How Much a $450,000 Mortgage Will Cost You

A $450K mortgage payment is between $3,000 and $4,000 per month in the current interest-rate environment, depending on your loan type and term. This amount, however, does not include other variables that affect your payment, such as property taxes and insurance. Here’s the lowdown on what you can expect.

Cost of a $450,000 Mortgage

A $450K mortgage payment is primarily influenced by your loan term and interest rate. A 30-year loan at 7% interest would result in a monthly cost of $2,993 (not including taxes and insurance). But a 15-year loan at the same interest rate would have monthly payments of $4,044.


💡 Quick Tip: SoFi’s Lock and Look + feature allows you to lock in a low mortgage financing rate for 90 days while you search for the perfect place to call home.

Monthly Payments for a $450,000 Mortgage

The amount you pay each month for a $450,000 mortgage payment is going to be somewhere between $2,993 and $4,044. However, keep in mind that there are a few variables that affect your monthly payment. These include:

•   Interest rate

•   Fixed or variable interest rate

•   Length of repayment period (15, 20, or 30 years)

•   Mortgage insurance

•   Property taxes

•   Property insurance

Another thing to consider are homeowners association (HOA) fees. Although they are paid directly to the HOA association and shouldn’t affect your monthly mortgage payment, these fees are an additional living expense.

If you’re a first-time homebuyer, it’s important to understand the true cost of owning a home because your monthly payment is more complicated than simply the amount you borrow. Housing costs and property taxes, for example, vary based on location. If you’re open to where you live, you may want to compare the cost of living by state. The best affordable places to live in the U.S. may pique your interest!

First-time homebuyers can
prequalify for a SoFi mortgage loan,
with as little as 3% down.


Where to Get a $450,000 Mortgage

Banks, credit unions, and online lenders can all provide you with a $450,000 mortgage. Make sure you shop around and compare lenders to get the lowest interest rate. As you apply, you’ll receive loan estimates that show the cost of a loan. While the annual percentage rate (APR) is certainly important, also compare expenses such as the loan origination fee and mortgage insurance.

What to Consider Before Applying for a $450,000 Mortgage

Before applying for a $450,000 mortgage, consider the cost difference between a shorter loan repayment period and a longer loan repayment period. For a 30-year mortgage with a 7% interest rate, the total interest paid during the life of the loan would be $627,791.

For a 15-year mortgage with the same interest rate, you would have a higher monthly payment, but the total amount you would pay in interest would be more than halved: just $278,050. For an extra $1,050 each month, a 15-year loan would save $349,739 in interest compared to a 30-year loan.

If you can’t afford a 15-year mortgage now, just remember that you can always do a mortgage refinance in the future.

$450,000 mortgage with a term of 30 years and a 7% interest rate:

Year Beginning Balance Monthly Payment Total Interest Paid Total Principal Paid Remaining Balance
1 $450,000 $2,993.86 $31,355.19 $4,571.14 $445,428.86
2 $445,428.86 $2,993.86 $31,024.74 $4,901.59 $440,527.26
3 $440,527.26 $2,993.86 $30,670.41 $5,255.93 $435,271.33
4 $435,271.33 $2,993.86 $30,290.45 $5,635.88 $429,635.45
5 $429,635.45 $2,993.86 $29,883.04 $6,043.30 $423,592.15
6 $423,592.15 $2,993.86 $29,446.17 $6,480.17 $417,111.98
7 $417,111.98 $2,993.86 $28,977.71 $6,948.62 $410,163.36
8 $410,163.36 $2,993.86 $28,475.40 $7,450.94 $402,712.43
9 $402,712.43 $2,993.86 $27,936.77 $7,989.57 $394,722.86
10 $394,722.86 $2,993.86 $27,359.20 $8,567.13 $386,155.73
11 $386,155.73 $2,993.86 $26,739.88 $9,186.45 $376,969.27
12 $376,969.27 $2,993.86 $26,075.79 $9,850.54 $367,118.73
13 $367,118.73 $2,993.86 $25,363.70 $10,562.64 $356,556.09
14 $356,556.09 $2,993.86 $24,600.12 $11,326.21 $345,229.88
15 $345,229.88 $2,993.86 $23,781.35 $12,144.98 $333,084.90
16 $333,084.90 $2,993.86 $22,903.39 $13,022.95 $320,061.95
17 $320,061.95 $2,993.86 $21,961.96 $13,964.38 $306,097.58
18 $306,097.58 $2,993.86 $20,952.47 $14,973.86 $291,123.71
19 $291,123.71 $2,993.86 $19,870.01 $16,056.32 $275,067.39
20 $275,067.39 $2,993.86 $18,709.30 $17,217.04 $257,850.35
21 $257,850.35 $2,993.86 $17,464.68 $18,461.66 $239,388.69
22 $239,388.69 $2,993.86 $16,130.08 $19,796.25 $219,592.44
23 $219,592.44 $2,993.86 $14,699.01 $21,227.33 $198,365.12
24 $198,365.12 $2,993.86 $13,164.48 $22,761.85 $175,603.27
25 $175,603.27 $2,993.86 $11,519.03 $24,407.31 $151,195.96
26 $151,195.96 $2,993.86 $9,754.62 $26,171.71 $125,024.25
27 $125,024.25 $2,993.86 $7,862.67 $28,063.67 $96,960.58
28 $96,960.58 $2,993.86 $5,833.94 $30,092.39 $66,868.19
29 $66,868.19 $2,993.86 $3,658.56 $32,267.77 $34,600.41
30 $34,600.41 $2,993.86 $1,325.92 $34,600.41 $0

$450,000 mortgage with a term of 15 years and 7% interest rate:

Year Beginning Balance Monthly Payment Total Interest Paid Total Principal Paid Remaining Balance
1 $450,000 $4,044.73 $30,942.64 $17,594.09 $432,405.91
2 $432,405.91 $4,044.73 $29,670.76 $18,865.97 $413,539.94
3 $413,539.94 $4,044.73 $28,306.94 $20,229.79 $393,310.15
4 $393,310.15 $4,044.73 $26,844.52 $21,692.20 $371,617.94
5 $371,617.94 $4,044.73 $25,276.39 $23,260.34 $348,357.61
6 $348,357.61 $4,044.73 $23,594.90 $24,941.83 $323,415.78
7 $323,415.78 $4,044.73 $21,791.85 $26,744.87 $296,670.91
8 $296,670.91 $4,044.73 $19,858.46 $28,678.26 $267,992.64
9 $267,992.64 $4,044.73 $17,785.31 $30,751.42 $237,241.23
10 $237,241.23 $4,044.73 $15,562.29 $32,974.44 $204,266.79
11 $204,266.79 $4,044.73 $13,178.56 $35,358.16 $168,908.62
12 $168,908.62 $4,044.73 $10,622.52 $37,914.21 $130,994.41
13 $130,994.41 $4,044.73 $7,881.70 $40,655.03 $76,144.79
14 $76,144.79 $4,044.73 $4,942.74 $43,593.99 $31,524.68
15 $31,524.68 $4,044.73 $1,791.33 $46,745.40 $0

It’s important to understand how costs vary between the different types of mortgage loans. A mortgage calculator can help you get a quick idea of what to expect before you commit to a home mortgage loan.

How to Get a $450,000 Mortgage

To get a $450,000 mortgage, you need a strong credit score, a steady source of income, and a low debt-to-income ratio. Other tips to qualify for a mortgage include things like saving up for a higher down payment and submitting all of the appropriate paperwork to your lender in a timely manner. If you’re just starting out on your home buying journey, a home loan help center may be a good resource.


💡 Quick Tip: Generally, the lower your debt-to-income ratio, the better loan terms you’ll be offered. One way to improve your ratio is to increase your income (hello, side hustle!). Another way is to consolidate your debt and lower your monthly debt payments.

The Takeaway

Payment on a $450,000 mortgage is influenced by a few different variables, such as your loan term and interest rate. Other factors that come into play include mortgage insurance, property taxes, and property insurance. A higher down payment and a stronger credit score may help lower your monthly payment.

Looking for an affordable option for a home mortgage loan? SoFi can help: We offer low down payments (as little as 3% - 5%*) with our competitive and flexible home mortgage loans. Plus, applying is extra convenient: It's online, with access to one-on-one help.

SoFi Mortgages: simple, smart, and so affordable.

FAQ

How much is $450K mortgage a month?

A $450,000 mortgage should cost you around $3,000 to $4,000. Just remember to also include property taxes and insurance in your calculations.

How much income is required for $450,000 mortgage?

You probably need to earn around $140,000 a year to afford a $450,000 mortgage. A general guideline is that all of your housing costs should be at or below 30% of your gross income. Assuming you opt for a 30-year loan, your mortgage payment, property tax, and insurance cost would total around $3,200 per month. Factor in a budget for utilities and repairs and your total annual cost would be $42,000 — that’s 30% of $140,000.

How much is a down payment on a $450,000 mortgage?

A conventional loan requires a down payment of at least 3%. Therefore, your down payment should be, at minimum, $13,500. A down payment of 20% ($113,000 on a property costing $563,000) would allow you to skip paying the additional cost of mortgage insurance.

Can I afford a $450K house with a $70K salary?

It’s not likely. Assuming you choose a 30-year loan, your monthly payment would be around $3,000, which would be more than 50% of your gross income — well over the 30% that is considered the maximum amount you should spend on housing. The only way to make it work would be to have a large down payment (more than $150,000) to lower the amount you would have to borrow and thus your monthly payments.


Photo credit: iStock/AntonioGuillem

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


SoFi Mortgages
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. Not all products are available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.


*SoFi requires Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) for conforming home loans with a loan-to-value (LTV) ratio greater than 80%. As little as 3% down payments are for qualifying first-time homebuyers only. 5% minimum applies to other borrowers. Other loan types may require different fees or insurance (e.g., VA funding fee, FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums, etc.). Loan requirements may vary depending on your down payment amount, and minimum down payment varies by loan type.

+Lock and Look program: Terms and conditions apply. Applies to conventional purchase loans only. Rate will lock for 91 calendar days at the time of preapproval. An executed purchase contract is required within 60 days of your initial rate lock. If current market pricing improves by 0.25 percentage points or more from the original locked rate, you may request your loan officer to review your loan application to determine if you qualify for a one-time float down. SoFi reserves the right to change or terminate this offer at any time with or without notice to you.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

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Throwing a Gender Reveal Party on a Budget

6 Cheap Gender Reveal Ideas for Those on a Tight Budget

Congratulations! If you’re reading this, it probably means you or someone you care about is starting a family (or adding to one). One popular way to celebrate is with a gender reveal party: It’s a fun way to get all the expectant parents’ loved ones involved before the new addition arrives.

But gender reveal parties, like any kind of get-together, can quickly get expensive. Renting a space, ordering flowers and decorations, and wrangling the menu can add up. Which can be an issue, especially if the couple that is expecting or the person hosting is trying to also save for, say, the baby’s nursery or a baby shower.

So read on for six gender reveal party ideas that will be a fun way to share the news without breaking the bank.

Cheap Gender Reveal Ideas

When ​​saving for a baby, it’s vital to protect your finances, even during celebrations. Sure, you want to share the excitement in a stylish way, but there are cribs, strollers, and lots of diapers to be bought! To help you pull off a gender reveal on a budget, read on.

💡 Quick Tip: Make money easy. Enjoy the convenience of managing bills, deposits, and transfers from one online bank account with SoFi.

