How to Transfer Money From Your Credit Card to Your Bank Account

By Kelly Boyer Sagert · January 21, 2024 · 11 minute read

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How to Transfer Money From Your Credit Card to Your Bank Account

If you’re in need of cash, you might wonder if it’s possible to transfer money from a credit card to a bank account. The answer is yes, but it’s important to understand the costs and interest rates involved. You’ll also want to consider the potential impact on your credit score, and how you’ll pay the money back.

Read on to learn the nuts and bolts of how to transfer money from a credit card to bank account, the pros and cons of using your credit card to access cash, and a list of alternative options that may help you get the money you need.

How Do Transfers From a Credit Card to a Bank Account Work?

When you transfer money from a credit card to a bank account, it’s considered a cash advance. This means that instead of using your credit card to pay for a purchase, you’re tapping your credit line for a lump sum of cash. Once the money is transferred to the bank, you can spend it as you wish or transfer it to another bank account.

The amount of cash you can access through a cash advance can’t exceed the current available balance on the credit card. Often, you can only access up to your cash advance credit limit, which is typically significantly lower than the full credit limit on the card.

Unlike purchases you make with your credit card, interest on a cash advance starts accumulating right away — there’s no grace period for a cash advance. You may also be charged a cash advance fee for using the service. This might be a flat fee or it could be a certain percentage of the amount you transfer to your bank (often around 3% to 5% of the amount being transferred).

If you’re thinking about getting a credit card advance as a way of racking up cash back or travel points, you’ll want to think twice: Cash advances typically don’t qualify for credit card rewards.

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5 Ways to Transfer Money From a Credit Card to a Bank

If you’re wondering how to transfer money from a credit card to a bank account, you actually have a few different options. Here are some to consider.

Visit a Bank Branch

If you have a credit card issued by a bank, you can visit a local branch of that bank and ask a teller to withdraw funds from your credit card using the cash advance feature. If you have a checking or savings account at that same bank, the teller can deposit those funds into your account. If not, you may need to bring the withdrawn cash to the other bank to deposit the funds.

Use an ATM

You can get a cash advance at an ATM but you’ll need a PIN. If you’re not sure what your PIN is, you can call the number on the back of the card.

Once you have a PIN, you can make the transfer by inserting the card into the ATM, choosing the cash advance option, and entering the amount you want to withdraw. You’ll need to accept any associated fees, then complete the transaction. If you have a credit card and a bank account with the same bank, you may be able to have the cash deposited directly into your bank account. If not, cash will be dispensed and you’ll need to deposit the money into your account.

Transfer Money Online

If your credit card and bank account are with the same institution, you may be able to do the transfer online or through your bank’s mobile app. To do this, you simply need to sign into your account and select Transfer. Choose the credit card for Pay From and the bank account you want the money transferred to for Pay To. Finally, you’ll need to select the amount you want advanced and approve the cash advance. After a few minutes, you can check your bank account to make sure the money was transferred.

Use a Credit Card Convenience Check

If your credit card originally came with convenience checks, you can use one of those checks to transfer money from a credit card account to any type of bank account. If you don’t have checks, you may be able to order them.

To use a convenience check to transfer money from your credit card to your bank account, you simply write the check out to yourself and then deposit it in your bank account.

Keep in mind that these checks work in the same way as a cash advance at an ATM. Typically, they require paying the same cash advance fee and cash advance APR, and the grace period may not apply.

Redeem Cash Back Rewards

If you have a rewards credit card and you have racked up a good amount of points, you may be able to transfer them into your checking account as cash. This is not a cash advance and, as a result, doesn’t involve interest, fees, or the need to repay the sum. However, not all cash back credit cards allow this. And some credit cards only allow you to transfer rewards as cash to a bank account if the bank account is at the same bank that issued the credit card.

Pros and Cons of Transferring Money From Your Credit Card to Your Bank Account

There are advantages to using a credit card to transfer cash to a bank account but also some considerable downsides. Here’s a closer look.

Pros

•   Quick access to funds: Depending on the method you use, transferring money from your credit card to your bank account can take less than 30 minutes. You don’t need to spend time seeking a loan or awaiting approval.

•   Can be helpful in an emergency: If you’re in a temporary financial bind and don’t have an emergency fund, a transfer from your credit card to your bank account can be a reasonable solution, provided you’ll be able to repay the advance quickly.

•   Better option than a payday loan: Transferring money to your bank account via a credit card cash advance isn’t an ideal way to access credit, but can be preferable to a payday loan. Payday loans typically come with sky-high interest rates and fast (often two-week) repayment periods. If you can’t repay on time, you get hit with another round of fees, sinking you deeper into debt.

Cons

•   High interest rates: Cash advance interest rates are sometimes higher than credit card purchase APRs. Plus, interest starts accumulating as soon as you transfer the money. Unlike making purchases with your credit card, there is usually no grace period.

