAGI over $220,000 cannot contribute to an ESA.

•   Age restrictions. You can’t contribute anything to an ESA once the beneficiary turns 18 and they must withdraw all remaining funds by age 30. Those distributions are subject to tax.

💡 Quick Tip: How do you decide if a certain trading platform or app is right for you? Ideally, the investment platform you choose offers the features that you need for your investment goals or strategy, e.g., an easy-to-use interface, data analysis, educational tools.

What Is a 529 Savings Plan?

A 529 savings plan or Qualified Tuition Program (QTP) is a tax-advantaged account that you can use to save for education expenses. All 50 states offer at least one 529 account and you don’t need to be a resident of a particular state to contribute to its plan.

In addition to 529 savings plans, some states offer 529 prepaid tuition plans. These plans allow you to “lock in” rates, offering some predictability when it’s time to pay for your child’s college tuition.

Pros and Cons of 529 Savings Plans

There may be a lot to like about 529 savings plans but like ESAs, there are also some potential downsides to consider.

Pros:

•   Contribution limits. There are no IRS limits on annual contributions to a 529 plan and states can determine where to set aggregate contribution limits.

•   Eligibility. One of the advantages of a 529 savings plan is that anyone can contribute, regardless of income, and there are no age restrictions on who can be a beneficiary.

•   Tax benefits. Earnings grow tax-deferred and qualified withdrawals are tax-free.

•   Funds use. 529 plan funds can be used to pay for qualified college expenses, K-12 private school tuition, qualified education loan repayment, and eligible apprenticeship expenses.

Cons:

•   Tax penalties. Non-qualified withdrawals are subject to a 529 withdrawal penalty and taxes.

•   Tax breaks. There are no federal tax deductions or credits for 529 plan contributions and while some states offer them, they may only be available to residents.

•   Investment options. Compared to ESAs, 529 education savings plans may offer fewer investment options; it’s also important to consider the investment fees you might pay.

Which Savings Plan Is Right for You?

Deciding when to start saving for college for your child is the first question to tackle; where to do it is the next. Whether you should choose an Education Savings Account vs. 529 plan may hinge on your eligibility for either plan and your ability to save.

You might choose an Education Savings Account if you…

•   Are within the income thresholds allowed by the IRS

•   Would like a broader range of investment options to choose from

•   Are comfortable with control of the account being transferred to the beneficiary when they turn 18

On the other hand, you might prefer a 529 plan if you…

•   Want to be able to contribute more than $2,000 a year to the plan

•   Don’t want to be limited by age restrictions for contributions or withdrawals

•   Qualify for a state tax deduction or credit for making 529 contributions

You may also lean toward a 529 if you want more options concerning how you use the funds. While you can withdraw money from a 529 to repay student debt or pay for apprenticeship fees and supplies, you can’t do that with an ESA.

If you’re shopping for an ESA or 529 plan, consider the type of investment options offered and the fees you might pay. You might start with your current brokerage to see what college savings accounts are available, if any.

The Takeaway

Saving for college early and often gives you more time to grow your money through the power of compounding interest. If you’re torn between an Education Savings Account vs. 529 plan, remember that you don’t necessarily have to choose just one. You could use both to save for education expenses if you’re eligible to do so. Just remember to prioritize saving in your own retirement accounts along the way so that you’re not shortchanging your nest egg.

Ready to invest in your goals? It’s easy to get started when you open an investment account with SoFi Invest. You can invest in stocks, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), mutual funds, alternative funds, and more. SoFi doesn’t charge commissions, but other fees apply (full fee disclosure here).

For a limited time, opening and funding an Active Invest account gives you the opportunity to get up to $1,000 in the stock of your choice.

FAQ

Is it better to put money in a 529 or an education savings account?

One of the main advantages of a 529 savings plan is the opportunity to save more than you could with an ESA. At most, you can contribute $36,000 to an ESA, unless your student is a special needs beneficiary. States can offer 529 plans with aggregate contribution limits of $500,000 or more.