1. Keep It Small

You can save money by downsizing your event. Instead of inviting anyone and everyone, try including just friends and family. Not only will a smaller party keep costs low, but it will make the event more personal and a whole lot less frantic. An intimate gathering with those closest to you can be a lovely way to celebrate learning a baby’s gender. Plus, it allows the host or guest of honor to get more quality time with each invitee.

However, you may want to run this by the expectant mother if you are organizing the party on her behalf. She should have the last say about the invite list so that no one significant gets missed.

2. Choose a Cheap or Free Venue

You can hold a gender reveal party anywhere. When you think about it, it’s a very accommodating event without a lot of rules about the dress code, timing, or the activities involved. So, you can likely make any location work, whether it’s at home, a local restaurant, or elsewhere.

•   Be creative with the location. Instead of a full (pricey) restaurant meal, could you host a party at a local coffee bar (some host events)? Or could you do an afternoon tea at a favorite eatery, before they open for dinner? These kinds of options can help you save a considerable amount of money.

•   When picking where to have the party, you may need to factor in the size of your guest list and the type of gender reveal you want. For example, if you plan to use a gender-reveal powder cannon, you probably need a venue outdoors.

•   Rented venues can be expensive, so for a gender reveal on a budget, consider hosting at home.

•   Look at other cheap locations like a nearby green space. Many gender reveal parties are happily hosted in a local park. You bring cushions, a picnic blanket, and all the trimmings, and you’re set, without the cost of renting.

3. Send Digital Invites

Invitations are where many people let their creativity shine. But physically mailing them out may not be the most cost-effective option; you’ll have to buy the cards and spend money on postage, too. If you are looking for a way to send fun invites but for a fraction of the price and time, consider digital versions.

•   There are apps and websites that offer digital invite services. You can find a wide range of gender-reveal invitation templates on them. Spend a few minutes scrolling; you may find some totally free options, or you might spend anywhere from $10 to $20 on them. You can also find fun graphics and animations to make them unique.

•   These resources make planning a party more straightforward for the host. That’s because they usually come with a function that lets guests RSVP digitally, so you can keep track of who is coming. You can also usually automate updates and reminders.

•   Where to start? Try exploring Punchbowl, Evite, and Paperless Post for some great evite options.

4. Make Your Own Decorations

Similar to birthday parties, a gender reveal party isn’t complete without a few decorations. Here are some ways to keep costs down:

•   Easy DIY décor can include banners, streamers, candles, and table centerpieces. Often, you only need cardstock, ribbon, and paper to get creative. You might also be able to find printable images online. Sayings like “Whether pink or blue, we love you” and the like can be a fun way to underscore the reason everyone has gathered.

•   Use what you already have — outside. Anyone with a green thumb can take advantage of their garden to liven up their party. You can set the whole event up outdoors if the weather is nice or use flowers to decorate your home. For example, fresh flowers in mason jars or dollar-store vases are a simple but effective centerpiece.

•   A quick reminder: Even if the parents know the gender already, decorations shouldn’t give it away. Instead, aim for a gender-neutral look or a mix of pinks and blues so that nothing spoils the surprise.

5. Do a Potluck

Hosting a gender reveal party that includes a meal can get very pricey, very fast. No matter the size of your guest’s appetite, you have to purchase food per head. Some recommend around a half-pound of meat and half a bottle of wine for each person at an event. That alone could rack up a bill equal to a few months’ worth of baby supplies.

Instead, consider a potluck.

•   A potluck can save you significant costs in the food department.

•   It’s a great way to bond as a community or family. Everyone plays a role. You may find that having a number of people contributing makes the endeavor more creative.

•   Hosting a potluck does take a bit of organization to make sure, say, that not everyone brings a dessert, but the savings and sense of teamwork may be well worth it.

6. Opt for These Ways to Do the Reveal

The most important part of a gender reveal party is the reveal itself. But, you don’t have to pay for expensive fireworks, a band, or an entire room of balloons to make a statement. Some budget-friendly ideas include:

•   Gender reveal confetti or powder cannons

•   A giant balloon filled with colored confetti; pop it to reveal the gender

•   Cupcakes or cake with the gender color inside

•   A pinata filled with either pink or blue ribbons and glitter

You can also set the stage with color-themed food and drink. Some hosts like to have pitchers of fun fruit drinks, one tinted pink and the other blue with berries.

Recommended: A Guide to Using Savings Clubs

Setting Your Gender Reveal Party Budget

Your budget will obviously vary with the type of party you are planning. If you have a backyard potluck for 10 close friends it will, of course, be much more affordable than a meal for a few dozen guests at a rented space.

For example, let’s say you choose a large venue; that alone may cost you upwards of $200 to rent. In addition, decorating the location may be expensive, anywhere from $50 to $100 and up. That’s because there is more space to cover than your garden or living room. Plus you’ll need to factor in the food as well. Ka-ching! And double ka-ching if you live in a major city; your costs are likely to be higher.

That said, only you and your loved ones know what will be the right way to celebrate the upcoming birth. Just like putting together a budget for a baby, be methodical.

Budget Beforehand

Sit down early in the planning process and create a budget for your party. If there is more than one host, pool your resources and determine the total you can spend. It’s essential to do this before you start party planning.

•   Go line by line, item by item. Write down what you need and estimate the cost. That way, you know exactly what you need to buy and how much it will cost. Otherwise, there’s every chance that you’ll discover your cheap gender reveal party wound up being a high-cost celebration.

•   Understand where the funds are coming from. Is the expectant couple or individual footing the bill? If you are organizing, who else might contribute? Sometimes family members of the parents-to-be are also willing to help. They may contribute some cash or offer to bring items to the event.

Stick to Your Budget

It sounds self-explanatory: Stick to the budget you make. However, any party planner knows that it’s easier said than done, whether you have a baby shower, birthday, or anniversary on your hands.

•   Hold yourself and the team that’s organizing the event accountable. It’s very easy to dip a little further into your funds for extra decorations, more flowers, or a beautifully decorated dessert. While those gestures are nice, they come at a financial cost. You may need to separate your “party fund” from your savings account. Or, if you have a co-host, report your spending to each other. You’ll be less inclined to go overboard that way.

