The Facts About Getting Audited: Woman writing in notebook

What Happens When You Get Audited?

What is it about the words “tax audit” that so many people find so anxiety-provoking? The idea that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) could be poring over your tax return can be downright nerve-racking, not to mention the possibility of mistakes found and penalties incurred.

But take a deep, calming breath: Over the last decade, the IRS audit rate has been declining. In 2022 (the most recent data available), the odds of an audit were 3.8 out of every 1,000 returns filed (0.38%), a slight decline from tax year 2021, when the odds of audit were 4.1 out of every 1,000 returns filed (0.41%).

But even so, you likely want to do your best to avoid going through that process. This is an informative, high-level overview of IRS audit triggers, and it should not be considered tax advice. It’s always worth consulting a tax professional for any questions or concerns because taxes are complicated and highly personal.

Read on to learn:

•   What is an audit?

•   What are reasons why someone may get audited?

•   What should you do if you get audited by the IRS?

What Is a Tax Audit?

A tax audit is a process by which the IRS reviews an individual’s or organization’s accounts as well as their financial details to make sure that the information submitted has been reported correctly and in keeping with the prevailing tax laws.

The IRS usually sends a letter when it reaches out to ask for more information, and the letter should let you know specifically what the agency is looking for.

You shouldn’t ever receive a text, email, or phone call from the IRS asking for personal or financial information. If you do, the IRS website offers several steps for checking out and reporting any suspicious contact .

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Reasons Why Someone May Get Audited by the IRS

Here’s a closer look at some of the typical IRS audit triggers. Knowing them can help you understand and possibly avoid the process as you work your way through tax season.

•   You’re a high earner. In 2022, the odds that a millionaire was audited by the IRS was 1.1 percent — higher than the average audit rate. If you are a high earner, it may be worthwhile to work with an experienced CPA to ensure you file precisely. You may also want to investigate ways to lower taxable income for high earners.

•   You claimed the Earned Income Tax Credit. The Earned Income Tax Credit, or EITC, is a provision that helps lower- and moderate-income workers and their families receive a tax credit. This can reduce the taxes owed or possibly increase a refund. However, research indicates that those who claim the credit are audited at a higher rate than average, perhaps because the IRS wants to be sure the credit is being used appropriately.

•   You failed to report all your income. When you are issued a W-2 form or 1099 form showing your earnings, the IRS receives a copy too. If your return doesn’t reflect the same figures that they have when they perform a cross-check, you could wind up being audited.

•   You didn’t report all of your stock trades. When you sell stock shares, the funds you receive are taxable unless the investments happen to be a retirement account that is tax-deferred. Both you and the IRS will be sent a particular kind of 1099, a Form 1099-B, reflecting activity, and you will have to report your capital gains and losses when you do your tax return. The tax rate will depend on how long you have held the investment, but it’s important that these transactions be reported and paid up when you file your return.

•   You claim large charitable contributions. If you claim tax deductions for charitable donations of cash or items, it’s important to keep records and receipts. For a donation of cash or goods worth more than $250, the IRS requires you to get a written letter of acknowledgment from the charity by the date you file your taxes. If you’ll deduct at least $500 in donated items, you need to fill out Form 8283. For any items worth more than $5,000, you must attach an appraisal of the item to the form. Large and unsubstantiated contributions can be problematic.

Recommended: Tax-Deductible or Not? Your Guide to End-of-Year Donations

•   You claim a home office. If you are self-employed, you may deduct a percent of your rent, phone bills, and other work-related costs on Schedule C of your return. Another option is to deduct $5 per square foot of space used for business, up to $1,500. However, the IRS has over the years been successful in minimizing this home office deduction on returns, especially since the home office must be for the exclusive purpose of work; it can’t double as, say, a guest room. This means it can be an audit risk to take this on your return.

•   You claim that your car is only used for business. This is another audit red flag. If you are self-employed and depreciate a car on Form 4562 and claim that it’s used for business 100% of the time, you may well be stretching the boundaries of believability. Because it’s unusual that a vehicle wouldn’t also be used for personal transportation, you may trigger an audit with this 100% figure. It can be important that tax deductions for freelancers aren’t too large versus income.

•   You accept cash transactions. If you work in the kind of business where you often get paid in cash, especially large amounts, your return may receive extra scrutiny. The IRS requires individuals and businesses to report cash transactions over the sum of $10,000. Banks must also report potentially suspicious transactions involving cash (for instance, if someone deposits $9,500 in cash one day and $700 the next, thereby skirting the $10,000 reporting threshold).