What is the downside of 529 accounts?

If you take money out of your plan for anything other than education, you’ll face a 529 withdrawal penalty. The penalty is 10% and you’ll also have to pay tax on the earnings you withdraw, which could make a non-qualified distribution expensive.

What happens to 529 if the child doesn’t go to college?

If you opened a 529 savings plan for your child and they decide not to go to college, you can transfer the money to a different beneficiary. You may select yourself as the beneficiary or choose your spouse, another child, a grandparent, or another relative.


Photo credit: iStock/kate_sept2004

SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Investment Risk: Diversification can help reduce some investment risk. It cannot guarantee profit, or fully protect in a down market.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

Claw Promotion: Customer must fund their Active Invest account with at least $25 within 30 days of opening the account. Probability of customer receiving $1,000 is 0.028%. See full terms and conditions.

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Avoid These 12 Common Retirement Mistakes

12 Common Retirement Mistakes You Should Avoid

Part of planning for a secure future is knowing what retirement mistakes to avoid that could potentially cost you money. Some retirement planning mistakes are obvious; others you may not even know you’re making.

Being aware of the main pitfalls, or addressing any hurdles now, can help you get closer to your retirement goals, whether that’s traveling around the world or starting your own business.

Planning for Retirement

Knowing what not to do in retirement planning is just as important as knowing what you should do when working toward financial security. Avoiding mistakes when creating your retirement plan matters because of how those mistakes could affect you financially over the long term.

The investment choices someone makes in their 20s, for example, can influence how much money they have saved for retirement by the time they reach their 60s.

The younger you are when you spot any retirement mistakes you may have made, the more time you have to correct them. Remember that preparing for retirement is an ongoing process; it’s not something you do once and forget about. Taking time to review and reevaluate your retirement-planning strategy can help you to pinpoint mistakes you may need to address.

12 Common Retirement Planning Mistakes

There’s no such thing as a perfect retirement plan — everyone is susceptible to making mistakes with their investment strategy. Whether you’re just getting started or you’ve been actively pursuing your financial goals for a while, here are some of the biggest retirement mistakes to avoid — in other words, what not to do in retirement planning.

1. Saving Too Late

There are many retirement mistakes to avoid, but one of the most costly is waiting to start saving — and not saving automatically.

Time is a vital factor because the longer you wait to begin saving for retirement, whether through your 401(k) or an investment account, the less time you have to benefit from the power of compounding returns. Even a delay of just a few years could potentially cost you thousands or even hundreds of thousands of dollars in growth.

Here’s an example of how much a $7,000 annual contribution to an IRA that’s invested in mutual funds might grow by age 65. (Estimates assume a 7% annual return.)

•   If you start saving at 25, you’d have $1,495, 267

•   If you start saving at 35, you’d have $707,511

•   If you start saving at 45, you’d have $307,056

As you can see, waiting until your 40s to start saving would cost you more than $1 million in growth. Even if you get started in your 30s, you’d still end up with less than half the amount you’d have if you start saving at 25. The difference underscores the importance of saving for retirement early on — and saving steadily.

This leads to the other important component of being an effective saver: Taking advantage of automatic savings features, like auto transfers to a savings account, or automatic contributions to your retirement plan at work. The less you have to think about saving, and the more you use technology to help you save, the more money you may be able to stash away.

2. Not Making a Financial Plan

Saving without a clear strategy in mind is also among the big retirement planning mistakes. Creating a financial plan gives you a roadmap to follow because it requires you to outline specific goals and the steps you need to take to achieve them.

Working with a financial planner or specialist may help you get some clarity on what your plan should include.

3. Missing Out on Your 401(k) Match

The biggest 401(k) mistake you can make is not contributing to your workplace plan if you have one. But after that, the second most costly mistake is not taking advantage of 401(k) employer matching, if your company offers it.

