How Much Is Homeowners Insurance? Average Cost in 2022

How Much Is Homeowners Insurance? Average Cost in 2024

According to the latest data, the average cost of homeowners insurance in the United States is $1,754 per year. That said, insurance premiums can vary widely by geography depending on how prone your area is to storms, wildfires, or other natural disasters, as well as factors like the crime rate.

If you’re buying a home, it’s a good idea to buy homeowners insurance coverage to ensure that you and your assets are covered in the event of a worst-case situation. They do happen! Many financial advisors suggest that anywhere from 25% to 40% of your net worth could be tied up in your home, and for some, that proportion can reach as high as 70%.

Let’s pause for a minute and think about what this could mean. Taking an uninsured or underinsured loss on 25% to 70% of your net worth is a hit that few Americans can afford. So it makes sense to protect yourself and shop for the right homeowners insurance policy. Here’s a look at how much you can expect to pay in your area, and why.

Average Cost of Homeowners Insurance by State

Here’s an alphabetical list of the average cost of home insurance premiums by state, per a 2023 Policygenius analysis of home insurance premiums. It will give you a good ballpark of what you might pay for your annual homeowners insurance premium.

State

Annual premium

Monthly premium

Alabama $1,355 $113
Alaska $1,940 $162
Arizona $1,667 $139
Arkansas $2,838 $237
California $1,383 $115
Colorado $2,322 $194
Connecticut $1,329 $111
Delaware $918 $77
Florida $2,288 $191
Georgia $1,950 $163
Hawaii $486 $41
Idaho $1,258 $105
Illinois $1,720 $143
Indiana $1,668 $139
Iowa $1,686 $141
Kansas $2,981 $248
Kentucky $2,565 $214
Louisiana $2,452 $204
Maine $1,020 $85
Maryland $1,539 $128
Massachusetts $1,275 $106
Michigan $1,422 $119
Minnesota $1,829 $152
Mississippi $2,624 $219
Missouri $2,579 $215
Montana $2,140 $178
Nebraska $3,510 $293
Nevada $1,191 $99
New Hampshire $953 $79
New Jersey $886 $74
New Mexico $1,681 $140
New York $1,114 $93
North Carolina $1,545 $129
North Dakota $1,884 $157
Ohio $1,236 $103
Oklahoma $4,161 $347
Oregon $869 $72
Pennsylvania $1,101 $92
Rhode Island $1,303 $109
South Carolina $1,653 $138
South Dakota $311 $26
Tennessee $2,095 $175
Texas $2,919 $243
Utah $894 $75
Vermont $865 $72
Virginia $1,277 $106
Washington $1,159 $97
West Virginia $1,426 $119
Wisconsin $1,150 $96
Wyoming $1,547 $129
United States Average $1,754 $146

Source: Policygenius

You may notice that geography and climate play a role in rates. The states in what is known as Tornado Alley, where storms are more likely, have higher rates. You’ll see that Nebraska, Arkansas, and Kansas, for instance, have higher-priced premiums, reflecting the elevated risk of damage to a home there. Those with homes in coastal areas can also expect higher premiums.

Conversely, those who live in states and towns with low risk of punishing storms will enjoy lower rates for their homeowners insurance.


💡 Quick Tip: A basic homeowners insurance plan doesn’t cover floods, earthquakes, or sinkholes. If you live in an area prone to natural disasters, you may want to look into supplemental coverage.

Average Cost of Homeowners Insurance by City

Those who choose to live in the city may find their rates differ from those of their suburban or rural neighbors. Take a look at the average rates for homeowners insurance policies for 18 major U.S. cities. Here’s how the average premiums stack up:

City

Average annual premium

Average monthly premium

Atlanta $2,049 $171
Boston $1,467 $122
Chicago $2,130 $178
Dallas $3,284 $274
Denver $3,021 $252
Detroit $2,327 $194
Houston $2,936 $245
Los Angeles $1,566 $131
Miami $3,572 $298
Minneapolis $2,010 $168
New York $1,511 $126
Philadelphia $1,654 $138
Phoenix $1,781 $148
San Diego $1,333 $111
San Francisco $1,244 $104
Seattle $1,130 $94
St. Louis $2,389 $199
Tampa $2,266 $189

Source: Policygenius

As you see, there is a wide variation in prices, with Seattle coming in at $1,130 at the low end, and Miami at $3,572 at the high end. Various factors, from weather patterns to crime rate, impact these figures.

Recommended: Does Net Worth Include Home Equity?

What Factors Influence Cost of Homeowners Insurance?

The price of a homeowners insurance policy isn’t just a matter of “location, location, location,” as they say in the real estate business. There are a variety of other factors that influence your home insurance costs. These include features of the property and residence itself, and your insurance history and choices when it comes to coverage. We break down the most commonly cited factors below.

Location: Yes, this is one of the biggest influencers on the price of your policy. Actuaries, the insurance company employees who calculate rates, use complex tables that factor in a variety of risks, including crime, fire, and weather records for a given zip code.

Age and condition of home: The age of your property and its construction quality play big roles in determining what it might cost to repair or replace your home in the event of a covered loss.

Roof condition: An insurance company will likely want to be prepared for repair or replacement costs if, say, a tree branch goes flying during a storm and damages your roof. These repairs can get fairly expensive for certain roof types, such as slate or shale. As a result, your insurance company will take special interest in the type, age, and condition of your existing roof when pricing your policy.

Added features: Adding a swimming pool, trampoline, or the like can certainly make a home more fun, but it can also increase the possibility of personal liability claims. Consequently, these “attractive nuisances” as they are known in the legal field may increase the cost of your premiums.

Coverage limits: When buying a policy, you will have choices that impact the policy price. The more you insure the contents of your home for, the more expensive the price is likely to be. Also, you will decide whether to base your coverage on replacement cost or what’s called actual cash value.

The former will pay the cost of “making you whole” with a payment for a new and comparable feature that was damaged or lost. It is more expensive. With the actual cash value option, though, the policy will deduct depreciation when calculating cash payouts. If you paid $1,000 for your oven a number of years ago, and it’s destroyed in a kitchen fire that’s a covered claim, actual cash value might only pay you back its current value of, say, $250, leaving you without adequate funding to replace it.

