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Advance/Decline Line: Definition, Formula, Examples

By Paulina Likos · December 18, 2021 · 6 minute read

We’re here to help! First and foremost, SoFi Learn strives to be a beneficial resource to you as you navigate your financial journey. Read more We develop content that covers a variety of financial topics. Sometimes, that content may include information about products, features, or services that SoFi does not provide. We aim to break down complicated concepts, loop you in on the latest trends, and keep you up-to-date on the stuff you can use to help get your money right. Read less

Advance/Decline Line: Definition, Formula, Examples

The Advance/Decline line, or A/D line, is a technical stock market indicator used by traders to measure the overall health of the stock market. This measurement tells market participants whether there are more stocks rising or falling on a trading day, and whether a majority of stocks are pushing the market in either direction.

For traders who are looking for greater insight into market trend analysis, the A/D line may be a suitable indicator to help determine where the market is trending, how strong that trend is, and the direction the market could be going in the short-term.

What Is the Advance/Decline Line (A/D)?

The advance/decline line (A/D) is a market indicator that traders use during stock technical analysis to estimate the breadth, or the overall strength or weakness of the stock market. The A/D line monitors how many stocks are currently trading above or below the previous day’s close. Traders may follow these changes over time to try to forecast the direction of the market.

In a particular index, like the S&P 500, Nasdaq, or Dow Jones Industrial Average, stocks go up and down. But just because some stocks move in one direction, it doesn’t mean that all stocks move in that same direction. Sometimes it can be difficult for investors to discern whether the direction of the market is being influenced by larger stocks that hold more weight in an index, or by a majority of stocks that are pushing the markets in a particular direction.

The purpose of the A/D line is to see how it correlates with the price movement of the index it’s being compared to. Traders and investors can use the A/D line to see how many stocks are rising or declining to form an estimate on market direction.

Where Is the Advance/Decline Line on a Chart?

Market participants can find the advance/decline line above or below a stock index chart. Investors can reference the A/D line and compare it to the chart stock market indexes to better understand the strength of the market and to help gauge the direction of where the market might be headed.

Recommended: How to Read Stock Charts as a New Trader

Advance/Decline Line vs the Arms Index

The Arms Index — also known as the story-term trading index (TRIN) — is another technical analysis indicator used to estimate market sentiment and measure volatility. It’s a ratio between advancing and declining stocks versus the volume of stocks whose price increases or decreases. In other words, the TRIN compares advancing and declining stocks to their volume and shows whether the volume is flowing toward advancing or declining stocks.

If more volume is trending toward declining stocks, the TRIN for that day will be greater than one. If more A/D volume correlates with advancing stocks, then the TRIN will be below one for that day. A high TRIN reading could signal to traders that stock selling may be on the horizon. A TRIN reading below one could indicate a buying opportunity.

Traders may use the TRIN ratio as a short-term market gauge to measure overbought or oversold market levels, while the A/D line can be used to gauge longer term market sentiment by measuring the rise and fall of stock over a period of time.

Advance/Decline Line Formula

The A/D Line is calculated by taking the difference between the number of stocks that advance and the number of stocks that decline, compared to the prior close. This value is added to the previous day’s A/D Line value. If there are more declining stocks versus advancing stocks on a particular day, then traders will see the A/D line start to move downward. If there are more stocks that are advancing, the A/D number is going to be increasing. Here is the formula:

Advance/Decline Line = Number of advancing stocks – Number of declining stocks + Previous A/D Line value

Calculating the Advance/Decline Line (A/D)

The A/D line is a cumulative, daily calculation that is plotted each day so market participants can see the direction of where stocks are moving. When reading the A/D line, it’s important for traders to look at the direction of the line and not its value.

Traders may use the A/D line to help decide which trades to place next. For example, if the market shows more declining stocks than advancing stocks, this means a majority of stocks closed at a lesser value than their previous day close. As a result, traders may anticipate that the market will fall in the near term, and may choose to sell because the market trend is moving in a bearish direction.