The employer match is essentially free money that you get for contributing to your plan. The matching formula is different for every plan, but companies typically match anywhere from 50% to 100% of employee contributions, up to 3% to 6% of employees’ pay.

A common match, for example, is for an employer to match 50% of the first 6% the employee saves. If the employee saves only 3% of their salary, their employer will contribute 50% of that (or 1.5%), for a total contribution rate of 4.5%. But if the employee saves 6%, they get the employer’s full match of 3%, for a total of 9%.

Adjusting your contribution limit so you get the full match can help you avoid leaving money on the table.

4. Bad Investing Strategies

Some investing strategies are designed to set you up for success, based on your risk tolerance and goals. A buy-and-hold strategy, for example, might work well for you if you want to purchase investments for the long term.

But bad investment strategies can cause you to fall short of your goals, or worse, cost you money. Some of the worst investment strategies include following trends without understanding what’s driving them, or buying high and selling low out of panic.

Taking time to explore different investment strategies can help you figure out what works for you.

5. Not Balancing Your Portfolio

Diversification is an important investing concept to master. Diversifying your portfolio means holding different types of investments, and different asset classes. For example, that might mean a mix of stocks, bonds, and cash.

So why does this matter? One reason: Diversifying your portfolio is a form of investment risk management. Bonds, for instance, may act as a balance to stocks as they generally have a lower risk profile. Real estate investment trusts (REITs) may be a hedge against inflation and has low correlation with stocks and bonds, which might provide protection against market downturns. However, it’s important to understand that diversification does not eliminate risk.

Balancing your holdings through diversification — and rebalancing periodically — could help you maintain an appropriate mix of investments to better manage risk. When you rebalance, you buy or sell investments as needed to bring your portfolio back in line with your target asset allocation.

💡 Quick Tip: For investors who want a diversified portfolio without having to manage it themselves, automated investing could be a solution (although robo advisors typically have more limited options and higher costs). The algorithmic design helps minimize human errors, to keep your investments allocated correctly.

6. Using Retirement Funds Too Early

Although the retirement systems in the U.S. are generally designed to help protect your money until you retire, it’s still possible to take early withdrawals from personal retirement accounts like your 401(k) or IRA, or claim Social Security before you’ve reached full retirement age.

•   Your 401(k) or IRA are designed to hold money you won’t need until you retire. Take money from either one before age 59 ½ and you could face a tax penalty. For example, 401(k) withdrawal penalties typically require you to pay a 10% early withdrawal tax on distributions. You’re also required to pay regular income tax on the money you withdraw, regardless of when you withdraw it.

Between income tax and the penalties, you might be left with a smaller amount of cash than you were expecting. Not only that, but your money is no longer growing and compounding for retirement. For that reason, it’s better to leave your 401(k) or IRA alone unless it’s absolutely necessary to cash out early.

And remember that if you change jobs, you can always roll over your 401(k) to another qualified plan to preserve your savings.

•   Similarly, your Social Security benefits are also best left alone until you reach full retirement age, as you can get a much higher payout. Full retirement age is 67 for those born in 1960 or later.

That said, many retirees who need the income may feel compelled to take Social Security as soon as it’s available, at age 62 — but their monthly check will be about 30% lower than if they’d waited until full retirement age. If you can, wait to claim your benefits and you’ll typically get substantially more.

7. Not Paying Off Debt

Debt can be a barrier to your retirement savings goals, since money used to pay down debt each month can’t be saved and invested for the future.

So should you pay off debt or invest first? As you’ve seen, waiting to start saving for retirement can be a mistake if it potentially costs you growth in your portfolio. However, it’s critical to pay off debt, too. If you’d like to get rid of your debt ASAP, consider how you can still set aside something each payday for retirement.

Contributing the minimum amount allowed to your 401(k), or putting $50 to $100 a month in an IRA, can add up over time. As you get your debts paid off, you can begin to divert more money to retirement savings.