•   Additional fees: Cash advances also come with fees, which may be 3% to 5% of the amount you’re borrowing, adding to the total cost.

•   Potential damage to credit: Your credit scores typically won’t be impacted if you repay the money from the cash advance promptly. But cash advances can affect your credit utilization ratio, which is the amount of credit you’re using versus your total available credit. If the added balance of a cash advance goes unpaid for a while, it could hurt your credit.

•   There are more affordable ways to borrow money: Getting a personal loan, a home equity loan, or a home equity line of credit (HELOC) will typically cost less than a cash advance transfer from your credit card to your bank account.


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Alternative Ways to Transfer Money to Your Bank Account

Thanks to high interest rates and fees, a credit cash advance generally should not be your go-to for borrowing money. If you’re in need of extra cash, here are some other options to consider.

Personal Loan

A personal loan is a type of loan that allows flexible use, short- to moderate-term repayment options, and relatively quick funding. Available through banks, credit unions, and online lenders, these loans typically come with fixed interest rates and predictable monthly payments. Most personal loans are unsecured (meaning no collateral is required). However, secured personal loans, which are easier to qualify for, may also be worth considering.

Home Equity Loan or Line of Credit

If you own your home and have built up equity in it, you might be able to borrow against that equity to access the money that you need. A home equity loan is disbursed in one lump sum that you pay back in equal monthly installments over a fixed term (typically five to 30 years) at a fixed interest rate. A home equity line of credit (HELOC) gives you access to a credit line that you can tap as needed. You only pay interest on what you use.

401(k) Loan

If you have money saved for retirement in a 401(k) account, it may be possible to borrow against it, provided your employer allows this type of program.

With a 401k loan (also called a retirement loan), you take money from your retirement account with the understanding that you will make regular payments, with interest, back into your account. The fees involved will vary depending on your plan administrator. You usually have five years to repay a retirement loan.

Salary Advance

Rather than transferring money from your credit card to your checking account bank account, you might be able to receive a portion of your paycheck early. Whether or not this is an option will depend on your employer’s policies. Some employers offer salary advance programs or will consider a salary advance on a case-by-case basis.

Depending on the program, you might repay the advance a little at a time or all at once. While there may be administrative fees and other costs, some programs don’t cost anything, making this a reasonable alternative to a high-interest credit card advance.

The Takeaway

It’s possible to transfer money from your credit card to your bank account using the cash advance feature. However, you generally only want to do this in the event of an emergency. Cash advance fees and interest rates make this an expensive borrowing option that could lead to a dangerous cycle of credit card debt.

To avoid the need to transfer money from your credit card to your bank, it’s a good idea to keep at least three to six months’ worth of basic living expenses set aside in a separate emergency savings account that earns a competitive interest rate. This will serve as a safety net in case you get hit with a major unexpected bill or lose income.

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FAQ

Will transferring money from my credit card to my bank account hurt my credit score?

Your credit scores likely won’t be impacted if you repay the money from the cash advance promptly. However, cash advances can affect your credit utilization ratio, which is the amount of credit you’re using versus your total available credit. A high credit utilization ratio (typically anything above 30%) can have a negative impact on your credit scores since it implies you rely heavily on borrowed money.

If the added balance of a cash advance transfer to your bank account goes unpaid for a while, it could adversely affect your credit scores.

Is it a good idea to transfer money from a credit card?

A credit card cash advance can be a quick and easy way to get cash fast, but these transfers come at a high cost. Cash advance annual percentage rates (APRs) are often higher than credit card purchase APRs. Not only that, the interest begins to accrue the day you can get the cash. This can lead to a dangerous cycle of debt that can be hard to break. Cash advances also usually come with fees, adding to the cost.

How much does it cost to transfer money using my credit card?

The cost will depend on the credit card issuer. Transferring money to your bank account using your credit card’s cash advance feature usually requires a 3% to 5% fee. You’ll also pay interest on the advance, starting the day you get the transfer. The annual percentage rate (APR) on a cash advance will vary by card issuer but is generally higher than the APR for purchases.

What is the best way to transfer money from credit card to bank?

To transfer money from a credit card to a bank account, you typically need to use your card’s cash advance feature. If your credit card and bank account are with the same institution, you may be able to do the transfer online or through your bank’s mobile app. You can also access a cash advance by going to an ATM or using your credit card’s convenience checks.

Keep in mind, though, that a cash advance usually comes with fees, and interest begins to accrue on the money right away.

How can I get money from my credit card to my bank account without a fee?

You typically can’t get a cash advance from your credit card without paying fees and interest. However, there may be one workaround: If you have a rewards credit card and you have racked up a good amount of points, you may be able to transfer them into your checking account as cash without paying any fees or interest (since it is not a loan).


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