•   Play around with your distribution of funds. For instance, maybe you have a baker in the family who can bake a fab gender reveal cake. In that case, you can put more money toward a venue. Or, perhaps you are hosting a potluck version of a gender reveal party. That frees up some cash for decorations or how you handle the big reveal.

It’s a balancing act, for sure, but with a little planning and a strong commitment to your budget, you can host a gender reveal party that won’t leave you with debt to pay off.

Recommended: Budgeting for Beginners

The Takeaway

Hosting a gender reveal on a budget may take a bit of extra planning. But spending less won’t make the event any less memorable. Instead, think of it as an opportunity to test your creative muscles and come together as loved ones. Play around with your budget to find the best party plan. Maybe you host it at a restaurant but it’s a tea party instead of a full meal. Or perhaps you gather in someone’s yard or a local park and then have enough to splurge on an amazing cake. It’s all about balance.

Whether you’re expecting a baby or simply planning a party for one of your besties, life is expensive. That’s why finding a banking partner that offers competitive interest rates and low (or no fees) can be important.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.

Better banking is here with up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

What is a good budget for a gender reveal party?

Budgets will vary depending on the host’s means and goals and the expectant parents’ desires. However, you can stretch a fund further with a more relaxed event. For example, a small barbecue in your backyard with a few friends won’t cost as much as a luxe rented location but may make up for that with the warm, intimate vibe.

Who usually throws a gender reveal party?

There is no norm; anyone can throw a gender reveal party, from a close family member to the parents to a best friend. It’s all good! In some cases, there are even multiple hosts. This allows everyone to take on a smaller financial burden than a singular host. The only rule is to keep the gender a secret during planning.

How much should a gender reveal cake cost?

The cost of gender reveal cake can vary in price depending on where you buy it, how big it is, and how ornate it is. Prices often land in the range of $25 to $50. However, features like surprise candy inside will likely run you more money. And if you purchase a cake from a highly rated patisserie in a big city it will probably be considerably more expensive than one at a local bakery in the suburbs.


Photo credit: iStock/Ievgeniia Shugaliia

SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
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SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a deposit to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

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How Much a $200,000 Mortgage Will Cost You

A $200,000 mortgage might cost you more than twice that amount over the course of the loan’s lifetime. That’s thanks in part to the way banks amortize, or parse out the balance of interest to principal in each payment. Of course, how much your specific $200,000 mortgage will cost is a more complicated equation, since personal financial factors like your credit score and debt level will affect your interest rate. And your interest rate, in turn, will affect your total mortgage cost.

Read on for a peek into the mortgage payment on $200K, including sample amortization tables, how much your monthly payment might cost, where to find a loan, and more.

Here’s What a $200,000 Mortgage Costs

When you take out a loan of any kind, the lending institution — often a bank — charges you for the service of giving you the money you need up front. When you repay a loan, you’re repaying both principal (the money you borrowed) and interest (the money the loan servicer is charging you).

Interest is expressed as a rate in the form of a percentage. Higher interest means you’re paying more for the loan — and lower interest, of course, means you’ll pay less. The lowest interest rates are reserved for buyers with the best financial profiles, which may include factors like robust and steady income, a good or excellent credit score, and a low level of existing debt (another factor lenders express in the form of a percentage: DTI, or your debt-to-income ratio).

With all that said, let’s say you take out a $200,000 mortgage to pay for a house that costs $275,000. In this example, you’d have made a down payment of $75,000, or just over 27%. Over the course of a 30-year mortgage term, with a fixed interest rate of 6%, you’d pay almost $232,000 in interest — along with the principal repayment, of course, bringing your total amount paid to almost $432,000. You’ll notice that figure is more than double the original $200,000 you borrowed, and this example doesn’t even include additional fees like property tax or homeowners insurance.

However, interest rates are very powerful here, and even a small decrease in interest can have a big effect on the overall loan cost. For example, imagine everything we’ve just described above remains the same, but your interest rate is 4% rather than 6%. In that scenario, your total interest would be about $143,000, representing a savings of around $90,000. (Insert shocked emoji.)

As you can see, finding the most favorable interest rates possible is really worthwhile for homebuyers. If this is your first time in the home market, a home loan help center can educate you about the buying process.


💡 Quick Tip: You deserve a more zen mortgage. Look for a mortgage lender who’s dedicated to closing your loan on time.

First-time homebuyers can
prequalify for a SoFi mortgage loan,
with as little as 3% down.


How Much Are Monthly Payments for a $200,000 Mortgage?

Maybe you’re less concerned about how much your $200,000 mortgage will cost you over the long term but are curious about the monthly payment on a $200K mortgage. Again, interest rates have a big effect on monthly mortgage payments, as does the loan’s term (how long you have to repay it). Still, we can offer a few examples.

For a 30-year $200,000 mortgage at a fixed interest rate of 7%, your monthly payments would be about $1,330 (though this figure doesn’t include property taxes or homeowners insurance, which could push your payment hundreds of dollars upward).

For a 15-year $200,000 mortgage with the same interest rate, your monthly payments would be about $1,797 (again, without additional costs included).

You can get more specific figures customized to your circumstances using a mortgage calculator or home affordability calculator online.

Where You Can Get a $200,000 Mortgage

There are ways to get a $200,000 mortgage if you’re sure you’re ready for one. Private banks, credit unions, and lenders who specialize in mortgages are all available to meet your request. You can usually do most of the application online.

One caveat: As we’ve seen above, interest rates can make a huge difference when it comes to the cost of your mortgage over time. Although market factors have a big influence on interest rates, your personal markers also matter, so getting your financial ducks in a row as possible before applying could help you save money in the long run. (So can finding an affordable place to live in the first place.) Additionally, you may want to ask for prequalification quotes from a variety of lenders to see who can give you the best deal.