Deductible: Your deductible is the amount you must pay out of pocket before insurance will pay out in the event of a covered claim. The amount you choose determines how much risk you’re willing to share with your insurer. A higher deductible generally means a lower-cost home insurance price.

Claims history: Insurance companies view your claims history as an indicator of your likelihood to file future claims. The more claims you’ve filed in the past, the higher your insurance premium is likely to be.

Intended use: Whether you intend to use your home as a primary residence or as an investment property can impact your homeowners insurance rate. Homeowners who choose to use their homes for a business or rent their property out as a landlord are viewed as higher risk and are charged higher home insurance premiums.

Pets: While we consider pets to be part of our families, the truth is that insurance companies charge higher rates for certain pets, particularly breeds viewed as overly aggressive. Why? The insurance company is typically providing coverage if your animal were to injure someone who was visiting. Some insurance companies may even outright reject insurance coverage for certain dogs and exotic animals. However, a number of states have banned these practices of breed discrimination. What’s more, even if you live in a state where this kind of discrimination isn’t banned, you may find that not all insurers restrict coverage or raise premiums for what are considered more aggressive pets. So it can pay to shop around.

What’s Included in a Home Insurance Policy?

If you’re wondering what exactly you get when you purchase a homeowners insurance policy, allow us to spell it out. Here are the six typical coverages offered under most homeowners insurance policies. While some of these may be optional, dwelling, personal property, and personal liability coverage are usually included under most policies.

Dwelling coverage: This pays for covered damages to your home’s structure and attached structures, such as your roof, an attached garage, or built-in appliances.

Other structures coverage: This pays for covered damages to structures on your property that are not attached to your home, such as sheds, fences, or a detached garage.

Personal liability coverage: This kind of coverage pays for injuries or damages to others’ property that you’re legally liable for, as well as legal fees incurred as a result of a covered incident.

Personal property coverage: This is the aspect of your policy that covers damages, losses, and theft of personal property due to a covered incident. This usually includes most belongings like furniture, electronics, and clothing. Worth noting: Certain items are subject to coverage caps, and additional coverage may be needed to ensure fully cover high value items like jewelry, artwork, or antiques.

Medical payments coverage: This pays for the medical bills of anyone injured on your property, regardless of fault.

Loss of use coverage: What if your home were to have fire damage that forced you to live in a hotel while repairs were made? That’s the kind of situation in which loss of use coverage swoops in. It pays for reasonable living expenses if you’re displaced from your home as a result of a covered claim.


💡 Quick Tip: Homeowners insurance covers three basic categories: the building itself, the belongings inside, and your liability if someone gets hurt on your property.

Do You Need Homeowners Insurance?

While you’re not legally required to purchase homeowners insurance, home insurance coverage is typically mandated as part of your contract with your mortgage lender. You will generally have to purchase homeowners insurance in order to close on your home if you’re buying the property using borrowed funds.The lender wants to know that their investment in your home is well protected.

If you do not maintain adequate homeowners insurance while your mortgage remains outstanding, your lender will typically purchase homeowners insurance on your behalf (often at unfavorable rates) and charge you the premiums as part of your monthly mortgage payments. It’s therefore, in your best interest to shop for and maintain your own home insurance policy.

Even if you’re an all cash buyer, having an active homeowners insurance policy is highly recommended. Real estate is where the majority of wealth is concentrated for the vast majority of American households, and it is vital to ensuring that your assets are protected in the event of a disaster. No one wants to imagine it, but bad things do happen every day, from storm damage to home burglaries. It’s important to be prepared.

There are a lot of incentives to buy homeowners insurance, as you see. That’s because it’s a key way to make sure that your home base is well protected, even when worst case situations occur.

Recommended: Should I Sell My House Now or Wait?

The Takeaway

The average price of homeowners insurance is $1,754 per year, but your particular cost will vary based on your location, climate patterns, crime rates, the type of home you live in, your deductible, and many other factors. What doesn’t vary is the fact that homeowners insurance is often a requirement. Even if not, it’s an excellent way to protect what is probably your biggest asset and give you peace of mind.

If you’re a new homebuyer, SoFi Protect can help you look into your insurance options. SoFi and Lemonade offer homeowners insurance that requires no brokers and no paperwork. Secure the coverage that works best for you and your home.

Find affordable homeowners insurance options with SoFi Protect.


Photo credit: iStock/svetikd

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Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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How to Track Home Improvement Costs — and Why You Should

Embarking on a home renovation to transform your living space is an exciting endeavor. Home improvements are also an investment that can significantly increase the value of your property, so it’s important to track expenses to be prepared for capital gains tax when you sell your home. Tracking home improvement costs can also help homeowners stick to a budget and ensure a greater return on investment.

Let’s take a closer look at how to track home improvement costs, which upgrades qualify for tax purposes, and options for financing a home renovation.

First-time homebuyers can
prequalify for a SoFi mortgage loan,
with as little as 3% down.


Why Track Home Improvement Costs?

Amid all the work and logistics that goes into renovations, tracking home improvement costs might not feel like a high priority. However, having documented home improvement costs can help reduce potential capital gains tax when it’s time to sell your home.

The IRS allows qualifying home improvement costs to be added to the original purchase price of the property, known as the cost basis, when calculating capital gains on a home sale. The basis is subtracted from the home sale price to determine if you’ve realized a gain and subsequently owe tax. But by adding home improvement expenses to your cost basis, the profit from the sale that’s subject to taxes decreases — lowering or even potentially exempting you from property gains tax.

Besides home improvements, other factors that affect property value, like location and the current housing market, could make a property sale subject to capital gains tax.

Here’s an example of how capital gains tax on a home sale works: A married couple that purchased a home for $200,000 in 2001 and sold it for $750,000 in 2024 would have a $550,000 realized gain. Assuming that the sellers made this home their main residence for two of the last five years, they’d be able to exclude $500,000 of the gain from taxes. The remaining $50,000 would be taxed at 0%, 15%, or 20% based on the sellers’ income and how long they owned the property.

