Applying for a $20,000 Personal Loan in 2022

Applying for a $20,000 Personal Loan

You’ll likely need a credit score in the Good range (670 to 739) or higher to qualify for a $20,000 personal loan with a competitive interest rate. If your credit rating is Poor or even on the lower end of Fair, you may have difficulty getting approved for a personal loan.

Personal loans offer relatively low interest rates compared with other options, such as high-interest credit cards. Ultimately, the interest rate will depend on the size of your loan, the term, and your credit score.

Here’s a closer look at what it takes to apply for a personal loan this year.

Can I Get a $20,000 Personal Loan with Bad Credit?

Your credit score helps banks understand your history of managing debt. A high score suggests that you have a history of paying your bills on time while managing multiple accounts. As a result, banks see borrowers with high scores as at relatively low risk of default. Therefore, they may offer these borrowers better terms and interest rates on loans.

Lenders see borrowers with low scores as risky. To compensate for this risk, they may charge higher interest rates, if they offer a loan at all. It may be more difficult for those with bad credit to find a $20,000 personal loan, or to find one they can afford.

What Is the Typical Credit Score Required for a $20,000 Personal Loan?

When applying for a loan, a FICO® credit score in the Good range (670 to 739) or higher will help you qualify for loans with better interest rates from a wider variety of lenders.

If you have Poor credit (a FICO score of 300 to 579), or even in the low end of the Fair range (580 to 669), you may have difficulty getting approved for a personal loan.

If this is the case, all is not lost. You can work to raise your credit score by paying down debts and making sure to always make payments on time.

What Can You Use a $20,000 Personal Loan for?

A personal loan is money that you borrow from a bank, credit union, or online lender that you pay back in regular installments with interest, usually over about two to seven years. One feature of personal loans is the flexibility it provides borrowers in how they can spend their funds. Here are a few common options:

Debt Consolidation

Debt consolidation is one of the most popular uses for personal loans. If your current debt carries high interest rates, you may be able to pay it off in one fell swoop, combining all of your debt under a lower interest rate. Consolidating confers a number of advantages, including saving money in interest and replacing several debts with just one payment, which may be easier to keep track of and pay off on time.

If you consolidate credit cards, be wary of running up more debt on your cards while you pay off your personal loans. You don’t want to increase the amount of debt you’ve taken on.

Medical Expenses

If you’ve had an accident or unexpected illness, and you find yourself with growing medical bills, you may consider a personal loan to help you get them under control. Medical bills can be extremely pricey, so before committing to a loan, see if there is a way to negotiate the price down.

You may also be able to negotiate a payment plan that allows you to pay off your bill in installments, which might be more manageable and wouldn’t require taking out a loan that saddles you with interest payments.

Home Improvements

Borrowing money for home improvements is sometimes necessary and smart. For example, repairing a leaking roof in a timely manner can help prevent further damage to your home, which could cause pricier repairs down the road. In some cases, improvements or remodels can increase the value of your home.

That said, beware of taking out loans for home improvements that are simply “wants.” For example, it may not be prudent to borrow money to install a hot tub.

Funeral Expenses

In 2021, the median cost of a funeral was approximately $7,848, according to the National Funeral Directors Association. Personal loans may be an option for those who can’t afford to pay these expenses out-of-pocket.

Vacation Expenses

You can use a personal loan to pay for anything, but should you? The answer is likely no. When it comes to discretionary spending, like vacations, consider saving up money from your paycheck to cover the cost. Otherwise, because you’re paying interest, your vacation could end up costing you a lot more than the sticker price.

What’s more, if you miss a payment, you’ll be putting your credit score in jeopardy, which may not be worth it for a few days of fun in the sun.

Recommended: 11 Types of Personal Loans

Applying for a $20,000 Personal Loan

To secure your money, you’ll need to get approved for a personal loan. Once you know how much you want to borrow, you may consider getting prequalified for a loan. Lenders will ask you to provide basic information, including your address, income, and Social Security number. They may then perform a soft credit check that won’t hurt your credit score.

Finally, they’ll offer you a prequalified quote, including how much money you qualify to borrow, your monthly payment, and your interest rate. You can use this process to shop around with a few lenders to secure the best quote.

Once you’ve decided which lender to go with, you’ll submit an application. You’ll need to provide proof of income, address, and employment, and you’ll need to submit to a hard credit check.

Recommended: Personal Loan Calculator

Applying for Other Small Loan Amounts

If you don’t qualify for a $20,000 personal loan that you can afford based on your credit, you might consider taking out a smaller loan, such as a $3,000, $5,000, $10,000, or $15,000 personal loan. Smaller loans present less risk to lenders, so you may be able to qualify with a lower score.

The Takeaway

To get the best terms and interest rate for a $20,000 personal loan, you’ll likely need a Good credit score (670 to 739). But no matter your score, shop around and consider using prequalification to find the loan that’s best for you.