Recommended: Tips to Qualify for a Mortgage

What to Consider Before Getting a $200,000 Mortgage: Amortization

Remember how we were talking about amortization above? In most cases, lenders amortize loans in such a way that, toward the beginning of the loan, the bulk of your payments are going toward interest. (Although your fixed monthly payments never change, the proportion of how much of that amount goes toward interest versus principal can.)

To understand how this can impact your ability to build equity, we’ve included the following sample amortization schedules for two different types of mortgage loans below. As you’ll see, the remaining principal balance goes down far more slowly than the amount you pay in. For example, in the chart below, although you’d pay a total of almost $16,000 toward your mortgage, the principal only reduces by about $2,000 because nearly $14,000 of your payments go toward interest.

Amortization Schedule, 30-year, 7% Fixed

Years Since Purchase Beginning Balance Monthly Payment Total Interest Paid Total Principal Paid Remaining Balance
1 $200,000 $1,330.60 $13,935.64 $2,031.62 $197,968.38
3 $195,789.89 $1,330.60 $13,631.29 $2,335.97 $193,453.93
5 $190,949.09 $1,330.60 $13,281.35 $2,685.91 $188,263.18
10 $175,432.38 $1,330.60 $12,159.65 $3,807.61 $171,624.77
15 $153,435.50 $1,330.60 $10,933.39 $5,033.87 $153,435.50
20 $129,388.32 $1,330.60 $8,831.12 $7,136.14 $122,252.17
30 $15,377.96 $1,330.60 $589.30 $15,377.96 $0.00

As you can see, even 20 years into the loan’s 30-year lifespan, you’ll still be paying more toward interest than principal (though the proportion will be much closer to 50/50 than at the beginning of the term).

Next, let’s look at what happens when the home mortgage loan term is reduced to 15 years.

Amortization Schedule, 15-year, 7% Fixed

Years Since Purchase Beginning Balance Monthly Payment Total Interest Paid Total Principal Paid Remaining Balance
1 $200,000 $1,797.66 $13,752.28 $7,819.60 $192,180.40
3 $183,795.53 $1,797.66 $12,580.86 $8,991.02 $174,804.51
5 $165,163.53 $1,797.66 $11,233.95 $10,337.93 $154,825.60
7 $143,740.35 $1,797.66 $9,685.27 $11,886.61 $131,853.74
10 $105,440.55 $1,797.66 $6,916.57 $14,655.31 $90,785.24
12 $75,070.50 $1,797.66 $4,721.12 $16,850.76 $58,219.74
15 $20,775.73 $1,797.66 $796.15 $20,775.73 $0.00

As this chart shows, a mortgage loan with a shorter term can help you build equity more quickly: Notice how principal and interest payments are much closer to equal just five years in, or a third of the way through the loan. Keep in mind that this ability comes at the cost of a higher monthly payment, though, so it may not be possible for all — especially first-time homebuyers who may struggle to meet higher mortgage payments.


💡 Quick Tip: If you refinance your mortgage and shorten your loan term, you could save a substantial amount in interest over the lifetime of the loan.

How Do I Get a $200,000 Mortgage?

Taking out a $200,000 mortgage is a fairly simple process these days. In most cases, your lender can pre-qualify you online or over the phone. While applying for your official approval will take a few more steps, including providing documentation like income verification and tax returns, you can still be approved in as little as a business day—and ready to take over the keys to your dream home.

To get started, reach out to the lender you’ve chosen to learn more about their process. They may make it simple to start your application online. Just don’t forget that interest adds up, and amortization can make it more difficult to build equity quickly. It’s worth checking in to ensure your lender doesn’t charge an early repayment penalty, and that they make it simple to pay additional principal if you’re able.

Recommended: The Cost of Living By State

The Takeaway

Because of interest, a $200,000 mortgage might cost more than $200,000 on top of the principal you borrow. It all depends on your loan term as well as your specific rate — which in turn depends on your financial standing.

Looking for an affordable option for a home mortgage loan? SoFi can help: We offer low down payments (as little as 3% - 5%*) with our competitive and flexible home mortgage loans. Plus, applying is extra convenient: It's online, with access to one-on-one help.

SoFi Mortgages: simple, smart, and so affordable.

FAQ

How much does a $200K mortgage cost each month?

With a fixed rate of 7%, a 30-year $200,000 mortgage will cost about $1,330 per month before additional fees, and a 15-year $200,000 mortgage at the same rate will cost closer to $1,800. If your down payment is less than 20% you will likely have to pay for mortgage insurance as well, not to mention property taxes and insurance.

How much income is required to qualify for a $200,000 mortgage?

An income of around $65,000 is in the right ballpark to qualify for a $200,000 mortgage. Income is far from the only important factor lenders consider when qualifying you for a loan, however, and even those who make substantial income may not qualify if they have high levels of debt or other negative factors.

How much is the down payment for a $200,000 mortgage?

Down payment amounts can vary substantially. Some loans allow you to put down as little as 3.5%, which, for a $200,000 home would be $7,000. To avoid having to pay for mortgage insurance, you’d want to put down at least 20%, which is $40,000.

Can I afford a $200K house with a salary of $70K?

What you can and can’t afford is a complex calculation that depends on your lifestyle, where you live, and more. That said, $70,000 is within the feasible range to take out a $200,000 mortgage, particularly if you choose a longer loan term.


Photo credit: iStock/skynesher

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


SoFi Mortgages
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. Not all products are available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.


*SoFi requires Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) for conforming home loans with a loan-to-value (LTV) ratio greater than 80%. As little as 3% down payments are for qualifying first-time homebuyers only. 5% minimum applies to other borrowers. Other loan types may require different fees or insurance (e.g., VA funding fee, FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums, etc.). Loan requirements may vary depending on your down payment amount, and minimum down payment varies by loan type.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

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How Much Will a $150,000 Mortgage Cost?