However, the sellers spent $70,000 on home improvements during their 23 years of homeownership, so the capital gains calculation would be revised to: $750,000 – ($200,000 + $70,000) = $480,000. Tracking home improvement costs in this example exempted the sellers from needing to pay capital gains taxes.

Note that single filers may exclude only the first $250,000 of realized gains from the sale of their home. Eligibility for the exclusion also requires living in the home for at least two years out of the last five years leading up to the date of sale. Those who own vacation homes should note that the IRS has very specific rules about what constitutes a main residence.


💡 Quick Tip: A Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC) brokered by SoFi lets you access up to $500,000 of your home’s equity (up to 90%) to pay for, well, just about anything. It could be a smart way to consolidate debts or find the funds for a big home project.

Qualifying vs Nonqualifying Improvements

The IRS sets guidelines that determine what home improvements can be added to your cost basis for calculating capital gains tax. Thus, not every dollar spent on sprucing up your home’s curb appeal or living space needs to be tracked for tax purposes. Generally, tracking costs is a good idea for any home improvements that increase your home’s value and fall outside general repair and upkeep to maintain the property’s condition.

Qualifying Improvements

According to the IRS, improvements that add value to the home, prolong its useful life, or adapt it to new uses can qualify. This includes the following categories and home improvements:

•   Home additions: Bedroom, bathroom, deck, garage, porch, or patio

•   Home systems: HVAC systems, central humidifier, central vacuum, air/water filtration systems, wiring, security systems, law and sprinkler systems.

•   Lawn & grounds: Landscaping, driveway improvements, fencing, walkways, retaining walls, and pools

•   Exterior: Storm windows, roofing, doors, siding

•   Interior: Built-in appliances, kitchen upgrades, flooring, wall-to-wall carpeting, fireplaces

•   Insulation: Attic, walls, floors, pipes, and ductwork

•   Plumbing: Septic system, water heater, soft water system, filtration system

It’s also important to track any tax credits or subsidies received for energy-related home improvements, such as solar panels or a heat pump system, since these incentives must be subtracted from the cost basis.

Recommended: How to Find a Contractor for Home Renovations and Remodeling

Nonqualifying Expenses

Owning a home requires routine maintenance and occasional repairs — think fixing a leaky pipe or mowing the lawn. And the longer you own your home, the greater the chance you reapproach past home improvements with a fresh design or modern technologies. The IRS considers regular maintenance and any home improvement that’s been later replaced as nonqualifying costs.

For instance, a homeowner could have installed wall-to-wall carpet and later swapped it out for hardwood floors. In this case, the hardwood floors would qualify, but not the carpeting.

Recommended: The Costs of Owning a Home

How to Track Your Costs

Developing a system for tracking home improvement costs depends in part on where you are in the process. Here’s how to get track home improvement costs before, during, and after a renovation project.

Before You Renovate

The average cost to renovate a house can vary from $20,000 to $80,000 based on the size of the home and type of improvements. Given this range in cost expectations, it’s helpful to create an itemized budget that estimates the cost for each improvement. It’s hardly uncommon for renovations to take more time and money than expected, so consider budgeting an extra 10-20% for the unexpected.

Your itemized budget can be leveraged for tracking home improvement costs once the project starts. Simply plug in the completion date, cost, and description for each improvement, and keep receipts, to itemize the expense as it’s incurred.

Recommended: How to Make a Budget in 5 Steps

Keep Detailed Records

Tracking home improvement costs goes beyond crunching the numbers. The IRS requires documentation to adjust the cost basis on a property. As improvements are made, catalog contractor and store receipts and take pictures before and after the work is done to document the improvements for your records. Store these records digitally in a secure and accessible location; the IRS recommends keeping records for three years after the tax return for the year in which you sell your home.

Catch Up After the Fact

Tracking home improvement costs after the work has been completed is doable, but it requires more effort. If your renovations required any building permits, your municipality should have records on file.

For other projects, start by searching your email for receipts and records can help find a paper trail and track down documentation. Reach out to contractors you worked with for copies of missing receipts or invoices. If you paid with a check or credit card, you can browse through your previous statements or contact the bank for assistance.

Consult a Tax Pro

Taxes are complicated. If you have any doubts about what improvements qualify, consult a tax professional for assistance. Homeowners who used their property as a home office or rented it for any duration could especially benefit from a tax pro. Any property depreciation that was claimed in previous tax years may need to be recaptured if the home sale price exceeds the cost basis.

Home Improvement Financing Options

Renovations and upgrades to your home can be expensive. Many homeowners use a combination of savings and financing to pay for home improvements.

•   HELOC: A Home Equity Line Of Credit lets homeowners tap into their existing equity to fund a variety of expenses, such as home improvements. With a HELOC, you can take out what you need as you need it, rather than the full amount you’re approved for, which is often 75%-85% of your home’s value. You only pay interest on the amount you draw.

•   Cash-out refinance: Some owners take out a new home loan that allows them to pay off their old mortgage but also provides them with a lump sum of cash that they can use for home repairs (or other expenses). How much cash you might be able to take will depend on the amount of equity you have in your home.

•   Personal loan: An unsecured personal loan could be a good option for quick funding that doesn’t require using your home as collateral. The interest rate and whether you qualify are largely based on your credit score.

•   Credit card: Financing a home improvement with a credit card can help earn cash back or rewards on your investment. However, these perks should be weighed against the risk of higher interest rates. If using a 0% interest credit card, crunch the numbers to ensure you can pay off the balance before the introductory offer expires.


💡 Quick Tip: You can use money you get with a cash-out refi for any purpose, including home renovations, consolidating other high-interest debts, funding a child’s education, or buying another property.

The Takeaway

Tracking home improvement costs from the start can help stick to your project budget and lead to significant tax savings when it comes time to sell your property. A HELOC is one way to fund home improvements, and may be especially useful to borrowers who aren’t sure how much money they will need for home projects. If you’re unsure whether a home improvement qualifies under the IRS rules around capital gains tax on home sales, consult a tax professional.