Consider personal loans from SoFi, which have no fees and offer low rates for loans of $5,000 to $100,000. Borrowers can receive funds as quickly as the same day their loan is approved.

Compared with high-interest credit cards, a SoFi Personal Loan is simply better debt.

FAQ

What credit score is needed for a $20,000 personal loan?

To access personal loans from a broad array of lenders offering the best interest rates, you’ll need a credit score of at least 670.

Where can I get a $20,000 loan with bad credit?

Some lenders may offer you a personal loan if you have bad credit. However, they may charge much higher interest rates.

What’s the monthly payment on a $20,000 personal loan?

Your monthly payment will depend on the term you choose and your interest rate. Typically, shorter terms will carry higher monthly payments and lower interest rates, while longer terms will have smaller monthly payments and higher interest rates.


Photo credit: iStock/AsiaVision

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s website .

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How Does a Subprime Personal Loan Work?

How Does a Subprime Personal Loan Work?

Subprime personal loans provide financing to people with poor credit who cannot qualify for a conventional prime-rate loan. Borrowers who have poor credit have a higher risk of defaulting on loans, so lenders protect themselves by adding charges to the loans. These charges come in the form of higher interest rates, longer term lengths, and higher financing fees.

Read on to learn how subprime personal loans work, the different types of loans, some alternatives to these high-interest loans, and whether they might be an option for you.

What Is a Subprime Personal Loan?

A subprime personal loan is a loan that caters to borrowers with subprime credit, who are considered to be at a high risk of default. A subprime lender will charge a higher interest rate and set longer loan terms to cover the cost of their risk.

There are fairly rigid credit score requirements for a personal loan. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau lists five credit score levels; the first column shows what type of loan someone will qualify for.

Credit Level

Credit Score

Deep subprime Below 580
Subprime 580–619
Near-prime 620–659
Prime 660–719
Super-prime 720 and above

A borrower with a FICO score below 620 will find it difficult to secure a loan from a traditional lender. Many online lending platforms allow consumers to search a network of subprime personal loan lenders to find the best deal. Borrowers submit a loan application online to pre-qualify.

Subprime loans have certain characteristics. They may require a larger down payment. Someone with a fair credit score who takes out a car loan may have to pay 5% down, whereas someone with poor credit might have to put 10% down. A subprime loan may come with an adjustable interest rate or a fixed interest rate.

Types of Subprime Loans

There are four main types of subprime loans: interest-only, fixed-rate, adjustable-rate, and dignity loans.

Recommended: Personal Loan Interest Rates Now

Interest-Only Subprime Loan

Sometimes called exotic loans, an example of an interest-only loan is an adjustable-rate mortgage where the borrower pays only the interest for the first few years before beginning to cover some of the principal. If interest rates have gone up, the payments can become huge.

Pros of Interest-Only Subprime Loan

Cons of Interest-Only Subprime Loan

Initial monthly payments are lower The borrower is often not aware that interest rates could skyrocket in the future
An interest-only loan can be paid off faster than a traditional loan Borrowers may rely on having more income in the future to meet the higher payments
Flexibility: Borrowers can use extra cash to pay off the principal earlier In the case of a mortgage, if housing prices fall, the mortgage debt may exceed the value of the home

Fixed-Rate Subprime Loan

Fixed-rate subprime loans allow the borrower to lock into a fixed interest rate for the life of the loan. The monthly payments don’t change, so there are no surprises for the borrower. However, the terms of these loans are longer, and borrowers pay more interest over the life of the loan.

Pros of Fixed-Rate Subprime Loan

Cons of Fixed-Rate Subprime Loan

Interest rates are the same for the life of the loan Long repayment period (30 years or more), so the borrower pays more for the loan
Monthly payments don’t change No flexibility

Adjustable-Rate Subprime Loan

Interest rates on an adjustable-rate subprime loan are fixed for an initial period. After that, the interest rate will become variable, and your monthly payments will go up and down with market interest rates.

Pros of Adjustable-Rate Subprime Loan

Cons of Adjustable-Rate Subprime Loan

Interest rate is fixed for an initial period Once the initial period is over, the interest rate will increase
Interest rates can be low initially, so the borrower has cash that can be invested elsewhere Budgeting for the future is difficult because future payments are uncertain

Dignity Subprime Loan

For a dignity subprime loan, borrowers put down 10% of the loan amount to qualify. The interest rate is higher initially. Then the rate changes to the prime rate if the borrower has kept up with the payments.

Pros of Dignity Subprime Loan

Cons of Dignity Subprime Loan

If you keep up with the payments, the interest rate will drop to the prime rate A 10% down payment is required. The initial interest rate is high
Interest rates can be low initially, so the borrower has cash to invest elsewhere Budgeting for the future is difficult because future payments are uncertain

Pros and Cons of Subprime Personal Loan

The advantages and disadvantages of subprime personal loans center around the interest rates and fees. How disciplined the borrower is in their money management is also a factor.