A $150,000 mortgage will cost a total of $341,318 over the lifetime of the loan, assuming an interest rate of 6.5% and a 30-year term. It might be tempting to think that a $150,000 mortgage will cost…well, $150,000. But lenders need to earn a living for their services and mortgage loans come with interest.

What’s the True Cost of a $150,000 Mortgage?

The specific price you will pay to borrow $150,000 depends on your interest rate — which, in turn, is based on a wide range of factors including your credit score, income stability, and much more. Here’s what you need to know to get an estimate of how much a $150,000 home mortgage loan might cost in your specific circumstances.


💡 Quick Tip: If you refinance your mortgage and shorten your loan term, you could save a substantial amount in interest over the lifetime of the loan.

First-time homebuyers can
prequalify for a SoFi mortgage loan,
with as little as 3% down.


Where Do You Get a $150,000 Mortgage?

Good news: There are many banks and institutions that offer $150,000 mortgages. For 2024, the maximum amount for most conventional loans is more than $750,000, so the loan you’re considering is well within reach. To see how your salary, debts, and down payment savings affect how much home you can afford, use a home affordability calculator.

However, it’s important to understand that even a $150,000 mortgage may cost far more than the sticker price after interest and associated fees. For instance, let’s say you purchase a $200,000 home with a 25% down payment and a $150,000 mortgage. If your interest rate is 7% and your loan term is 30 years, the total amount you’d pay over that time is $359,263.35 — which means you’d actually pay more than the home price ($209,263.35) in interest alone. (And that’s before closing costs, home insurance, property taxes, or mortgage insurance.)

At prices like that, it may seem like taking out a mortgage at all is a bad deal. Fortunately, property has a tendency to increase in value (or appreciate) over time, which helps offset the overall cost of interest. (Of course, nothing is guaranteed.)

Keep in mind that you can potentially lower the interest rate you qualify for by lowering your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio, improving your credit score, or increasing your cash flow by getting a better-paying job. Even a small decrease in interest can have a big effect over the lifetime of a loan. In our example above, with all else being equal, you’d pay only $139,883.68 in interest if your rate were 5% instead of 7% — a savings of nearly $70,000!

Recommended: The Best Affordable Places to Live in the U.S.

Monthly Payments for a $150,000 Mortgage

When you take out a $150,000 mortgage, you’ll repay it over time in monthly installments — of a fixed amount, if you have a fixed mortgage, or amounts that can change if you take out a variable rate loan.

Your monthly $150K mortgage payment includes both principal (the amount you borrowed) and interest (the amount you’re being charged), and may also wrap in your property taxes, homeowners insurance, and mortgage insurance if applicable. (You’ll only need to pay mortgage insurance if your down payment is less than 20%.)

But there is another caveat here that some first-time homebuyers don’t know about. Even if your mortgage payments are fixed each month, the proportion of how much principal you’re paying to how much interest you’re paying does change over time — a process known as the amortization of the loan. It’s a big word, but its bottom line is simple: Earlier on in the loan’s life, you’re likely paying more interest than principal, which increases the amount of money the bank earns overall. Later on in the loan, you’ll usually pay more principal than interest.

What to Consider Before Applying for a $150,000 Mortgage

Amortization is important to understand because it can affect your future financial decisions. For example, if you’re not planning on staying in your house for many years, you may find you have less equity in your home than you originally imagined by the time you’re ready to sell — because the bulk of your mortgage payments thus far have been going toward interest. It might also affect when it makes sense to refinance your mortgage.

Most lenders make it easy to make larger payments or additional payments against the principal you owe so that you can chip away at your debt total faster, but be sure to double-check that your lender doesn’t have early repayment penalties.

Of course, there are different types of home loans. Here are some sample amortization schedules for two $150,000 home loans. (You can also build your own based on your specific details with a mortgage calculator or an amortization calculator online.)

Amortization Schedule, 30-year, 7% Fixed

Years Since Purchase Beginning Balance Monthly Payment Total Interest Paid Total Principal Paid Remaining Balance
1 $150,000 $997.95 $10,451.73 $1,523.71 $148,476.29
3 $146,842.42 $997.95 $10,223.47 $1,751.98 $145,090.44
5 $143,211.82 $997.95 $9,961.01 $2,014.43 $141,197.38
10 $131,574.29 $997.95 $9,119.73 $2,855.71 $128,718.58
15 $115,076.63 $997.95 $7,927.12 $4,048.33 $111,028.30
20 $91,689.13 $997.95 $6,236.43 $5,739.01 $85,950.12
30 $11,533.47 $997.95 $441.97 $11,975.44 $0.00

Notice that, for more than the first half of the loan’s lifetime, you’ll pay substantially more interest than principal each year — even though your mortgage payments remain fixed in amount.

Amortization Schedule, 15-year, 7% Fixed

Years Since Purchase Beginning Balance Monthly Payment Total Interest Paid Total Principal Paid Remaining Balance
1 $150,000 $1,348.24 $10,314.21 $5,864.70 $144,135.30
3 $137,846.65 $1,348.24 $9,435.65 $6,743.26 $131,103.38
5 $123,872.65 $1,348.24 $8,425.46 $7,753.45 $116,119.20
7 $107,805.26 $1,348.24 $7,263.95 $8,914.96 $98,890.30
10 $79,080.41 $1,348.24 $5,187.43 $10,991.48 $68,088.93
12 $56,302.87 $1,348.24 $3,540.84 $12,638.07 $43,664.80
15 $15,581.80 $1,348.24 $597.11 $15,581.80 $0.00

While a shorter loan term may help you build equity in your home more quickly, it comes at the cost of a higher monthly payment.

How to Get a $150,000 Mortgage

To apply for a $150,000 mortgage, you can search for providers online or go into a local brick-and-mortar bank or credit union you trust. You’ll need to provide a variety of information to qualify for the loan, including your employment history, income level, credit score, debt level, and more.