SoFi now offers flexible HELOCs. Our HELOC options allow you to access up to 95% of your home’s value, or $500,000, at competitively low rates. And the application process is quick and convenient.

Unlock your home’s value with a home equity line of credit brokered by SoFi.


Photo credit: iStock/Cucurudza

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All loan terms, fees, and rates may vary based upon individual financial and personal circumstances and state.

You may discuss with your loan officer whether a SoFi Mortgage or a home equity loan from Spring EQ is appropriate. Please note that the SoFi member discount does not apply to Home Equity Loans or Lines of Credit brokered through SoFi. Terms and conditions will apply. Before you apply for a SoFi Mortgage, please note that not all products are offered in all states, and all loans are subject to eligibility restrictions and limitations, including requirements related to loan applicant’s credit, income, property, and loan amount. Minimum loan amount is $75,000. Lowest rates are reserved for the most creditworthy borrowers. Products, rates, benefits, terms, and conditions are subject to change without notice. Learn more at SoFi.com/eligibility-criteria.

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In the event SoFi serves as broker to Spring EQ for your loan, SoFi will be paid a fee.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

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What Happens to the House When You Get Divorced?

When a couple decides to divorce, what happens to the house will depend on several factors, including state law. The partners might continue to jointly hold the property, sell the home, or one could buy the other out.

Getting divorced is usually not an easy situation. Setting aside the major impact on one’s emotional life and family, it can be challenging to tackle what happens to the home and the mortgage, which often represent the biggest asset a married couple owns.

Here, you’ll learn the answer to important questions about divorce and your home, including:

•   When you get divorced, what happens to the house?

•   How does assumption of a mortgage after divorce impact taxes?

•   How can your credit score be affected in a divorce with a mortgage?

First-time homebuyers can
prequalify for a SoFi mortgage loan,
with as little as 3% down.


Who Gets the House in a Divorce?

In an ideal divorce scenario, spouses will agree on how all property will be divided (and address other major concerns, such as child custody and debt responsibilities). If you and your spouse are able to agree to all terms of the separation without needing litigation, you can get an uncontested divorce much more affordably.

But what happens to the house when you get divorced and can’t agree on things? That often comes down to where you live. State law can play a key role in the outcome.


💡 Quick Tip: Buying a home shouldn’t be aggravating. SoFi’s online mortgage application is quick and simple, with dedicated Mortgage Loan Officers to guide you through the process.

Divorce and State Laws

When you get married, it is your state, not the federal government, that awards marriage licenses. Just think about the classic marriage ceremony line, “By the power vested in me by the state of XYZ.”

That means, state laws, rather than federal laws, will impact property division and debts in a divorce. In general, you’ll be in one of two types of states:

•   Common law property

•   Community property

The type of state you live in will dictate how the judge will approach the division of assets in a divorce proceeding.

Note that prenuptial and postnuptial agreements can impact the application of these laws and the assumption of a mortgage (and other property) in a divorce.

Common Law Property States

In a common law property state (also called separate property state), a married couple can own assets separately, like a car. Some spouses may choose not to open a joint bank account; some may keep their earnings and their debts separate.

Living in a common law property state means one spouse can even make a major purchase, such as a house, solely in their name, with only their name on the deed. However, that doesn’t mean that partner would necessarily automatically get the house in a divorce. Instead, common law property states use equitable distribution.

When engaging in equitable distribution, the judge will do their best to fairly distribute all assets. One spouse may get the house, but the other could get a mix of various assets roughly equivalent to the property.

Equitable distribution does not necessarily mean a 50/50 split. Instead, the judge will consider factors such as:

•   How long you’ve been married

•   How much each spouse earns, as well as future earning projections

•   Your age and health

•   Whether one spouse has another property to live in.

From these and other factors, the judge will attempt an equitable distribution of all assets that is fair, but not necessarily equal. The judge does not consider fault during these proceedings, even if one spouse is deemed responsible for the divorce, say, due to infidelity.

Most states are common law states, but you can check with a divorce attorney or your state’s website to understand the unique divorce laws where you live. Here’s a list of common law states:

•   Alabama

•   Alaska

•   Arkansas

•   Colorado

•   Connecticut

•   Delaware

•   Florida

•   Georgia

•   Hawaii

•   Illinois

•   Indiana

•   Iowa

•   Kansas

•   Kentucky

•   Maine

•   Maryland

•   Massachusetts

•   Michigan

•   Minnesota

•   Mississippi

•   Missouri

•   Montana

•   Nebraska

•   New Hampshire

•   New Jersey

•   New York

•   North Carolina

•   North Dakota

•   Ohio

•   Oklahoma

•   Oregon

•   Pennsylvania

•   Rhode Island

•   South Carolina

•   South Dakota

•   Tennessee

•   Utah

•   Vermont

•   Virginia

•   West Virginia

•   Wyoming

Community Property States

Only a handful of states are considered community property states, which strive for an even split of all assets. When you get married in a community property (also called shared property) state, you own all assets acquired during the marriage together, no matter who purchased an item or took on a debt.

In such states, property must be divided 50/50. Because you can’t split a house down the middle, the court will work to find other ways to ensure equitable distribution of assets. (For instance, if one spouse gets a home with $30,000 of equity, the other spouse must receive $30,000 of equity in some other way.)

Here’s a list of community property states:

•   Arizona

•   California

•   Idaho

•   Louisiana

•   Nevada

•   New Mexico

•   Texas

•   Washington

•   Wisconsin.

Option 1: Sell the House and Split the Profits

The first and most obvious option for spouses to consider when getting a divorce is to sell the house and split the profits. If neither spouse wants to retain the house, this is ideal — both spouses can walk away with something to fund their next move, whether it’s an apartment, condo, or another house.

Of course, that can be easier said than done. Selling a house can be a lot of work, so you’ll need to get on the same page about who’s doing what to get the house ready, work with a real estate agent, and maintain the mortgage and other costs until it’s sold.

This may be your only option if neither you nor your spouse can afford (or wants to keep) the house on your own. Getting used to living on a single income can be a tough transition and require smart budgeting after divorce.