Pros of Subprime Personal Loan

The pros of a subprime personal loan can be summed up as “perceived affordability.”

Adjustable Interest Rate

Adjustable interest rates are a double-edged sword. On the one hand, subprime loans with an adjustable rate are attractive because the initial rate is low. This frees up cash that savvy borrowers can use to earn money elsewhere or pay off the loan principal sooner. However, once the initial period is over, the rate can skyrocket with market rates.

Longer Repayment Period

A longer repayment period means that the borrower will have lower payments. However, they will end up paying more in interest over the life of the loan. Still, lower payments can be beneficial, particularly if the loan has a fixed interest rate, and the borrower knows exactly how much they must pay each month.

Cons of Subprime Personal Loans

The perceived affordability of subprime personal loans comes with trade-offs.

Higher Interest Rate

Subprime loans have significantly higher interest rates than prime loans. That means a subprime borrower can pay much more in interest over the life of their loan. For example, the median personal loan rate for a borrower with a credit score of 700 is 10.93%, whereas the median rate for a borrower with a 600 score is 15.91%.

An adjustable rate loan may have a low initial interest rate, but higher rates will eventually increase your monthly payments substantially.

Higher Fees

Subprime personal loan lenders charge higher fees to subprime borrowers to cover the cost of potential default.

Pros of Subprime Personal Loan

Cons of Subprime Personal Loan

Flexibility from adjustable interest rates Higher interest rates
Longer repayment periods Higher fees

What Credit Score Is Required for a Subprime Personal Loan?

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, credit scores of 620 and below qualify for a subprime personal loan.

The Impact a Subprime Personal Loan Has on Your Credit

Taking out a subprime loan will not affect your credit score. When a lender runs a credit check on a potential borrower, it affects the credit score a few points, but that is the same regardless of the type of loan.

On the other hand, how you manage the payments can affect your score. Making regular payments can boost your credit because your payment history improves. You may then be able to qualify for a prime-rate loan once you have paid down your debt.

Top 3 Subprime Loans

Here are the top three subprime lending platforms based on a Google search at the time of writing. Lending platforms allow borrowers to search a network of subprime lenders for the best loan terms.

CashUSA.com

Loans are available from $500 to $10,000. The subprime personal loans can be used for any purpose, and funds are deposited into the borrower’s bank account. There are no initiation fees.

For subprime personal loans, direct lenders offer APRs between 5.99% and 35.99% and loan durations from 90 days to 72 months. The site gives the following example: A two-year loan of $1,500 with an APR of 7.9% requires 24 monthly payments of $67.77, for a total amount payable of $1,626.54.

BadCreditLoans.com

Loans are available from $500 to $10,000. Funds are deposited into the borrower’s bank account the next business day. This lender charges no initiation fees.

Lenders from the site’s network offer APRs between 5.99% and 35.99%, with loan durations from 90 days to 72 months. The site gives the following example: A 12-month loan of $2,000 with an APR of 19.9% requires 12 monthly payments of $183.63, for a total amount payable of $2,203.56.

PersonalLoans.com

Loans are available from $500 to $35,000. Funds are deposited into the borrower’s bank account within one business day.

Lenders from the site’s network offer APRs between 5.99% to 35.99% and loan durations from 90 days to 72 months. The site gives the following example: A two-year loan of $8,500 with an APR of 6.99% requires 24 monthly payments of $380.53, for a total amount paid of $9,132.68.

Getting a Subprime Loan

Subprime personal loan lenders list few requirements. But the process for a subprime loan is generally the same as the steps to get any personal loan.

1.    Check your credit score. Look for any errors on your report that could be erased to boost your score. (Checking your own score doesn’t affect your rating.)

2.    Compare multiple lenders. Shop around for the best rate and term. Your current bank or credit union might offer good subprime terms to existing account holders.

3.    Select a lender. Make sure you understand the interest rate, repayment terms, and fees.

4.    Gather your documentation. Scan them ahead of time for quick uploading. Applicants are typically required to show:

a.    Proof of identity. Such as a driver’s license or passport.

b.    Proof of address. You can use a utility bill, rental agreement, voter registration card, or insurance card for your home or car.

c.    Proof of income. Choose from a paycheck, W2 or 1099, tax return, or bank statement showing paycheck deposits.

d.    Current monthly expenses. Use a bank statement, and highlight your major monthly bills.

5.    Complete the application. Once approved, you’ll need to sign for the loan to receive the funding.

Alternatives to Subprime Personal Loans

Subprime personal loans are not ideal. If you find yourself in the bad credit score range, consider alternatives like borrowing from friends or family, getting a cosigner to help you get a loan or credit card, or selling some of your assets to provide immediate cash.

For the future, try to improve your credit by paying debts on time, and check your credit report for errors.

The Takeaway

Subprime personal loans are typically offered by online lenders that cater to customers with a low credit rating who cannot qualify for loans with conventional financial institutions. Subprime lenders charge high-interest rates and financing fees to cover the risk of default. You can choose a fixed or adjustable interest rate.