The higher your credit score, lower your debt, and more robust your cash flow, the more likely you are to qualify for a $150,000 mortgage — and, ideally, one at the lowest possible interest rate. That said, mortgage interest rates are also subject to market influences and fluctuations, and sometimes rates are simply higher than others overall.


💡 Quick Tip: To see a house in person, particularly in a tight or expensive market, you may need to show the real estate agent proof that you’re preapproved for a mortgage. SoFi’s online application makes the process simple.

The Takeaway

A $150,000 mortgage can actually cost far more than $150,000. Depending on your interest rate and your loan term, you may spend more than you borrowed in principal in the first place on interest, and you’ll likely pay a higher proportional amount of interest per monthly payment for about the first half of your loan’s lifetime.

Looking for an affordable option for a home mortgage loan? SoFi can help: We offer low down payments (as little as 3% - 5%*) with our competitive and flexible home mortgage loans. Plus, applying is extra convenient: It's online, with access to one-on-one help.

SoFi Mortgages: simple, smart, and so affordable.

FAQ

How much is $150K mortgage a month?

A 30-year, $150,000 mortgage at a 7% fixed interest rate will be about $998 per month (not including property taxes or mortgage interest), while a 15-year mortgage at the same rate would cost about $1,348 monthly. The exact monthly payment you owe on a $150,000 mortgage will vary depending on factors like your interest rate and what other fees, like mortgage insurance, are rolled into the bill.

How much income is required for a $150,000 mortgage?

Those who earn about $55,000 or more per year may be more likely to qualify for a $150,000 mortgage than those who earn less. Although your income is an important marker for lenders, it’s far from the only one — and even people who earn a lot of money may not qualify for a mortgage if they have a high debt total or a poor credit score. (Still, the best way to learn whether or not you qualify is to ask your lender.)

How much is a downpayment on a $150,000 mortgage?

To avoid paying mortgage insurance, you’d want to put down 20% of the home’s purchase price, which if you are borrowing $150,000 would be $50,000 for a home priced at $200,000. Some lenders allow you to put down as little as 3.5% of the home’s price. So if you had a $150,000 mortgage and put down 3.5%, your down payment would be $5,440 and the home price would be $155,440. (Keep in mind these figures do not include closing costs.)

Can I afford a $150K house with $70K salary?

Yes, as long as you don’t have a lot of other debt, you can probably afford a $150,000 home if you’re making $70,000 a year. There’s a basic rule of thumb to spend less than a third of your gross income on your housing. With an income of $70,000 per year, you’re making about $5,833.33 per month before taxes — and a third of that figure is $1,925. A $150,000 mortgage might have a monthly payment of as little as $998 per month, even with a 7% interest rate, so it should be affordable for you as long as you don’t have other substantial debts.


SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


SoFi Mortgages
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. Not all products are available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.


*SoFi requires Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) for conforming home loans with a loan-to-value (LTV) ratio greater than 80%. As little as 3% down payments are for qualifying first-time homebuyers only. 5% minimum applies to other borrowers. Other loan types may require different fees or insurance (e.g., VA funding fee, FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums, etc.). Loan requirements may vary depending on your down payment amount, and minimum down payment varies by loan type.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

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Tax Credits vs Tax Deductions: What’s the Difference?

Tax credits and tax deductions work differently, with deductions lowering your taxable income and credits actually reducing the taxes you owe.

To be a little more specific, deductions can decrease the amount of income you have to pay taxes on, which can lower your final bill. Tax credits are a dollar-for-dollar reduction in what you owe — and might even get you a bigger tax refund.

It’s possible you may be able to claim both deductions and credits. Read on to understand more about how both options work.

What Are Tax Credits?

Tax credits represent a dollar-for-dollar reduction in your overall tax burden. They directly lower the tax amount you owe to Uncle Sam.

For example, if you owe $1,500 in taxes but qualify for a $500 tax credit, your total tax bill will decrease by $500, meaning you’ll only have to pay $1,000.

💡 Quick Tip: Help your money earn more money! Opening a bank account online often gets you higher-than-average rates.

How Do Tax Credits Work?

When filing your taxes, you can use IRS resources, tax software, or a certified accountant to research tax credits for which you may be eligible. If it’s your first time filing taxes, these resources can be especially helpful.

Even if you don’t owe anything in taxes, it’s worth looking into tax credits. Why? Because some tax credits are refundable, meaning the government might owe you money:

•   Refundable tax credits allow your tax liability to go below zero. For example, if you owe $100 in taxes but receive a $500 refundable tax credit, the government will actually owe you $400.

•   Nonrefundable tax credits do not work that way, unfortunately. If you qualify for a nonrefundable tax credit, the best it can do is eliminate your tax liability (meaning you owe nothing). But even if the credit is large enough to wipe out what you owe and there’s still money left over, you don’t get to pocket that extra money.

Tax credits are not for everyone. Each credit has specific requirements to qualify.

And if you’re wondering what happens if you miss the tax deadline, tax credits would still apply for the year that you’re filing your taxes.

Common Tax Credits

Your tax software or accountant should know the full list of tax credits to look out for, and the IRS website features the whole list. (You can also learn important information from an online tax help center.)

Before diving into your taxes, however, it’s a good idea to note some of the most common tax credits for which you may qualify:

•   Earned Income Tax Credit: Commonly called by its initials (EITC), this refundable tax credit is for low- to moderate-income workers. The amount you might qualify for and your eligibility can vary depending on whether you have dependents and/or have a disability.

•   American Opportunity Tax Credit: This education tax credit is partially refundable. Students (or parents claiming a student as a dependent) can claim this tax credit for the first four years of higher education. It’s $2,500 per eligible student, but once your tax bill hits zero, you can earn 40% of whatever remains (up to $1,000) as a tax refund.