Some indexes, like the S&P 500, are market-cap weighted, which means the larger companies hosted in the index influence the direction of the index. The A/D line allows investors to look at stocks on a level playing field. When a market rises, for example, the A/D line shows investors whether this rise was driven by a majority of stocks increasing or if the rise was caused by a select few of stocks that hold a larger weight in the index.

What Does the Advance/Decline Line Show?

The advance/decline line shows traders the degree of participation of stocks in a market that is either rising or falling and whether the majority of stocks are moving in a similar direction of the market.

The line is a representation of stocks that are ticking up or down cumulatively, adding stock movements each day to see the trend of advancing stocks vs. declining stocks. If there were more declining stocks than advancing stocks on a particular day, the A/D line would start to slope downward. If there were more advancing stocks than declining stocks on the day, then the A/D line would slope upwards.

Sometimes there might be a difference in direction between the index and the A/D line. This is called a divergence, and it can happen in one of two ways.

Bearish Divergence: Declining Line

If the index is on an upward trend but the A/D line has a negative slope, this is known as a bearish divergence. The increase in the index may be driven by some stocks, but this scenario signals to traders the market may reverse and trend downward in the short term.

Bullish Divergence: Rising Line

If the index is on a downward trend but the A/D line has a positive slope, this is called a bullish divergence. The index seems to be bearish, but the A/D line tells market participants there are more advancing than declining stocks during the period that the index is declining. This may signal a trend reversal in market prices and indicate the market has more strength than meets the eye.

Example of Using the A/D Line

Traders use the A/D line to compare it to the price movement of the index.

For example, when an index you’re monitoring is moving to new highs, you want to see the A/D line moving new highs to confirm the index’s direction.

If the index and the A/D line are both hitting new highs, the market is hitting a bullish trend. If the stock market reaches a new peak but the A/D line reaches a lower peak than the previous rally, that means fewer stocks are participating in a higher move and the rally could be coming to an end. This could suggest that the strength of the market is driven by a few names with larger market caps.

Is the A/D Line a Good Indicator?

The A/D line is considered a reputable and popular measurement for traders to gather reliable insight into the strength of a market trend. When the price of an asset changes, traders will want to know whether it’s best to buy or sell. With the A/D line, traders can estimate price trends of assets and potential reversals by reviewing the direction of the A/D line, which is considered to be a reasonably reliable indicator in predicting trends since it shows market participants how the market is behaving.

Pros of the A/D Line

Traders can find the A/D Line indicator either above or below a stock chart on a trading platform and may use it as a tool to try to time the market and potentially catch a particular stock price.

By gauging the direction of where markets are headed, the A/D Line can help traders forecast stock price movements on the upside or downside. This may help market participants position their trades favorably.

Cons of the A/D Line

It’s important for market participants to be careful to not rely on the A/D Line as their only market indicator. While the A/D Line offers insight into overall market direction, it may not be able to capture minor market changes.

The A/D Line does not capture price changes between trading gaps, or when a stock’s price moves higher or lower throughout the trading day even though there’s not much trading going on.

Another limitation is that even though the line shows the general direction of where the market is trending, either a positive or negative slope, the A/D line doesn’t show the precise percentage the stock moved.

How Investors Can Use the Advance/Decline Line

The A/D line is positioned against an index to help spot market trends and reversals. Traders who trade on the major indexes can use the A/D line to gauge overall market sentiment. Market participants can look at a historical A/D line to see how the market performed in different periods of time.

The Takeaway

The Advance/Decline Line is a tool used by traders and investors to forecast the direction of where the overall stock market is headed. The A/D Line is a well-known market indicator used to predict and confirm trends and forecast market reversals.

The A/D Line offers a great visual guide that may help traders make decisions on market strategies and positions in the short term. But while there are benefits of using this metric, it’s important for market participants to know the A/D line’s drawbacks as well.

Investors typically have many tools at their disposal when trading stocks, in order to be well informed. With a SoFi Invest® brokerage account, investors get access to stock market data, the latest investing news, and more — all at their fingertips — making it simple to trade stocks, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), cryptocurrency, and Initial Public Offerings (IPOs).

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Photo credit: iStock/utah778


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