•   Your business regularly shows losses. Of course, not all businesses are always profitable. But if you’ve started an enterprise and it keeps showing losses, year after year, it might be what triggers an IRS audit. It could look as if you have established this endeavor simply as a way to benefit from some tax deductions. The same can hold true if your business is barely break-even.

Recommended: Tax Loss Carryforward

•   You claim lots of travel and entertainment deductions. What else can trigger a tax audit? Here’s another one for self-employed workers: If you claim a lot of restaurant dinners, travel, and shows as business expenses, you may raise eyebrows at the IRS. This is especially true if the meals and hotels seem more lavish than your business might otherwise qualify for. Save all your receipts and documentation, and know that a high level of these expenses being claimed on Schedule C may get some attention and even an audit.

•   You make errors on your tax return. As you prepare for tax season, you may feel overwhelmed or be in a rush. Or perhaps you’re just not the most detail-oriented person on the planet. But if you make math mistakes on your return or, say, round up numbers to the nearest $10 or $100 because you can’t be bothered with change, heads-up: You may put yourself in line for an audit. Precision and specificity do count.

Quick Money Tip: Direct deposit is the fastest way to get an IRS tax refund. More than 9 out of 10 refunds are issued in less than 21 days using this free service, plus you can track the payment and even split the funds into different bank accounts.

A Few Facts About Tax Audits

Here are a few points to be aware of on the topic of IRS tax audits. They may clarify some concerns that are on your mind.

A Compliance Contact Isn’t Always an Audit

A compliance check is a review done by the IRS to ensure that a taxpayer is adhering to the requirements for recordkeeping and information reporting. It does not relate directly to whether or not a person owes taxes.

There Are Different Types of Audits

Just as there are different kinds of taxes, so too are there different kinds of audits. If you are being audited by the IRS, there are a couple of ways this may happen. Mail audits are fairly common; in these, you mail in documents in response to specific inquiries. Office and field audits are more serious, and the IRS asks for proof of credits and deductions, and may look at your financial records more carefully to see if your tax return is correct. The IRS may be looking for tax evasion on these kinds of audits. The third kind of audit is what’s known as a CP2000 notice. Technically, this isn’t an audit but an underreporter inquiry, and is likely about a discrepancy between your return and the tax documents that were filed with them for the tax year in question.

Some Groups Face Higher Audit Rates than Others

While audit rates have dropped for all income levels, those with incomes below $25,000 and above $500,000 are audited at higher rates than the average.

Good Record Keeping May Offer Protection

If you are audited, it can be very helpful if your records are in good order. That way you can explain the amounts you reported and easily answer questions the IRS may have. This can serve as a good incentive for you to keep your records diligently going forward.

Ignoring the IRS Could Be Costly

What happens when you get audited can of course vary. But one possibility if you are audited is that you may be liable for back taxes not paid and penalties. These penalties typically accrue over time, so the longer you go without paying them, the higher they can be. That’s why it’s a good reason to respond promptly if you do get audited.

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What to Do if You Get Audited

What if you are one of those few people who is told that your returns are being reviewed? This is what to expect and what to do if you get audited by the IRS:

•   Typically, you will get a letter from the IRS in the mail that will identify an issue (such as your reporting less income than their records show you earned) and requesting a response.

•   It’s wise to gather your documents so you can make your case. It can be smart to send your reply as a clear, concise statement of what your documentation shows and share those records to help prove your point.

•   One important thing to do when you get audited is to reply in a timely manner and make sure your reply gets where it’s going. It can be a wise move to use additional mail services to ensure you have proof of delivery.

•   If you worked with a CPA or an enrolled agent on your return, they can likely advise you. If you used tax-return software, they may also offer help.

•   Your response to the mail inquiry may be enough to resolve the situation. Or the IRS may have additional questions for or requirements of documentation for you. If things escalate to a face-to-face meeting, you may want to have a tax professional work with you and accompany you for guidance and support.

•   Whether it’s a correspondence exam or an in-person audit, you’ll get a printed list of specific records the IRS wants to see. If your audit is being managed by mail, you may be able to send the documents electronically or by mail. (Be sure to get a receipt for delivery.) Note the IRS will generally accept copies and they caution against mailing original documents in. If it isn’t possible to send the documents, you can request an in-person meeting.

•   If you need more time to respond to a correspondence exam, you can fax or email a request for an extension using the contact information in your IRS letter. Or, if you’re being asked to comply with an in-person exam, you can contact the auditor assigned to your case to request an extension.

•   Also worth noting: If the IRS finds discrepancies in your return, it may review returns from up to the last six years to better assess what the situation is.

The Takeaway

No one can guarantee a return won’t be audited by the IRS — even if you aren’t doing any of the things most experts say might put you at higher risk. But if you’re honest about your income and your deductions, keep organized and complete records, take care to enter all information accurately, and double-check your work, you may be able to avoid major problems should you get audited.