3 Personal Loan Tips

  1. Since lenders will do what’s called a hard pull on an applicant’s credit, and too many hard pulls in a short period can affect your application, it’s a good idea to know what interest rate a lender will offer you before applying for a personal loan. Viewing your rate with SoFi involves only a soft pull on your credit — and takes one minute.
  2. Generally, the larger the personal loan, the bigger the risk for the lender — and the higher the interest rate. So one way to lower your interest rate is to try downsizing your loan amount.
  3. In a climate where interest rates are rising, you’re likely better off with a fixed interest rate than a variable rate, even though the variable rate is initially lower. On the flip side, if rates are falling, you may be better off with a variable interest rate.

FAQ

What credit score do you need to get a subprime personal loan?

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, credit scores of 620 and below qualify for a subprime personal loan.

What are subprime personal loans?

A subprime personal loan caters to borrowers with subprime credit. That means they are considered at a high risk of default, so a lender will charge them a higher interest rate and set longer loan terms to cover the cost of their risk.

What are the requirements for subprime personal loans?

To obtain a loan, borrowers must submit a loan application online and provide financial documents to show they can manage the payments.


Photo credit: iStock/shapecharge

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s website .

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Options for a $50,000 Personal Loan

$50,000 Personal Loan: What You Should Know

Most people could use a cash injection at some point in their lives. Perhaps they need to cover major home repairs, a big-ticket purchase, or emergency expenses. Whatever the reason, a personal loan may be a good idea, especially for borrowers with a strong credit history.

Read on to learn about $50,000 personal loans. Find out why they might be right for you (and when they may be wrong), how the terms are decided, and possible alternatives to a personal loan for $50K.

What Are Personal Loans?

Personal loans are a convenient way to fund a short-term cash flow problem or consolidate credit card debt. In many cases, once the loan is approved, the funds are deposited to your account within a day or two.

Banks, credit unions, or online lenders can all provide personal loans. The amount of a personal loan typically ranges from $1,000 to $100,000. Payback terms are flexible, running from 12 months to several years, and loan payments are due monthly. Personal loan rates vary depending on the credit score of the borrower: A higher credit score will be rewarded with better terms and a lower interest rate.

Despite their flexibility and convenience, there are pros and cons to personal loans that a borrower should be aware of before they opt for this financing option.

Recommended: How To Create a Personal Cash Flow Statement

Pros and Cons of Getting a $50,000 Personal Loan

One of the biggest advantages of an unsecured personal loan is that no collateral is required, which means you don’t risk losing your home or car. On the other hand, interest rates can be high if your credit score is low, and fees and penalties often apply.

Pros

Cons

Funds received in a lump sum, often within a day or two If you have poor credit, the interest rate could be higher than other financing options, even credit cards
No collateral required if it is an unsecured loan Few lenders available to borrowers with no financial history
Funds can be used for any purpose, unlike a mortgage or auto loan Potentially high fees and penalties for paying it off early
Excellent credit score not required Interest and fees may be high if your credit score is low
Interest rates often beat credit card rates Adds to your debt and is one more payment to make each month
Higher borrowing limits Monthly payments are higher than minimum payments on a credit card

Considerations When Looking for a $50,000 Personal Loan

Borrowers should pay special attention to these factors when comparing loans.

Types of Lenders

Three types of lenders offer personal loans: traditional banks, credit unions, and online lenders. Each lender will offer different loan terms, interest rates, and fees.

Online lenders will deliver funds faster, and they may offer lower rates because they have fewer overhead costs, such as physical branches to maintain. Banks and credit unions may offer discounts to their customers who hold checking or savings accounts.

Interest Rates

The biggest consideration for a $50,000 personal loan is the interest rate, because the rate and the length of the loan will determine the total cost of the loan. The shorter the loan, the less interest you will pay, and the lower the total cost.

In most cases personal loans have a fixed interest rate, but some do have variable rates. Variable rate loans often start out with a relatively low interest rate, but the rate can rise significantly later, increasing the monthly payments.

Fees

Origination fees can be hidden in the fine print, so make sure you understand how they impact the annual percentage rate (APR) that you are charged. Also check if there’s a prepayment penalty for paying off your loan early.

Total Repayment Cost

The total repayment cost of a $50,000 loan will depend on the interest rate and the length of the loan. You will make more payments over a longer term, racking up more interest and increasing the total cost of the loan. A shorter term will lower the total repayment cost. To minimize total repayment costs, select a loan with the biggest monthly payment you can comfortably afford and the shortest repayment term.

Monthly Payment Amount

The monthly payment is critical. If a monthly payment offered by a lender seems like a stretch, try to negotiate a longer repayment period. For instance, if a five-year loan is extended to a seven-year loan, you’ll make 84 smaller payments compared to 60 larger payments. Just remember, you’ll pay more interest over the life of the loan.