Pros

•   It’s an easy way to split profits 50/50.

•   If the market is good, both spouses could benefit.

•   No one has to live in a house with difficult memories.

Cons

•   Selling a house requires a lot of work.

•   The market may not be favorable.

•   Children from the marriage may not be ready to say goodbye to their home.

Option 2: Maintain a Joint Mortgage

Spouses who are able to remain civil and trust each other may consider keeping a joint mortgage for one of two reasons:

•   Spouses can take turns living in the house and spending time with kids. This means kids don’t have to go back and forth from two places and can keep some routine in their lives in what’s an otherwise turbulent time for them.

•   Spouses with a nice house in a great market can earn and split profits by renting out the home or using it as a vacation rental.

Pros

•   There’s no complicated paperwork to transition an asset or difficult process to sell the house.

•   Kids can retain a sense of normalcy by living in the home with their parents.

•   In a good market, spouses can earn a profit by renting out the house together.

Cons

•   Eventually, you’ll still likely want to sell the home. You’re simply putting it off now by retaining the mortgage.

•   Ending a marriage is tough; there’s a cost of divorce, both financially and emotionally. Things might be civil now, but that can always change — and owning property together could be difficult.

•   Without profit from the sale of the home, spouses may have difficulty finding a new place to live after the divorce.

Recommended: How to Prepare Financially for a Divorce

Option 3: One Partner Buys Out the Other

In an uncontested divorce, spouses may agree that one person can keep the house and the other will receive something else to be financially fair — money or other assets, usually.

But this can also be worked out in the courts during a divorce settlement. For instance, a spouse may choose to let their partner retain the house in exchange for not having to make alimony payments. Or the spouse not assuming the mortgage in the divorce may simply get the rest of the assets.

To ensure equitable compensation, the spouse not getting the house could even receive monthly payments from the spouse who retains the mortgage over a set amount of time. Divorce attorneys can get creative with these arrangements to find a solution both partners are happy with.

Pros

•   There’s no urgency to sell the house.

•   The spouse who wants to keep the house can retain it.

•   The spouse who doesn’t want to keep the house gets compensated fairly in another way.

Cons

•   This isn’t necessarily an easy decision if both spouses want to keep the house.

•   Because home values can go up or down, the split may not be equitable in the long run.

•   A fight over the house in court could make the divorce more acrimonious (and difficult for any children involved).

Tax Implications

Fortunately, there aren’t major tax implications if you get the house in a divorce. The IRS does not treat property transfers between spouses — even those divorcing — as a sort of financial gain or loss. Instead, you’ll treat the property as gift income for taxes, but the property value is not taxable.

As with most aspects of taxes, there are always exceptions. Reach out to a tax accountant, or review IRS guidelines if you have questions.

Credit Score Implications

Property distribution in a divorce won’t directly impact your credit score either. That said, if you are the spouse who does not retain the house, your name will no longer be on the mortgage loan. That affects your credit mix and length of credit history, which can impact your score in the long run.

Similarly, if you are the spouse who is assuming a mortgage after divorce, but you suddenly find that you’re struggling to make on-time payments because of your new financial situation. You could risk damaging your score by falling behind on payments.

And what if a spouse stops paying a mortgage during a divorce, when your name is still on the loan? That can indeed hurt your credit score, so it’s crucial that you and your spouse work together to make sure you’re making these and other shared payments every month.

Recommended: Am I Responsible for My Spouse’s Debt?

How Refinancing Can Help

If you are the spouse who keeps the home in a divorce, the court may require you to refinance to get your ex’s name off the mortgage.

Doing this can be great not just for the convenience of getting their name off the loan. You may be able to work with a lender to obtain a more manageable monthly payment based on your single income. Depending on your credit and the current market conditions, you might even get a lower interest rate.

In this case, refinancing a home mortgage could be an advantageous move for you.


💡 Quick Tip: Have you improved your credit score since you made your home purchase? Home loan refinancing with SoFi could get you a competitive interest rate with lower payments.

The Takeaway

Divorce can often be a tough and tumultuous time. One of the big financial decisions to make is what happens to the house when your union ends. The state you live in may impact how the court rules in the division of assets. You may both continue to hold the property jointly, sell it, or one partner might buy the other one out. And if you end up with the house, you may need to (or want to) refinance your mortgage to make payments more manageable. Working with a divorce lawyer may be your best bet for navigating all these difficult questions and decisions.

Looking for an affordable option for a home mortgage loan? SoFi can help: We offer low down payments (as little as 3% - 5%*) with our competitive and flexible home mortgage loans. Plus, applying is extra convenient: It's online, with access to one-on-one help.

SoFi Mortgages: simple, smart, and so affordable.


Photo credit: iStock/Sundry Photography

*SoFi requires Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) for conforming home loans with a loan-to-value (LTV) ratio greater than 80%. As little as 3% down payments are for qualifying first-time homebuyers only. 5% minimum applies to other borrowers. Other loan types may require different fees or insurance (e.g., VA funding fee, FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums, etc.). Loan requirements may vary depending on your down payment amount, and minimum down payment varies by loan type.

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


SoFi Mortgages
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. Not all products are available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.

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Inexpensive Ways to Refresh Your Home Room by Room

Home Office Tax Deductions: Do You Qualify?

Millions of employees work from home at least part time. They’ve carved out dedicated office space and plopped laptops on kitchen counters and in closets. They almost never can declare the home office tax deduction.

Millions of self-employed people have also created workspaces at home. If they use that part of their home exclusively and regularly for conducting business, and the home is the principal place of business, they may be able to deduct office-related business expenses.

Why the difference? The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act nearly doubled the standard deduction and eliminated many itemized deductions, including unreimbursed employee expenses, from 2018 to 2025.

Read on to learn whether or not you may qualify for the home office tax deduction.

What Is a Home Office Tax Deduction?

The home office tax deduction is available to self-employed people — independent contractors, sole proprietors, members of a business partnership, freelancers, and gig workers who require an office — who use part of their home, owned or rented, as a place of work regularly and exclusively.