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FAQ

Are audits always negative?

While IRS audits make most people sweaty-palmed, they can be as simple as answering some questions by mail. They are not necessarily as scary as you may think.

How do I know that I am being audited?

If you are being audited, you will be notified, most likely by mail, by the IRS.

What happens after an audit is conducted?

After an audit is conducted, you will be told the outcome. You may be told you owe taxes and penalties or not. If you are assessed additional taxes and fees, you can complete paperwork and pay them if you agree with the findings. If you don’t, you can contact the auditor to discuss and request a review of the findings. If necessary, the matter can be escalated to Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) or you can file an appeal with the IRS Appeals Office.


SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a deposit to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.

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How to File a Tax Extension

How to File a Tax Extension

You can file a tax extension in a few different ways, such as online or by mail. This process can help people who may need more time to finalize their return, whether they are missing documents, dealing with a personal emergency, or have other reasons for being behind schedule.

While a six-month extension can be a good safety net, it’s important to learn the facts. For instance, an extension doesn’t mean you have more time to pay any taxes you may owe.

Read on to learn the facts and important considerations to know when filing a tax extension.

What Is a Tax Extension?

A tax extension extends the deadline for filing your federal tax return by six months. All you have to do to get an extension is request one by April 15, 2024. Here are important points to know:

•   A tax extension does not give you extra time to pay any taxes owed. If you can’t afford to pay your full tax bill, it’s a good idea to pay as much as you can by Tax Day and then apply for an individual payment plan on IRS.gov or call the IRS (Internal Revenue Service) at 800-829-1040 to discuss payment options.

•   The agency may waive the late-payment penalty in a few cases, but it will not waive interest charges on unpaid tax bills. The interest rate is the federal short-term rate plus three percentage points. In early 2024, for individuals, the rate was 8%, compounded daily.

•   The late-payment penalty, aka failure-to-pay penalty (you filed for an extension on time but still owe taxes), is much less severe than the failure-to-file penalty (you didn’t file your tax return by the due date and did not request an extension). The failure-to-file penalty is usually 5% of the tax owed for each month or part of a month that your return is late, up to 25% of the total owed.

Either way, a penalty plus interest on taxes owed past the deadline might be a good incentive for many taxpayers to try to cough up most of their bill on time.

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How Do Tax Extensions Work?

There are three ways to request an automatic extension of time to file your return:

1.    File IRS Form 4868 electronically using your personal computer or through a tax professional who uses e-file. You’ll be asked to provide your prior year’s adjusted gross income for verification purposes. (If you do not know your prior year’s AGI and do not have a copy of that tax return, you can find the information by signing in to your IRS online account.)

2.    Mail a paper Form 4868. (The IRS says, though, not to mail in Form 4868 if you file electronically unless you’re making a payment with a check or money order.)

3.    Pay all or part of your estimated income tax due, and indicate that the payment is for an extension, using Direct Pay or the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System. You can also pay taxes with a credit card or debit card.

Special rules about filing extensions may apply to those serving in a combat zone or a qualified hazardous duty area or living outside the United States.

Recommended: Tax Season 2024 Help Center

Reasons to File for a Tax Extension

Many high earners routinely seek tax extensions because their business dealings and investments can take longer to sort out.
Other people might seek a tax extension for different reasons, such as:

•   Needing extra time to track down missing tax documents, especially if you’re dealing with an extenuating circumstance (for instance, the closure of a place of employment shortly before tax documents were due to be issued).

•   A major unplanned life event interrupts your plans and makes it hard to get things together on time.

•   You’re still figuring out how to do taxes as a freelancer and want to take all the deductions you can.

•   You’re going to take the home office tax deduction as a self-employed person and want to carefully crunch the numbers because you’re skipping the simplified deduction of up to $1,500.

•   General life busyness led to the deadline sneaking up on you.

•   Maybe you’re filing taxes for the first time and you simply procrastinated.

•   You have a primary and second home and are still unsure whether to itemize and take the mortgage interest deduction.

Filing for a Tax Extension Online

Remember, you don’t need to file Form 4868 if you make a payment using IRS electronic payment options or by phone and indicate that you want an extension.

If you do need to file Form 4868, you can do so electronically by accessing the IRS e-file with your tax software or by using a tax professional who uses e-file.

IRS e-file options include Free File, which lets you prepare and file your federal income tax online using guided tax preparation at an IRS partner site (for filers with AGI of $73,000 or less) or Free File fillable forms (for any income level).

Filing for a Tax Extension by Mail

You can simply download and print Form 4868 from IRS.gov, fill it out, and mail it in, along with a check for estimated income taxes owed.