Credit Score

The minimum credit score to qualify for a $50,000 personal loan will depend on the lender. For such a significant loan amount, a traditional bank or credit union may require a credit score of 650 or more, which is considered a fair credit score. Other lenders may require a credit score of 600. Take steps to improve your score by removing any inaccuracies before you shop for a loan.

Recommended: What Is the Minimum Credit Score Needed To Get a Personal Loan

Debt to Income Ratio

A lender will consider your debt-to-income ratio when qualifying you for a personal loan. This ratio shows what proportion of your income is already used for existing debt, and whether you have enough income to pay the additional personal loan monthly payments. According to Investopedia, a debt-to-income ratio of around 36% or lower is desirable. A higher ratio may mean you’ll pay a higher interest rate.

Collateral

A personal loan is usually “unsecured,” which means that it doesn’t require collateral, such as your home, car, or savings account. If you have bad credit, however, the lender may ask you to provide collateral for a large loan.

Cosigner

One option for a borrower with bad credit is to apply with a cosigner that has good credit. This balances out the credit score calculation. The cosigner agrees to make the payments if you cannot.

How To Qualify for a $50,000 Personal Loan With Bad Credit

A $50,000 loan will be expensive if you have bad credit (read more on the bad credit score range). The best thing to do is to boost your credit score to at least 650. Check for any errors on your credit report, use credit cards sensibly, and pay bills on time.

It is possible to get $50,000 with a lower credit score, but you may have to resort to a secured loan, such as a home equity line of credit (HELOC), or find a cosigner.

Questions To Ask Yourself Before Taking Out a Large Personal Loan

A $50,000 personal loan is a huge financial commitment. Ask yourself the following questions before signing on the dotted line.

How Much Do I Really Need?

Minimizing your debt load means you pay less to lenders in fees and interest. Consider whether you can borrow money from another source at a lower cost and reduce the amount that you need from a personal loan.

Can You Afford the Monthly Payment?

If the monthly payment is going to take a big bite out of your paycheck each month, you may find yourself unable to meet the payments. Make sure your cash flow is sufficient to meet your monthly payments.

Is a Personal Loan Your Best Financing Option?

Look at other options before you settle on a $50,000 personal loan. If you have equity in your home, refinancing your mortgage or obtaining a HELOC might be a better choice. Credit cards and borrowing from family or friends are also good alternatives.

How Will the Loan Affect Your Credit?

When you are shopping for a loan, whether it be for $5,000, $10,000, or $100,000, a lender may pull a soft credit check to prequalify you. This will not affect your credit score. When you formally apply for your loan, the lender will do a hard credit check. This may reduce your credit score by around five points for one year.

Aside from credit checks, personal loans can help build your credit history or seriously hurt it, depending on how you manage your payments. If you make a payment that’s over 30 days late and it gets reported to the credit bureaus, it could lower your credit rating from excellent to fair. But if you use your loan to consolidate existing debt, your score might actually rise because your credit utilization ratio has improved.

Recommended: What’s the Difference Between a Hard and Soft Credit Check?

Alternatives to $50,000 Personal Loans

As we already mentioned, two alternatives to a $50,000 personal loan are a home equity loan or a HELOC. A home equity loan uses your home’s equity as collateral. This type of loan may have longer repayment terms and lower interest rates than personal loans because your home is used as security. However, you risk losing your home if you can’t make the payments.

A HELOC is a revolving line of credit that you can draw from when you need to. It works like a credit card but uses your home as collateral. Again, you risk losing your home if you cannot make the payments.

The Takeaway

Personal loans for $50,000 are easy to find. Traditional banks, credit unions, and online lenders all provide flexible personal loans. The terms of a personal loan will depend on your credit score, and the higher your score the lower your interest rate.

An online lender can prequalify you and deliver funds in a day or two to your account. A bank or credit union may take longer, but they may also offer better terms to their customers. Borrowers should find out the average personal loan interest rate, shop around with different lenders, and look out for origination fees and prepayment penalties hidden in the small print.

Consider a personal loan with SoFi. SoFi personal loans have absolutely zero fees required. No prepayment fees. No late fees.

SoFi’s Personal Loan was named NerdWallet’s 2022 winner for Best Online Personal Loan Overall.

FAQ

What credit score do I need to get a $50,000 personal loan?

Most lenders will require a credit score of 650 or more, which is considered a fair credit score. Other lenders may require a credit score of 600, but they will charge higher fees and a higher interest rate.

How can you qualify for a $50,000 personal loan?

In general, to qualify for a $50,000 personal loan you will need to show you have sufficient income to make the monthly payments and have a credit score of 650 or higher. You also must be 18 years old and a U.S. citizen, legal resident, or visa holder.

Is it hard to get a 50k personal loan?

It is not difficult to get a $50K personal loan if you have good credit. If you have poor credit, the number of lenders available to you will be limited, and you will likely face higher interest rates and high fees, making the loan quite costly.