“Home” can be a house, condo, apartment, mobile home, boat, or similar property, and includes structures on the property like an unattached garage, studio, barn, or greenhouse.

Eligible taxpayers can take a simplified deduction of up to $1,500 or go the detailed route and deduct office furniture, homeowners or renters insurance, internet, utilities needed for the business, repairs, and maintenance that affect the office, home depreciation, rent, mortgage interest, and many other things from taxable income.

After all, reducing taxable income is particularly important for the highly taxed self-employed (viewed by the IRS as both employee and employer.)

An employee who also has a side gig — like driving for Uber or dog walking — can deduct certain expenses from their self-employment income if they run the business out of their home.


💡 Quick Tip: You deserve a more zen mortgage. Look for a mortgage lender who’s dedicated to closing your loan on time.

Am I Eligible for a Home Office Deduction?

People who receive a W-2 form from their employer almost never qualify.

In general, a self-employed person who receives one or more IRS 1099-NEC tax forms may take the home office tax deduction.

Both of these must apply:

•   You use the business part of your home exclusively and regularly for business purposes.

•   The business part of your home is your main place of business; the place where you deal with patients or customers in the normal course of your business; or a structure not attached to the home that you use in connection with your business.

Regular and Exclusive Use

You must use a portion of the home for business needs on a regular basis. The real trick is to meet the IRS standard for the exclusive use of a home office. An at-home worker may spend nine hours a day, five days a week in a home office, yet is not supposed to take the home office deduction if the space is shared with a spouse or doubles as a gym or a child’s homework spot.

There are two exceptions to the IRS exclusive-use rules for home businesses.

•   Daycare providers. Individuals offering daycare from home likely qualify for the home office tax deduction. Part of the home is used as a daycare facility for children, people with physical or mental disabilities, or people who are 65 and older. (If you run a daycare, your business-use percentage must be reduced because the space is available for personal use part of the time.)

•   Storage of business products. If a home-based businessperson uses a portion of the home to store inventory or product samples, it’s OK to use that area for personal use as well. The home must be the only fixed location of the business or trade.

Principal Place of Business

Part of your home may qualify as your principal place of business “if you use it for the administrative or management activities of your trade or business and have no other fixed location where you conduct substantial administrative or management activities for that trade or business,” the IRS says.

Can You Qualify for a Home Office Deduction as an Employee?

Employees may only take the deduction if they maintain a home office for the “convenience of their employer,” meaning the home office is a condition of employment, necessary for the employer’s business to function, or needed to allow the employee to perform their duties.

Because your home must be your principal place of business in order to take the home office deduction, most employees who work part-time at home won’t qualify.

Can I Run More Than One Business in the Same Space?

If you have more than one Schedule C business, you can claim the same home office space, but you’ll have to split the expenses between the businesses. You cannot deduct the home office expenses multiple times.

How to Calculate the Home Office Tax Deduction

The deduction is most commonly based on square footage or the percentage of a home used as the home office.

The Simplified Method

If your office is 300 square feet or under, Uncle Sam allows you to deduct $5 per square foot, up to 300 square feet, for a maximum $1,500 tax deduction.

The Real Expense Method

The regular method looks at the percentage of the home used for business purposes. If your home office is 480 square feet and the home has 2,400 square feet, the percentage used for the home office tax deduction is 20%.

You may deduct 20% of indirect business expenses like utilities, cellphone, cable, homeowners or renters insurance, property tax, HOA fees, and cleaning service.

Direct expenses for the home office, such as painting, furniture, office supplies, and repairs, are 100% deductible.


💡 Quick Tip: A major home purchase may mean a jumbo loan, but it doesn’t have to mean a jumbo down payment. Apply for a jumbo mortgage with SoFi, and you could put as little as 10% down.

Things to Look Out for Before Applying for the Home Office Tax Deduction

If you’re an employee with side gigs or just self-employed, it might be a good idea to consult a tax pro when filing.

To avoid raising red flags, you may want to make sure your business expenses are reasonable, accurate, and well-documented. The IRS uses both automated and manual methods of examining self-employed workers’ tax returns. And in 2020, the agency created a Fraud Enforcement Office, part of its Small Business/Self-Employed Division. Among the filers in its sights are self-employed people.

The IRS conducts audits by mail or in-person to review records. The interview may be at an IRS office or at the tax filer’s home.

A final note: Taking all the deductions you’re entitled to and being informed about the different types of taxes is smart.

If you’re self-employed, you generally must pay a Social Security and Medicare tax of 15.3% of net earnings. Wage-earners pay 7.65% of gross income into Social Security and Medicare via payroll-tax withholding, matched by the employer.

So self-employed people often feel the burn at tax time. It’s smart to look for deductions and write off those home business expenses if you’re able to.

To shelter income and invest for retirement, you might want to set up a SEP IRA if you’re a self-employed professional with no employees.

Recommended: First-Time Homebuyers Guide

The Takeaway

If you’re an employee working remotely, the home office tax deduction is not for you, right now, anyway.

If you’re self-employed, the home office deduction could be helpful at tax time. To qualify for the home office deduction, you must use a portion of your house, apartment, or condominium (or any other type of home) for your business on a regular basis, and it generally must be the principal location of your business. This is something to keep in mind if you’re in the market for a new home, since writing off a portion of your home expenses could help offset some of the costs of homeownership.

Looking for an affordable option for a home mortgage loan? SoFi can help: We offer low down payments (as little as 3% - 5%*) with our competitive and flexible home mortgage loans. Plus, applying is extra convenient: It's online, with access to one-on-one help.


SoFi Mortgages: simple, smart, and so affordable.

FAQ

How much can I get written off for my home office?

Using the simplified method of calculating the home office deduction, you can write off up to $1,500. Using the regular method, you’ll need to determine the percentage of your home being used for business purposes. You may then be able to deduct that percentage of certain indirect expenses (like utilities, cellphone, cable, homeowners or renters insurance, property tax, HOA fees, and cleaning services). Direct expenses for the home office, such as painting, furniture, office supplies, and repairs, are generally 100% deductible.