The form itself includes information about where to send the document, depending on where you live.

Recommended: Steps to Prepare for Tax Season

Can I File for a Tax Extension If I Owe Money?

Yes, you can still file for a tax return extension if you owe the government money — but the money itself is still due on the original due date.

Unfortunately, there’s no way to file for an extension of taxes owed. Rather, your best bet is to pay as much of your estimated taxes as you can when you file for the extension, and then apply for a payment plan online or call the IRS to learn about your options for complete repayment.

Can Someone Be Denied a Tax Extension?

Yes, but it’s uncommon. If your tax extension was denied, it was probably because of a mistake in your personal information on Form 4868.

You can resubmit your request and make sure to enter your current address, name, and Social Security number correctly.

How to Know If You Owe Taxes

While self-employed individuals must estimate their taxes and pay on a quarterly basis, those who file using
W-2 wage reports may not do this kind of taxation math.

There are several easy ways to find out if you owe Uncle Sam.

•   You may receive a notice in the mail from the IRS, but ensure that it’s official correspondence and not a note from a scammer. The IRS will never email, text, or reach out to individuals via social media.

•   “Your Online Account” on IRS.gov allows you to see how much you owe in taxes. This user profile also allows you to pay any owed taxes directly.

•   You can always call the IRS at 800-829-1040 to confirm any amount of back taxes you might owe.

The Takeaway

Is it hard to file a tax extension? Not really. What may prove difficult is paying all taxes owed by the filing deadline (aka Tax Day) or paying a balance still owed plus a penalty and interest after the April date to file taxes.

It’s important to have a handle on your tax status and tax bill as April 15th arrives. It’s also wise to have a good banking partner and accounts that allow easy payment of any money you owe or refunds you receive.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.

Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall. Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

How do I know if I’ve been approved for a tax extension?

Extension requests are rarely denied, but news of a denial would come by email. In the event of an error in an address or name, a taxpayer will be given a few days to remedy the error and file a tax extension again. Usually, you can get an automatic extension of time to file your tax return by filing Form 4868 electronically. You’ll receive an electronic acknowledgment of your request.

Is there a fee to file for a tax extension?

No. Filing for a tax extension is free.

Is the process for filing a tax extension easy?

Yes. You simply submit Form 4868 electronically or by mail before the filing deadline, or make a tax payment through approved methods and indicate you want an extension of time to file your federal return.

What happens if I file my taxes late and without an extension?

If you don’t pay your tax balance by the filing deadline and you did not file for an extension, you’ll get hit with a failure-to-file penalty (in most cases) and interest. Interest also compounds daily on any unpaid tax from the due date of the return until the date of payment in full.


Photo credit: iStock/Delmaine Donson

SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a deposit to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

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colorful credit cards

Paying Off $10,000 of Credit Card Debt

If you’re like many Americans, you may carry thousands of dollars of credit card debt. One recent analysis found that the average citizen has $7,951 in debt. While getting out from under debt may seem daunting, there are ways to make it manageable.

Here’s a look at different strategies for paying off a large chunk of debt; specifically, $10,000. In addition to tactics for eliminating debt, you’ll learn why doing so is important, which can help boost your motivation.

Why Paying off Credit Card Debt is Important

In an ideal world, you would pay off your credit card every month in full. If you’re able to do that, using a credit card (responsibly) can be a good thing. It’s actually a pretty useful way to build credit and gain credit card rewards.

However, when you start to carry monthly credit card debt, things can get a bit dicey, because you’ll start to pay interest.

When you signed up for your credit card, you probably noticed that it came with an annual percentage rate (APR). The APR includes not only the approximate percentage of interest that you’ll likely pay on your credit card balance, but also fees associated with your credit card, such as origination fees or balance transfer fees.

Even if you make minimum payments, interest will still accrue on the balance you owe. The more money you owe, the quicker your interest payments can add up and the harder your debt can be to pay off. The fact that credit cards typically charge high interest rates (the current average interest rate is almost 25% at the end of 2023) is part of what you’re grappling with.

So strategies that help you pay down debt as fast as you can also might help you control your interest rates. That, in turn, can help keep your debt from getting ahead of you.

To illustrate some of the debt-demolishing tips in this article, the nice round number of $10,000 is being used. But everyone’s debt totals will be different, and the right ways to pay down debt will be different for everyone as well. It’s up to you to find the path that’s best for your needs.


💡 Quick Tip: Some personal loan lenders can release your funds as quickly as the same day your loan is approved.