Photo credit: iStock/undefined undefined

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s website .

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. However, if you choose a product and continue your application, we will request your full credit report from one or more consumer reporting agencies, which is considered a hard credit pull and may affect your credit.

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Is It Possible to Get an IRA Loan?

Is It Possible to Get an IRA Loan?

It’s not possible to take a loan from an IRA or Roth IRA. Making an early withdrawal from an IRA is an option, but that comes with taxes and penalties. You can borrow money from a 401(k) plan, however, without any penalties.

Read on to learn the impact of an early withdrawal from an IRA and some other ways to find the cash for unexpected expenses.

Can You Borrow from Your IRA?

An individual retirement account (IRA) is a savings account with tax advantages that is designed as a long-term investment vehicle for your retirement. The money that people invest in IRAs goes to a wide range of financial products, including stocks, bonds, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), and mutual funds. Banks and investment companies rely on holding the funds for a long time, so lawmakers created strict rules around withdrawing money from traditional and Roth IRAs. There is usually a 10% penalty and an income tax bill.

IRA loans and Roth IRA loans are not allowed. You cannot borrow money from these accounts, but you can withdraw cash from your IRA if you have to, at a cost.

Recommended: What Is the Credit Score Required to Get a Personal Loan?

What Is Possible: Early IRA Withdrawals

Here’s what you can and can’t do regarding withdrawing cash from traditional and Roth IRAs.

Traditional IRAs

If you are 59 ½ or older, you can take money out of your traditional IRA with no penalty, but you’ll owe income taxes on the money you pull out.

Account holders of any age can withdraw funds from an IRA and roll them over into another IRA or redeposit them into the same IRA within 60 days. This amounts to a 60-day loan, and you can do this once every 12 months. If you don’t roll over the funds within 60 days, the action will be considered a withdrawal or lump-sum cash distribution. That means paying federal and state taxes plus an additional 10% federal tax fee.

There are some exceptions that will allow you to avoid the additional 10% federal tax:

•   First-time homebuyers can withdraw $10,000 for a downpayment.

•   The funds are used for higher education expenses.

•   The funds are used for the birth or adoption of a child.

•   You have become permanently disabled.

Recommended: Personal Loan Glossary

Roth IRAs

If you’re at least 59 ½ and you’ve owned your Roth IRA for five years or more, you can take tax- and penalty-free Roth withdrawals of contributions. However, if you withdraw earnings, such as dividends or interest, you might have to pay the 10% penalty and income and state tax on that portion of the withdrawal.

Drawbacks of Early IRA Withdrawals

Disadvantages of early IRA withdrawals are penalties and missed earnings on the money taken out.

Penalties

Before age 59 ½, you are subject to a 10% penalty on any amount withdrawn. The same penalty holds if you fail to redeposit a rollover within 60 days.

Taxes

Before age 59 ½, you are subject to federal and state taxes on early withdrawals.

Lack of Growth Potential

If you take funds out of your IRA, you will lose the earnings from that money that would otherwise go toward your retirement. In that sense, a $10,000 withdrawal could cost you much more than $10K in the long run.

Early IRA Withdrawal Alternatives

There are alternatives to withdrawing funds from an IRA. The best option for you depends on how much cash you need, the taxes and penalties you might pay, and the interest and fees you might pay on the alternative. Here’s a look at some of them.

401(k) Loan

Borrowing from your 401(k) is allowed. If your plan is amenable, you can take out as much as 50% of your savings, up to a maximum of $50,000, within 12 months. You will have to pay back the money, plus interest, within five years. However, the interest is paid back into your own account.

The advantage of a 401(k) loan is that there are no taxes or penalties. The disadvantage is that if you leave your current job, you may have to repay your loan in full. If you cannot, you’ll owe both taxes and a 10% penalty if you’re under 59 ½.

Family Loan

A family loan could be the best option if you can negotiate favorable terms. This route is also the most flexible but can affect family relationships if not handled well. Be sure to set expectations and draw up a contract to protect both parties.

Credit Card Cash Advance

A credit card cash advance is a quick way to get funds. No hard credit inquiry is needed, so there is no effect on your credit score. You can pay small fixed monthly payments, but there will be interest that accrues daily as well as fees.

The interest charges and fees will need to be weighed against the cost of an early withdrawal from an IRA. There may be a charge of up to 5% for a cash withdrawal. There may also be a flat charge for a withdrawal in addition to the percentage charge.

Depending on your credit line, the amount you can withdraw may be less than your credit limit.

Personal Loan

Most of the time, if you are looking for a specific sum of money that you would like to repay over time, a personal loan is a good choice. Current personal loan interest rates are generally much lower than for a cash advance.

Early IRA Withdrawal vs Personal Loan

Your decision may come down to an early IRA withdrawal versus a personal loan. Let’s look at the pros and cons of each.