Can I make a claim for a home office tax deduction without receipts?

The simplified method does not require detailed records of expenses. If using the regular method, you should be prepared to defend your deduction in the event of an IRS audit.

The IRS says the law requires you to keep all records you used to prepare your tax return for at least three years from the date the return was filed.

What qualifies as a home office deduction?

Things like insurance, utilities, repairs, maintenance, equipment, and rent may qualify as tax deductions.


Photo credit: iStock/Marija Zlatkovic

SoFi Mortgages
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. Not all products are available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.


SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


*SoFi requires Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) for conforming home loans with a loan-to-value (LTV) ratio greater than 80%. As little as 3% down payments are for qualifying first-time homebuyers only. 5% minimum applies to other borrowers. Other loan types may require different fees or insurance (e.g., VA funding fee, FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums, etc.). Loan requirements may vary depending on your down payment amount, and minimum down payment varies by loan type.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

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How Much Will a $350,000 Mortgage Cost You?

Over the life of a $350,000 mortgage with a 7% interest rate, borrowers could expect to pay from $216,229 to $488,233 in total interest, depending on whether they opt for a 15-year or 30-year loan term. But the actual cost of a mortgage depends on several factors, including the interest rate, and whether you have to pay private mortgage insurance.

Besides interest, homebuyers need to account for a down payment, closing costs, and the long-term costs of taxes and insurances that are included in a $350,000 mortgage payment.

First-time homebuyers can
prequalify for a SoFi mortgage loan,
with as little as 3% down.


Cost of a $350,000 Mortgage

When you finance a home purchase, you have to pay back more than the borrowed amount, known as the loan principal. The total cost of taking out a $350,000 mortgage is $838,281 with a 30-year term at a 7% interest rate. This comes out to $488,233 worth of interest, assuming there aren’t any late monthly mortgage payments or pre-payments.

When you buy a home, there are usually some upfront costs you’ll have to pay, too. Mortgages often require a down payment, calculated as a percentage of home purchase price, that’s paid out of pocket to secure financing from a lender. The required amount varies by loan type and lender, but average down payments range from 3% – 20%.

Closing costs, including home inspections, appraisals, and attorney fees, represent another upfront cost for real estate transactions. They typically sum up to 3% to 6% of the loan principal, or $10,500 to $21,000 on a $350,000 mortgage.

The total down payment on $350,000 mortgages also impacts the total cost of taking out a home loan. Unless buyers put 20% or more down on a home purchase, they’ll have to pay private mortgage insurance (PMI) with their monthly mortgage payment. The annual cost of PMI is generally between 0.5% – 1.5% of the loan principal. Borrowers can get out of paying PMI with a mortgage refinance or when they reach 20% equity in their home. If this is your first time in the housing market, consider reading up on tips to qualify for a mortgage.


💡 Quick Tip: When house hunting, don’t forget to lock in your home mortgage loan rate so there are no surprises if your offer is accepted.

Monthly Payments for a $350,000 Mortgage

The monthly payment on a $350K mortgage won’t always be the same amount. You’ll need to factor in your down payment, interest rate, and loan term to estimate your $350,000 mortgage monthly payment.

With a 30-year loan term and 7% interest rate, borrowers can expect to pay around $2,328 a month. Whereas a 15-year term at the same rate would have a monthly payment of approximately $3,146. However, these estimates only account for the loan principal and interest. Monthly mortgage payments also include taxes and insurances, but these costs can differ considerably by location and based on a home’s assessed value.

There are also different types of mortgages to consider. Whether you opt for a fixed vs adjustable-rate mortgage, for instance, will affect your monthly payment.

To get a clearer idea of what your monthly payment might be with different down payments and loan terms, try using a mortgage calculator.

Recommended: Best Affordable Places to Live in the U.S.

Where to Get a $350,000 Mortgage

Homebuyers have many options in terms of lenders, including banks, credit unions, mortgage brokers, and online lenders.

The homebuying process can be stressful, so it may be tempting to go with the first mortgage offer you receive. However, shopping around and getting loan estimates from multiple lenders lets you choose the one that’s the most competitive and cost-effective.

Even a fraction of a percentage point difference on an interest rate can add up to thousands in savings over the life of a mortgage. Besides the interest rate, assess the fees, terms, and closing costs when comparing mortgage offers.

Recommended: Home Loan Help Center

What to Consider Before Applying for a $350,000 Mortgage

When taking out a mortgage, it’s important to consider the total cost of the loan. You’ll need cash on hand for a down payment and closing costs, plus sufficient income and funds to cover the monthly payment and other homeownership costs.

Before applying for a $350,000 mortgage, crunching the numbers in a housing affordability calculator can give a better understanding of how these costs will work with your finances.

It’s also helpful to see how $350,000 mortgage monthly payments are applied to the loan interest and principal over the life of the loan. The majority of the monthly mortgage payment goes toward interest rather than paying off the loan principal, as demonstrated by the amortization schedules below.

Here’s the mortgage amortization schedule for a 30-year $350,000 mortgage with a 7% interest rate — which would amount to $488,233 in interest. For comparison, we’ve also included the mortgage amortization schedule for a 15-year $350,000 mortgage with a 7% interest rate. A $350,000 mortgage payment, 15 years’ out, would add up to $216,229 in interest. When weighing a 30-year vs 15-year loan term, the shorter loan term carries a higher monthly payment but less than half the total interest over the life of the loan.