Avoiding Adding to Your Debt

If tackling $10,000 in credit card debt, or really any amount of credit card debt, the very first step might be to stop using credit cards altogether. This can be tough, especially if you’re used to using them all the time. But if you keep spending on your card, you’ll be adding to your debt. While you get your debt under control, you could consider switching over to only using cash or your debit card.

Building a Budget

Making a budget may help you find extra cash to help you pay down your credit cards. You can start by making a list of all your necessary expenses, including housing, utilities, transportation, insurance, and groceries.

It’s usually a good idea to include minimum credit card payments in this category as well, since making minimum payments can at least keep you from having to pay additional penalties and fees on top of your credit card balance and interest payments.

You can tally up the cost of your necessary expenses and subtract the total from your income. What’s left is the money available for discretionary spending, or in other words, the money you’d use for savings, eating out, entertainment, etc. Look for discretionary expenses you can cut — you might forgo a vacation or start cooking more — so you can direct extra money to paying down your credit card.

Consider using any extra windfalls — such as a bonus at work, a tax refund, or a cash birthday gift — to help you pay down your debt as well.

Though it may seem frustrating to cut out activities you enjoy doing, it can be helpful to remember that these cuts are likely temporary. As soon as you pay off your cards, you can add reasonable discretionary expenditures back into your budget.

The Debt Avalanche Method

Once you’ve identified the money you’ll use to pay off your cards, there are a couple of strategies that may be worth considering to help organize your payments. If you have multiple credit cards that each carry a balance, you could consider the debt avalanche method. The first step when using this strategy is to order your credit card debts from the highest interest rate to the lowest.

From there, you’d make minimum payments on all of your cards to avoid additional penalties and fees. Then, you could direct extra payments to the card with the highest interest rates first. When that card is paid off, you’d focus on the next highest card and so on until you’d paid off all of your debt.

The idea here is that higher interest rates end up costing you more money over the long run, so clearing the highest rates saves you cash and accelerates your ability to pay off your other debts.

The Debt Snowball Method

Another strategy potentially worth considering if you have multiple credit cards is the snowball method. With this method, you’d order your debts from smallest to largest balance. You would then make minimum payments on all of your cards here as well, but direct any extra payments to paying off the smallest balance first.

Once that’s done, you’d move on to the card with the next lowest balance, continuing this process until you have all of your cards paid off. By paying off your smallest debt you get an immediate win. Ideally, this small win would help you build momentum and stay motivated to keep going.

The drawback of this method is you continue making interest payments on your highest rate loans. So you may actually end up spending more money on interest using this method than you would using the avalanche method.

Only you know what type of motivation works best for you. If the sense of accomplishment you feel from paying off your small balances will help inspire you to actually pay your debt off, then this method may be the right choice for you.

Consolidate Your Debt

Interest rates on credit cards can be hefty to say the least. Personal loans can help you rein in your credit card debt by consolidating it with a potentially lower interest rate. With a personal loan, you can consolidate all of your credit cards into one loan, instead of managing multiple credit card payments.

Once you’ve used your personal loan to consolidate your credit card debt, you’ll still be responsible for paying off the loan. However, you’ll no longer have to juggle multiple debts. And hopefully, with a lower interest rate and shorter term, you’ll actually be able to pay your debt off faster.

Paying Off Credit Card Debt With a Personal Loan

If you think a personal loan could be a good way for you to pay off $10,000 of credit card debt, see what SoFi offers.

Think twice before turning to high-interest credit cards. Consider a SoFi personal loan instead. SoFi offers competitive fixed rates and same-day funding. Checking your rate takes just a minute.


SoFi’s Personal Loan was named NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Personal Loan overall.


SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s website .

Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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How Long Does It Take to Repair Credit?

Negative marks can stay on your credit report for seven or even 10 years. But if you are having trouble managing your finances, don’t panic.

Many people hit a moment at some point when they miss a payment or pay bills late. Or perhaps they face mounting credit card debt or the prospect of foreclosure. If you are grappling with any of these situations, you may wonder how long your credit report will reflect these issues.

While seven years is a typical time period for events to stay on your report and potentially impact your credit score, the time period could be considerably shorter. And as time passes, the effect of these “bad marks” will typically diminish.

Read on to learn more about what can lower your credit score, how long it can take to bounce back, and ways to manage your money responsibly, which can help build your score.

Factors that Can Influence Your Credit Score & Report

A credit score gives a numerical value to a person’s credit history. It can help give lenders a big-picture look at a potential borrower’s creditworthiness. These scores (there isn’t just one) give lenders insight into how reliable a person might be when it comes to repaying their debt.

This can influence a lender’s decision on whether or not to loan a person money, how much money they are willing to lend, and the rates and terms for which a borrower qualifies.