Pros of Early IRA Withdrawal

•   If you have a Roth IRA, you can withdraw contributions (but not earnings) free of tax and penalties.

•   Early withdrawals provide emergency funds without interest and fees.

Cons of Early IRA Withdrawal

•   You cannot repay the money you withdraw, so you will have less of a nest egg for retirement.

•   If you withdraw gains from a Roth IRA, you may have to pay taxes and fees.

•   You miss out on earnings from the amount that you withdraw.

Pros of a Personal Loan

•   There are no withdrawal penalties with a personal loan.

•   Your retirement savings stay intact, and you will continue to earn money on the funds.

•   A personal loan can put cash into your bank account within one to two business days.

Cons of a Personal Loan

•   Some shopping around is required, and there is an application process.

•   A minimum credit score might be required.

•   Average interest rates and fees could be high depending on your credit score.

The Takeaway

Account holders may not take out loans from an IRA or Roth IRA. Making an early withdrawal from an IRA is an option, but that comes with taxes and a 10% penalty. Because you cannot pay the funds back, a withdrawal loses out on the investment gains those funds would have earned. However, you can withdraw money from your IRA as long as you redeposit it or roll it over into a new account within 60 days. And you can borrow money from a 401(k) plan without any penalties.

Before you consider withdrawing from your IRA, consider a personal loan. SoFi offers competitive personal loans with no origination, prepayment, or late fees. Getting a personal loan is usually straightforward, and funds can be deposited as soon as the same day.

SoFi’s Personal Loan was named NerdWallet’s 2022 winner for Best Online Personal Loan.

FAQ

Can I take a loan from my IRA?

There is no such thing as an IRA loan because you cannot pay the money back. You can withdraw funds from an IRA and roll them over into the same or another IRA within 60 days, and you can do this once every 12 months. If you don’t roll over the funds within 60 days, the action will be considered a withdrawal or lump-sum cash distribution. That means you will have to pay federal and state taxes plus an additional 10% penalty.

How do I get an IRA loan?

You can’t borrow from your IRA. However, if you’re 59 ½ or older, you can request a distribution from your traditional IRA without any penalty. Since your original contributions were tax-deductible, you’ll need to pay income tax on the funds you withdraw.

If you have a Roth IRA, you can withdraw both contributions and earnings tax-free and penalty-free, but only if you are 59 ½ or older and have owned your Roth IRA for five years or more. If you withdraw earnings early, you’ll have to pay a 10% penalty and income tax on the amount you withdraw.

Lastly, you can use the 60-day rollover rule to your advantage if you can repay the borrowed money in 60 days or less and avoid paying taxes and penalties.


Photo credit: iStock/Geber86

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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All About $15,000 Personal Loans

All About $15,000 Personal Loans

Personal loans used to be considered a last resort to resolve cash flow issues. Today, according to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, personal loans are the fastest growing lending vehicle in the nation. Personal loans are appealing partly because of their flexibility. They can be used for almost any purpose, whether to fix up a home or consolidate credit card debt. Borrowers can receive anywhere from $1,000 to $100,000, choose a fixed or variable interest rate, even select the length of the loan.

Read on to find out more about how personal loans work, how to qualify, their advantages and disadvantages, and whether a personal loan is right for you.

What Is the Required Credit Score for a $15,000 Personal Loan?

You will likely need a credit score of at least 660 for a $15,000 personal loan. Many lenders don’t state a minimum required credit score because they will vary the terms for each borrower depending on their credit history. The higher your score, the more money you can qualify for and the better the interest rate.

Benefits of a $15,000 Personal Loan

A $15,000 personal loan is a sizable amount that can serve many purposes. Common personal loan uses include making large purchases, covering living expenses for a defined period, consolidating debt, and paying off a credit card with a higher interest rate. Here are some other benefits:

Interest Rates and Flexible Terms

There are many types of personal loans, and interest rates can be fixed or variable. The interest rate that a lender charges will depend on the borrower’s credit rating and the length of the loan, but rates are typically lower than for other forms of debt. Loan lengths can vary from a few months to a few years.

No Collateral Required

Personal loans are typically unsecured, which means no collateral is required. If you don’t qualify only for an unsecured loan, you may select a loan cosigner with a stronger credit rating to help you get approved.

Recommended: Guarantor vs Cosigner

Fixed Monthly Payments

Most personal loans have fixed monthly payments based on the amount borrowed, the interest rate, and the term. This makes budgeting easier because the borrower knows how much they must pay each month.

Recommended: Try Our Personal Loan Calculator

Cons of a $15,000 Personal Loan

One disadvantage of a $15,000 personal loan is that it can be expensive, especially if you have bad credit or need to spread the payments out over many years. The longer the term, the more you will pay in interest. Here are some other issues to consider:

Taking on Debt

If you already have trouble paying your monthly bills, taking on more debt may not be a good idea. Some borrowers use a personal loan to consolidate other debt that charges higher interest, such as credit cards. For people who have a tendency to overspend, freeing up their credit may just encourage them to spend more again.