•   Child Tax Credit: Even if a child isn’t enrolled in higher education, parents have access to a handy tax credit. The Child Tax Credit is a refundable tax credit for parents (with dependent children) who meet income requirements.

•   Child and Dependent Care Credit: Parents have access to yet another potential tax credit, this time for those who pay for babysitters or daycare. The credit amount depends on such factors as your income, child care costs, and number of children requiring care.

You can use tools on the IRS website to discover if you qualify for these and other tax credits.

What Are Tax Deductions?

Tax deductions are another way to reduce your tax burden, but they work differently. While a tax credit discounts your final tax bill after all the calculations, a tax deduction reduces the amount of income eligible for taxes.

The more deductions you have, the less money you have to pay taxes on. This can result in a lower overall tax bill, but it cannot result in a tax refund.

Recommended: What Triggers an IRS Audit?

How Do Tax Deductions Work?

Let’s look at an example to understand how tax deductions reduce what you owe:

If you made $100,000 in a given year, you would owe 24% in federal taxes based on your marginal tax bracket. But if you have $10,000 in tax deductions, you would lower your taxable income to $90,000, which puts you at both a lower base to calculate taxes ($90K vs. $100K), and you would be in the 22% tax bracket, which this year is capped at $95,375 for single filers.

As you can see, when calculating how much a tax deduction will save you, it’s important to know which tax bracket you’re in — your tax bracket represents the percentage at which your income could be taxed. In general, the more money you make, the higher the tax rate.

Common Tax Deductions

Nearly every tax filer is eligible for the standard deduction. Without inputting any information accounting for business expenses, medical costs, charitable contributions, student loan interest payments, and other eligible deductions, you can simply subtract the standard deduction amount from your taxable income.

For the 2023 tax year (which will be filed in April of 2024), the standard deduction is:

•   $13,850 for single taxpayers (and married, filing separately)

•   $27,700 for married taxpayers filing jointly

•   $20,800 for heads of household.

Many people choose to take the standard deduction, but if you qualify for various deductions that would amount to more than the standard deduction, it’s worth itemizing your deductions.

Working with a personal accountant or tax preparation software may be your best bet for determining which deductions you qualify for. Here are some of the most common types of deductions:

•   State and local taxes

•   Business expenses (if you are self-employed)

•   Mortgage interest

•   Property taxes

•   Qualifying medical expenses

•   Charitable contributions

•   Student loan interest.

You can explore even more tax deductions on the IRS website.

If you run your own business, it’s wise to look into common tax deductions for freelancers.

Pros and Cons of Tax Credits

Tax credits are largely a good thing, as they reduce your overall tax burden. But they also have some drawbacks. Here’s a closer look at the pros and cons:

Pros

First, consider these upsides of tax credits:

•   Reduces your tax bill

•   May result in a refund

•   Often designed for moderate- to low-income families.

Cons

Next, the potential downsides of tax credits:

•   Strict eligibility requirements

•   Can delay your refund when you claim them.

Recommended: How to File for a Tax Extension

Pros and Cons of Tax Deductions

Similarly, tax deductions serve a useful purpose in filing taxes, but they also have their own set of pros and cons.

Pros

Here are the potential advantages of tax deductions:

•   Reduces your tax bill

•   The standard deduction is easy to claim

•   Useful for self-employed individuals with business expenses.

Cons

Also be aware of the possible downsides:

•   Lots of paperwork (itemized deductions)

•   Weighing the standard vs. itemized deduction can be complicated

•   Won’t generate a refund.

Tax Credits vs Deductions: What’s the Difference?

Let’s break down the differences between tax credits and tax deductions in chart form:

Tax Credits Tax Deductions
Dollar-for-dollar reduction in your total tax bill Reduction in how much income you have to pay taxes on
Can result in a tax refund Can only reduce taxable income; cannot result in tax refund
Must claim specific credits for which you qualify Can take the standard deduction or itemize your deductions
Only available to filers who meet specific criteria Available to most filers as standard deduction

While nearly everyone can qualify for the standard deduction, tax credits can actually be the more effective way to lower your tax bill. But the best part? You can utilize both tax strategies when you file.

Tips for Using Tax Credits and Deductions

Preparing to file your taxes? Here are some tips for using tax credits and deductions:

•   Research eligibility requirements online: The IRS website has useful tools to help determine if you qualify for specific tax credits and deductions.

•   Gather all your paperwork: Taxes require a lot of forms, documents, and receipts. When claiming credits and deductions, it’s important to have the paperwork (whether printed or digital) to prove your eligibility.

•   Consider using tax software or an accountant: Taxes can be overwhelming. If your situation is complex (maybe you are confused by, say, your payroll deductions), you may benefit from tax software (TurboTax, H&R Block, and TaxSlayer are popular brands) or a tax professional.

The Takeaway

Tax credits and tax deductions can both lower your overall tax burden. Tax credits reduce what you owe dollar-for-dollar, while tax deductions reduce the amount of income you owe taxes on. If you’re eligible, you can take advantage of both tax strategies when you file.

While you are getting your taxes organized, don’t overlook the value of a banking partner that makes it easy to manage your finances.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.

Better banking is here with up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

Between a tax deduction and tax credit, which lowers your bill more?

A tax credit lowers your tax bill dollar-for-dollar and may even result in a refund. A tax deduction only reduces the amount of money you owe taxes on. For example, a $1,000 tax credit takes $1,000 off your tax bill. A $1,000 tax deduction reduces your taxable income by $1,000; the actual reduction in tax depends on your tax bracket.

Do more people utilize tax credits or tax deductions?

Most tax filers can claim the standard deduction, but not everyone qualifies for tax credits. So it is more likely that you’ll use a tax deduction on your tax return than a tax credit. That said, it is possible to use both credits and deductions to lower your tax bill.

Can I claim both deductions and tax credits?

Yes, you can claim both tax deductions and tax credits on your tax return, as long as you qualify for the deductions and credits you claim.


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SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a deposit to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.

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