Since credit scores are so widely used, it’s easy to see why some individuals may be interested in improving their credit scores. First, it might be helpful to understand the factors used to actually determine your score. Here’s a snapshot of what goes into a FICO® Score, since that is the credit score used by many lenders right now.

•   Your payment history accounts for approximately 35% of your FICO Score, making it one of the most influential factors. Even just one missed or late payment could potentially lower a person’s credit score.

•   Credit utilization ratio accounts for 30% of your score. Credit utilization ratio is your total revolving debt in comparison to your total available revolving credit limit. A low credit utilization ratio can indicate to lenders that you are effectively managing your credit. Typically, lenders like to see a credit utilization ratio that is less than 30%.

•   The length of your credit history counts for 15%, and that may be a good reason not to close an account that you use infrequently. It might help add to the length of your history.

•   Your credit mix accounts for 10% of your score. While not a good reason to go out and open a new line of credit, the bureaus do tend to prefer to see a mix of accounts vs. just one kind of credit.

•   The last component, also at 10%, is new credit, meaning are you currently making a lot of requests for credit. The number of hard credit inquiries in your name could make it look as if you are at risk of financial instability and are seeking ways to pay for goods and services.



💡 Quick Tip: Some personal loan lenders can release your funds as quickly as the same day your loan is approved.

Credit Issues: How Long Do They Linger?

Negative factors like late payments and foreclosures can hang around on your credit report for a while. Generally, the information is included for around seven years.

Bankruptcy is an exception to this seven year guideline—it can linger on your credit report for up to 10 years, depending on the type of bankruptcy filed. Bankruptcies filed under Chapter 7 can be reported for up to 10 years from the filing date. Bankruptcies filed under Chapter 13 can be reported for seven.

While a late payment will be listed on a credit report for seven years, as time passes it typically has less of an impact. So if you missed a payment last month, it will have more of an effect on your score than if you missed a payment four years ago.

These numbers are important to know when you are working to build your credit.

How Long Does It Take For Your Credit Score to Go Up?

Here’s a look, in chart form, at how long it takes for different negative factors to drop off your credit report.

Factor

Typical credit score recovery time

Bankruptcy 7-10 years
Late payment Up to 7 years
Home foreclosure Up to 7 years
Closing a credit card account 3 months or longer
Maxing out a credit card account 3 months or longer, depending on how quickly you repay your debt
Applying for a new credit card 3 months typically

Disputing an Error on Your Credit Report

Checking your credit report can help you stay on top of your credit. You’ll also be able to make sure the information is correct, and if needed, dispute any mistakes. There could, for instance, be a bill you paid long ago on your report as unpaid, or perhaps account details belonging to someone else with a similar name erroneously wound up on your report.

There are three major credit bureaus — Equifax®, Experian®, and TransUnion®. Once a year you can request a copy of your credit report from each of the three credit bureaus, at no cost. You can visit AnnualCreditReport.com to learn more. Checking in with each report may feel a little repetitive, but it’s possible that the credit bureaus could have slightly different information on file.

If you find that there are discrepancies or errors, you can dispute the mistake. You’ll have to write to each credit bureau individually. Generally, you’ll need to send in documentation to support your claim. Once you’ve submitted your dispute letter, the bureaus typically have 30 days to respond.

It’s possible that a bureau will require additional supporting documentation, which can lead to some back and forth within or sometimes after the 30 days. It could take anywhere from three to six months to resolve a credit dispute, though some of these situations will take more or less time depending on complexity.

Staying on Top of Efforts to Build Credit

Sometimes, resolving issues on a credit report isn’t enough to build a bad credit score. On the bright side, credit scores aren’t permanent. Here are a few ideas for helping you to build your credit.

Improve Account Management

If you’re struggling to keep up with accounts with a variety of financial institutions, it could be time to simplify. Take stock of your investments, debts, credit cards, and savings or checking accounts. Is there any opportunity to consolidate?

Having your accounts in one, easy-to-check location can make it simpler to ensure you never miss an alert or important deadline. Automating your finances and using your bank’s app to regularly check in with your accounts (say, a few times a week can be a good cadence) can make good money sense as well, helping you keep on top of payment deadlines and when your balance might be getting low.


💡 Quick Tip: Swap high-interest debt for a lower-interest loan, and save money on your monthly payments. Find out why credit card consolidation loans are so popular.

Make Payments On-Time

Did you know that your payment history (as in, do you pay on time) is the single largest factor in determining your credit score? Lenders can be hesitant to lend money to people with a history of late payments. So make sure you’re aware of each bill’s due date and make your payments on time. One idea? As mentioned above, you could set up autopay so you don’t even have to think about it.