Higher Payments Than Credit Cards

Credit cards do not have a deadline to pay off the entire debt. For that reason, the monthly minimum payment is typically less than the payment on a personal loan. If a personal loan is used to consolidate credit card debt, some borrowers may find it difficult to make the higher payments of a personal loan.

Origination Fees and Prepayment Penalties

Some lenders will charge an origination fee to cover the cost of setting up the loan. Additionally, if the borrower wants to pay off the loan before the payoff date, the lender may charge a penalty. Borrowers should find out about any fees and penalties before deciding on a lender.

Interest Rates May Be Higher Than Other Options

For borrowers with poor credit, the interest rate on a personal loan can be high. In this case, a credit card might be a better option.

Where Can I Get a $15,000 Personal Loan?

Online lenders, traditional banks, and credit unions all provide $15,000 personal loans. Some online lenders pre-qualify borrowers so they can see the terms, and many will deposit funds into a bank account within one to two days.

Traditional banks or credit unions may offer better terms to their members because there is a pre-existing relationship. But they may also want to meet with a borrower in person to negotiate the loan.

How to Get a $15,000 Personal Loan

The steps to get approved for a personal loan are typically the same regardless of the lender. The first step, before you even apply, is to review your credit history. You can pull a report for free from each of the three major credit bureaus — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — from the website AnnualCreditReport.com. Then you can file a dispute online to have any inaccuracies removed. This can boost your credit rating and ensure you get the best terms from a lender.

Here are the basic application steps you’ll need to be prepared for:

1. Check Your Eligibility

Shop around for the best loan terms and find out if you qualify. Check both online lenders and traditional lenders, paying special attention to origination fees and prepayment penalties.

2. Get Pre-qualified

Getting pre-qualified will show you what terms the lender is offering based on your credit history. Fill out the online form, including how much you want to borrow and your desired payoff time frame.

Lenders will pull your credit report to pre-qualify you, which may ding your credit score. Focus on lenders who will perform a “soft inquiry” for pre-qualification, which will not affect your credit rating.

Recommended: What’s the Difference Between a Hard and Soft Credit Check?

3. Check the Terms

Once you are pre-qualified, review the pre-approval letter and check the loan amount. Check whether it is an unsecured or secured loan, the annual percentage rate (APR), and whether the interest rate is fixed or variable. Pay attention to the monthly payment and the payback term. Also look for fees, penalties, and other potential charges.

4. Apply for the Loan

Gather the documents that you will need to apply for the loan. Borrowers typically need to upload a pay stub, mortgage or rent agreement, debt documentation, proof of identity, and their social security number.

Applying for Other Small Loan Amounts

Loan amounts can range from $1,000 up to 100,000. The terms for a small $3,000 personal loan will vary with those for a larger loan. Here are some examples of loan interest rates, terms, and monthly payments.

$5,000 Personal Loans

Here’s a typical scenario for a borrower with average credit (700–759 credit score): The monthly payments on a $5,000 personal loan, paid back over five years at an APR of 15.75% to 18.25%, would be around $121–$128.

$10,000 Personal Loans

For a $10,000 personal loan paid back over five years at an APR of 12.75% to 15.25%, a borrower with average credit would pay $226 to $239 per month.

$20,000 Personal Loans

For a $20,000 loan paid back over five years at an APR of 12.75% to 15.25%, a borrower with average credit would pay $452 to $478 per month.

The Takeaway

Personal loan interest rates are determined by a borrower’s credit rating and financial history. The higher the credit rating, the lower the interest rate. For consumers with good credit, a $15,000 personal loan can be a more affordable form of debt than credit cards. For consumers with bad credit, the higher interest rate may make a $15,000 personal loan less attractive.

SoFi offers competitive personal loans. There are no origination, prepayment, or late fees as there are with some other lenders, and our competitive interest rates are fixed, making budgeting easier.

SoFi’s Personal Loan was named NerdWallet’s 2022 winner for Best Online Personal Loan overall.

FAQ

What credit score is needed for a personal loan for $15,000?

A credit score of at least 660 is typically required for a $15,000 personal loan. Some lenders that cater to people with poor credit will charge higher interest rates and fees to cover their elevated risk.

How long can I get a $15,000 personal loan for?

Personal loans are typically for three, five, or seven years. The shorter the repayment period, the less interest you will pay over the life of the loan.

What would payments be on a $15,000 personal loan?

The monthly payments on a $15,000 loan depend on the interest rate and repayment terms. If you know how much you want to borrow, over what period, and at what interest rate, an online loan calculator can tell you what your payments will be.


Photo credit: iStock/fizkes

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s website .

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Checking Your Rates: To check the rates and terms you may qualify for, SoFi conducts a soft credit pull that will not affect your credit score. However, if you choose a product and continue your application, we will request your full credit report from one or more consumer reporting agencies, which is considered a hard credit pull and may affect your credit.

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