8. Not Planning Ahead for Future Costs

Another mistake to avoid when starting a retirement plan is not thinking about how your costs may change as you get older. Creating an estimated retirement budget can help you get an idea of what your day to day living expenses might be. But it’s also important to consider the cost of health care, specifically, long-term care.

Medicare can cover some health expenses once you turn 65, but it won’t pay for long-term care in a nursing home. If you need long-term care, the options for paying for it include long-term care insurance, applying for Medicaid, or paying out of pocket.

Thinking ahead about those kinds of costs can help you develop a plan for paying for them should you require long-term care as you age. How do you know if you’ll need long-term care? You can consider the longevity factors in your family, as well as your own health, and gender. Women tend to live longer than men do, almost 6 years longer, which often puts older women in a position of needing long-term care.

9. Not Saving Aggressively Enough

How much do you need to save for retirement? It’s a critical question, and it depends on several things, including:

•   The age at which you plan to retire

•   Your potential lifespan

•   Your cost of living in retirement (i.e. your lifestyle)

•   Your investment strategy

Each of these factors requires serious thought and possibly professional advice in order to come up with estimates that align with your unique situation. Investing in the resources you need to understand these variables may be one of the most important moves you can make, because the bottom line is that if you’re not saving enough, you could outlive your savings.

10. Making Unnecessary Purchases

If you need to step up your savings to keep pace with your goals, cutting back on spending may be necessary. That includes cutting out purchases you don’t really need to make — but also learning how to be a smarter spender.

Splurging on new furniture or spending $5,000 on a vacation might be tempting, but consider what kind of trade-off you could be making with your retirement. Investing that $5,000 into an IRA means you’ll miss the trip, but you’ll get a better return for your money over time.

11. Buying Into Scams

Get-rich-quick schemes abound, but they’re all designed to do one thing: rob you of your hard-earned money. Investment and retirement scams can take different forms and target different types of investments, such as real estate or cryptocurrency. So it’s important to be wary of anything that promises “free money,” “200% growth,” or anything else that seems too good to be true.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) offers consumer information on the most common investment scams and how to avoid them. If you think you’ve fallen victim to an investment scam you can report it at the FTC website.

12. Gambling Your Money

Gambling can be risky as there’s no guarantee that your bets will pay off. This is true whether you’re buying lottery tickets, sitting down at the poker table in Vegas, or taking a risk on a new investment that you don’t know much about.

Either way, you could be making a big retirement mistake if you end up losing money. Before putting money into crazy or wishful-thinking investments, it’s a good idea to do some research first. This way, you can make an informed decision about where to put your money.

Investing for Retirement With SoFi

Retirement planning isn’t an exact science and it’s possible you’ll make some mistakes along the way. Some of the most common mistakes are just not doing the basics — like saving early and often, getting your company matching contribution, paying down debt, and so on. But even if you do make a few mistakes, you can still get your retirement plan back on track.

Ready to invest for your retirement? It’s easy to get started when you open a traditional or Roth IRA with SoFi. SoFi doesn’t charge commissions, but other fees apply (full fee disclosure here).

Help build your nest egg with a SoFi IRA.

FAQ

Why is it important to start saving early?

Getting an early start on retirement saving means you generally have more time to capitalize on compounding returns. The later you start saving, the harder you might have to work to play catch up in order to reach your goals.

What is the first thing to do when you retire?

The first thing to do when you retire is review your budget and financial plan. Consider looking at how much you have saved and how much you plan to spend to make sure that your retirement is off to a solid financial start.


Photo credit: iStock/Morsa Images

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Investment Risk: Diversification can help reduce some investment risk. It cannot guarantee profit, or fully protect in a down market.

Claw Promotion: Customer must fund their Active Invest account with at least $25 within 30 days of opening the account. Probability of customer receiving $1,000 is 0.028%. See full terms and conditions.

SOIN-Q224-1905222-V1

Read more
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