Limit Credit Utilization Ratio

It could help to set a realistic budget that leads to a fair credit utilization ratio, meaning that your credit balances aren’t too high in relation to your credit limit. Some accounts will let you set up balance alerts that can warn you as you inch closer to the 30% guideline of the maximum you want to reach. Another option could be paying your credit card bill more frequently (for example, setting up a mid-cycle payment in addition to your regular payment).

Stratege to Destroy Debt

When it comes to paying off debt, having a plan can help. For example, using a credit card can be an effective way to build your credit history, but if not used responsibly, credit card debt can be incredibly difficult to pay off.

Not only that, it could end up impacting your credit score (say, if your credit utilization ratio creeps up above 30%, as noted above). As a part of your plan to build your credit after negative factors have occurred, you might consider putting a debt repayment plan into place.

Your finances and personal situation will be a major factor in the debt payoff plan that works best for you. If you need some inspiration, the methods below may be helpful to reference in your quest to pay off debt. If you decide that one of these options works for you, here’s how you might go about them.

The Snowball

The snowball method of paying off debt is pretty straightforward.

•   To put it into action, you would organize your debts from smallest to largest, without factoring in the interest rates.

•   Then you’d continue to make the minimum payments on all of your debts while paying as much as possible on your smallest debt.

•   When the smallest debt is paid off, you’d then roll that money into debt payments for the next smallest debt — until all of your debt is repaid.

This strategy is all about changing behavior and building in incentives to help keep you going. Starting with the smallest debt means you’d see the reward of paying it off faster than if you had started with the larger debt. While this method can help keep you motivated and laser-focused on eliminating your debt, it isn’t always the most cost effective, since it doesn’t take into account interest rates.

The Avalanche

The debt avalanche method encourages you to focus on your highest-interest debts first.

•   Prioritize debts with the highest interest rates by putting any extra cash towards them.

•   Continue to make the minimum payments on all of your other debts.

This technique could help save money in interest in the long run. And it could even help you pay off your debts sooner than the snowball method.

The Fireball

The fireball method combines the snowball and avalanche methods in a hybrid approach designed to help you blaze through costly debt so you can focus on the things that matter most to you.

•   The first step in this method is to go through all of your debts and categorize them as either “good” or “bad.”

•   “Good” debts are those that tend to contribute to your financial growth and net worth; they also tend to have relatively lower interest rates. Good debt might be a student loan that helps you launch your career or a mortgage that allows you to own a home.

•   Debts with high interest rates that don’t go towards building wealth (such as credit card debt) are often considered “bad.” With this method, you can list your “bad” debts from the smallest amount to the largest amount.

•   Then you’d take a look at your budget and see how much money you have to funnel toward making extra debt payments. While making the minimum monthly payment on all outstanding debts, you’d direct the extra funds toward the bad debt with the smallest amount due.

•   When that smallest balance is repaid in full, you’d apply the total amount you were paying on that debt to the next smallest debt. Then you’d continue this pattern, moving through each outstanding bad debt until they are all paid in full.

An important note: While you are moving through your higher-interest debts, you would still follow the normal payment schedule on your lower-interest debts.

By focusing on the debts with the highest interest rates first, this method could save you some change when compared with the snowball method. And, since you’re then targeting bad debt from the smallest balance to the largest, you could still benefit from the same psychological boost as you see your debt shrink, one payment at a time.

Create a Goals-Based Approach

Having financial goals could possibly help you streamline your efforts. If you’re actively working toward saving for, say, a down payment, you may feel less inclined to spend money elsewhere.

You could try setting short-term, mid-term, and long-term goals. In the short-term your goals might be as simple as tracking your spending and setting up a budget. Or perhaps saving for a big vacation that’s a year or so away. For mid-term goals, you might think about something a little further out, like buying a house or saving for a child’s education. Long-term goals are often things like (you guessed it) saving for retirement.

Writing down your goals and setting a time for when you’d like to reach them can help you set up your plan.

Consolidate Your Debt

If you are working on building your credit and want to pay down your credit card balances, one option could be a personal loan to consolidate that high-interest debt.

Think twice before turning to high-interest credit cards. Consider a SoFi personal loan instead. SoFi offers competitive fixed rates and same-day funding. Checking your rate takes just a minute.


SoFi’s Personal Loan was named NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Personal Loan overall.


SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s website .

Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.


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Is Credit Monitoring Worth It?

It’s no secret that identity theft has been an issue for consumers. In 2022, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) received 1.1 million identity theft reports, and a similar number of complaints are expected in 2023. The financial toll of online fraud, which includes identity theft, can be substantial. The FTC estimates that it cost Americans $8.8 billion in 2022, with median losses around $650.