Amortization Schedule, 30-year Mortgage at 7%

Year Beginning Balance Total Interest Paid Total Principal Paid Remaining Balance
1 $350,000 $24,386 $3,555 $346,425
2 $346,425 $24,129 $3,812 $342,613
3 $342,613 $23,853 $4,088 $338,525
4 $338,525 $23,558 $4,383 $334,142
5 $334,142 $23,241 $4,700 $329,442
6 $329,442 $22,901 $5,040 $324,402
7 $324,402 $22,537 $5,404 $318,998
8 $318,998 $22,146 $5,795 $313,203
9 $313,203 $21,717 $6,214 $306,989
10 $306,989 $21,278 $6,663 $300,326
11 $300,326 $20,796 $7,145 $293,182
12 $293,182 $20,280 $7,661 $285,520
13 $285,520 $19,726 $8,215 $277,306
14 $277,306 $19,132 $8,809 $268,497
15 $268,497 $18,496 $9,446 $259,051
16 $259,051 $17,813 $10,128 $248,923
17 $248,923 $17,081 $10,861 $238,062
18 $238,062 $16,295 $11,646 $226,417
19 $226,417 $15,454 $12,488 $213,929
20 $213,929 $14,551 $13,390 $200,539
21 $200,539 $13,583 $14,358 $186,181
22 $186,181 $12,545 $15,396 $170,784
23 $170,784 $11,432 $16,509 $154,275
24 $154,275 $10,238 $17,703 $136,573
25 $136,573 $8,959 $18,982 $117,590
26 $117,590 $7,586 $20,355 $97,236
27 $97,236 $6,115 $21,826 $75,409
28 $75,409 $4,537 $23,404 $52,006
29 $52,006 $2,845 $25,096 $26,910
30 $26,910 $1,031 $26,910 $0

Amortization Schedule, 15-year Mortgage at 7%

Year Beginning Balance Total Interest Paid Total Principal Paid Remaining Balance
1 $350,000 $24,065 $13,684 $336,296
2 $336,296 $23,076 $14,673 $321,624
3 $321,624 $22,015 $15,733 $305,890
4 $305,890 $20,878 $16,871 $289,020
5 $289,020 $19,658 $18,090 $270,929
6 $270,929 $18,351 $19,398 $251,531
7 $251,531 $16,948 $20,800 $230,731
8 $230,731 $15,445 $22,304 $208,427
9 $208,427 $13,832 $23,916 $184,510
10 $184,510 $12,103 $25,645 $158,865
11 $158,865 $10,249 $27,499 $131,366
12 $131,366 $8,261 $29,487 $101,879/td>
13 $101,879 $6,130 $31,619 $70,260
14 $70,260 $3,844 $33,904 $36,355
15 $36,355 $1,393 $36,355 $0

Recommended: The Cost of Living By State

How to Get a $350,000 Mortgage

To qualify for a $350,000 mortgage, borrowers will need to meet the income, credit, and down payment requirements. It’s also important to have an adequate budget for long-term housing costs and other financial goals and obligations like savings and debt.

Using the 28/36 rule, a monthly mortgage payment shouldn’t be more than 28% of your monthly gross income and 36% of your total debt to be considered affordable. With a $2,328 monthly mortgage payment, you’d need a minimum gross monthly income of at least $8,300, or annual income of $96,600, to follow the 28% rule. Similarly, your total debt could not exceed $660 to keep housing and debt costs from surpassing 36%.

Home mortgage loans, with the exception of certain government-backed loans, require a minimum credit score of 620 to qualify. However, a higher credit score can help secure more competitive rates. If you qualify as a first-time homebuyer, you could get a FHA loan with a credit score of 500 or higher, though borrowers with a credit score below 580 will have to make a 10% down payment.

As mentioned above, it’s a good idea to compare lenders and loan types to find the most favorable rate and loan terms. From there, getting preapproved for a home loan is a logical next step to determine the loan amount and interest rate you qualify for. It also puts you in a better position to demonstrate you’re a serious buyer when making an offer on a property.

After putting in an offer, completing the mortgage application requires many of the same forms used for preapproval, plus an earnest money deposit.


💡 Quick Tip: Generally, the lower your debt-to-income ratio, the better loan terms you’ll be offered. One way to improve your ratio is to increase your income (hello, side hustle!). Another way is to consolidate your debt and lower your monthly debt payments.

The Takeaway

Buying a home is the largest purchase many Americans make in their lifetime. How much you’ll end up paying for a $350,000 mortgage depends on the interest rate and loan term. On a $350,000 mortgage, the monthly payment can range from $2,328 to $3,146 based on these factors.

Looking for an affordable option for a home mortgage loan? SoFi can help: We offer low down payments (as little as 3% - 5%*) with our competitive and flexible home mortgage loans. Plus, applying is extra convenient: It's online, with access to one-on-one help.

SoFi Mortgages: simple, smart, and so affordable.

FAQ

How much is a $350K mortgage a month?

The cost of a $350,000 monthly mortgage payment is influenced by the loan term and interest rate. On a $350K mortgage with 7% interest, the monthly payment ranges from $2,328 to $3,146 depending on the loan term.

How much income is required for $350,000 mortgage?

Income requirements can vary by lender. But using the 28/36 rule, a borrower who isn’t burdened by lots of other debts should make $99,600 a year to afford the monthly payment on a $350,000 mortgage.

How much is a down payment on a $350,000 mortgage?

The down payment amount depends on the loan type and lender terms. FHA loans require down payments of 3.5% or 10%, while buyers could qualify for a conventional loan with as little as 3% down.

Can I afford a $350K house with a $70K salary?

It may be possible to afford a $350,000 house with a $70,000 salary, but only if you are able to make a sizable down payment to lessen the amount of money you need to borrow. Having a good credit score and minimal debt would also better your chances.


Photo credit: iStock/sturti

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


SoFi Mortgages
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. Not all products are available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.


*SoFi requires Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) for conforming home loans with a loan-to-value (LTV) ratio greater than 80%. As little as 3% down payments are for qualifying first-time homebuyers only. 5% minimum applies to other borrowers. Other loan types may require different fees or insurance (e.g., VA funding fee, FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums, etc.). Loan requirements may vary depending on your down payment amount, and minimum down payment varies by loan type.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

¹FHA loans are subject to unique terms and conditions established by FHA and SoFi. Ask your SoFi loan officer for details about eligibility, documentation, and other requirements. FHA loans require an Upfront Mortgage Insurance Premium (UFMIP), which may be financed or paid at closing, in addition to monthly Mortgage Insurance Premiums (MIP). Maximum loan amounts vary by county. The minimum FHA mortgage down payment is 3.5% for those who qualify financially for a primary purchase. SoFi is not affiliated with any government agency.

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