One tool that can help detect issues early on is credit monitoring. This service tracks your accounts and alerts you to any changes or suspicious activity, giving you time to start the process of undoing any damage that’s been done.

If you were involved in a data breach, you may receive credit monitoring at no cost. Otherwise, you can pay a nominal fee for the coverage — usually around $10 to $30 a month — or do most of the legwork yourself for free.

Why Is It Important to Monitor Your Credit?

Your credit history can have an impact on your ability to make big financial decisions, like purchasing a home or buying a new (or new-to-you) car.

If you have a spotless report, you could get better interest rates on new loans. On the other hand, if your score is what’s considered poor, you could be denied access to certain financial products altogether.

Even if you’re diligent about abiding by best credit practices, if someone has unauthorized use of your information, they can quickly sink your hard-earned credit score. That’s when credit monitoring comes in handy. If you see an alert corresponding to a change you didn’t make, you’ll know something’s up — and you can move quickly to repair any issues that might impact your creditworthiness.

Generally speaking, it’s a good idea to check your credit reports at least once a year. If you’re making a major purchase, consider monitor your credit for at least three months beforehand to ensure everything is in order.


💡 Quick Tip: Your credit score updates every 30-45 days. Free credit monitoring can help you learn about your score’s normal ups and downs — and when a dip is cause for concern.

Pros vs Cons of Credit Monitoring Services

Credit monitoring can be a useful tool, but there are some drawbacks you’ll want to consider. Here are pros and cons of credit monitoring services.

Pros of Credit Monitoring Services

Many credit monitoring services come with extra features that might help justify their cost. Common examples include:

•   Alerts when there are changes to your personal information, significant balance changes, account closures, or hard inquiries

•   Access to credit reports and scores from one or more of the three major credit bureaus

•   Dark web scans, which checks if your personal information has been compromised

•   Identity theft insurance, which can cover any costs you may incur as you’re dealing with identity theft

•   Identity recovery services, which can be useful as you repair any damage from identity theft

Cons of Credit Monitoring Service

Even the best credit monitoring service has its limits. Here are some potential drawbacks to consider:

•   Cost of a subscription

•   Can’t provide 100% protection from all fraud or identity theft

•   Can’t fix inaccuracies on your credit report (you’ll need to handle that)

•   Coverage may not include monitoring from all three major credit bureaus: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax

•   You may not be alerted if someone uses your name to collect a tax refund or claim benefits from Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, or unemployment insurance

How to Monitor Credit for Free

There are times when paying for a credit monitoring service makes sense. For example, you want more robust identity monitoring, prefer a program that monitors reports from the credit bureaus, or need help resolving disputes. It may also be a good move if you suspect your information has been exposed.

But it’s possible to do the job yourself (and avoid paying a subscription fee). Here’s how:

Request a Free Credit Report

By law, you’re entitled to a free credit report every 12 months from each of the three credit bureaus. Visit annualcreditreport.com to get started. While you can ask for the reports at any time, spacing out your requests every few months allows you to keep an eye on your accounts throughout the year.

Find Out If You’re Already Getting Coverage

Some accounts include some level of complimentary credit monitoring, so it’s worth a call to your bank or credit card company to find out if you qualify.

Put a Freeze on Your Credit Reports

There are instances when freezing your credit report might be a good move, such as when you believe your data has been breached or if your Social Security number or other sensitive information was stolen or made public.

A credit freeze allows only a limited number of entities to view your credit reports. This means the credit bureaus can’t provide your personal amount to new lenders, credit card companies, landlords, or hiring managers. While this freezes the renting, hiring, and lending process, it also prevents thieves from stealing your identity and opening a new account in your name.

There’s no charge to freeze or unfreeze your credit, and your credit score won’t be affected.

Request a Fraud Alert

If you think you may be the victim of fraud or identity theft, you may want to consider placing a fraud alert on your credit report. Once a fraud alert is placed, you’ll be asked to provide your phone number, which creditors will use to verify your identity whenever an application for credit is made.

There’s no charge to make the request with the credit bureaus, and the alert is active for one year. It has no impact on your credit score.


💡 Quick Tip: What is credit monitoring good for? For one, maintaining a high credit score can translate to lower interest rates on loans and credit card offers with more perks.

The Takeaway

Credit monitoring services can act like a watchdog over your accounts, flagging suspicious activity or changes so you can move quickly to correct inaccuracies or do damage control. You can take a DIY approach to keeping track of your accounts, which can include requesting a free credit report every year from the three credit bureaus. But if you’ve been the victim of identity theft or fraud — or need more robust monitoring — you may want to consider paying for a credit monitoring service.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.

SoFi helps you stay on top of your finances.


SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s website .

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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