Mega Backdoor Roths, Explained

For those who earn an income that makes them ineligible to contribute to a Roth IRA, a mega backdoor Roth IRA may be an effective tool to help them save for retirement, and also get a potential tax break in their golden years.

Only a certain type of individual will likely choose to employ a mega backdoor Roth IRA as a part of their financial plans. And there are a number of conditions that have to be met for mega backdoor Roth to be possible.

Read on to learn what mega backdoor Roth IRAs are, how they work, and the important details that investors need to know about them.

What Is a Mega Backdoor Roth IRA?

The mega backdoor Roth IRA is a retirement savings strategy in which people who have 401(k) plans through their employer — along with the ability to make after-tax contributions to that plan — can roll over the after-tax contributions into a Roth IRA.

But first, it’s important to understand the basics of regular Roth IRAs. A Roth IRA is a retirement account for individuals. For tax year 2023, Roth account holders can contribute up to $6,500 per year (or $7,500 for those 50 and older) of their post-tax earnings. That is, income tax is being paid upfront on those earnings — the opposite of a traditional IRA. For 2024, they can contribute up to $7,000 (or $8,000 for those 50 and older).

Individuals can withdraw their contributions at any time, without paying taxes or penalties. For that reason, Roth IRAs are attractive and useful savings vehicles for many people.

But Roth IRAs have their limits — and one of them is that people can only contribute to one if their income is below a certain threshold.

In 2023 the limit is $138,000 for single people (people earning more than $138,000 but less than $153,000 can contribute a reduced amount); for married people who file taxes jointly, the limit is $218,000 (or between $218,000 to $228,000 to contribute a reduced amount).

In 2024 the limit is $146,000 for single people (people earning more than $146,000 but less than $161,000 can contribute a reduced amount); for married people who file taxes jointly, the limit is $230,000 (or between $230,000 to $240,000 to contribute a reduced amount).

💡 Quick Tip: Did you know that you must choose the investments in your IRA? Once you open a new IRA and start saving, you get to decide which mutual funds, ETFs, or other investments you want — it’s totally up to you.

Boost your retirement contributions with a 1% match.

SoFi IRAs now get a 1% match on every dollar you deposit, up to the annual contribution limits. Open an account today and get started.


Only offers made via ACH are eligible for the match. ACATs, wires, and rollovers are not included.

How Does a Mega Backdoor Roth Work?

When discussing a mega backdoor Roth, it’s helpful to understand how a regular backdoor Roth IRA works. Generally, individuals with income levels above the thresholds mentioned who wish to contribute to a Roth IRA are out of luck. However, there is a workaround: the backdoor Roth IRA, a strategy that allows high-earners to fund a Roth IRA account by converting funds in a traditional IRA (which has no limits on a contributors’ earnings) into a Roth IRA. This could be useful if an individual expects to be in a higher income bracket at retirement than they are currently.

Mega backdoor Roth IRAs involve 401(k) plans. People who have 401(k) plans through their employer — along with the ability to make after-tax contributions to that plan — can potentially roll over up to $46,000 in 2024, and $43,500 in 2023, in after-tax contributions into a Roth IRA. That mega Roth transfer limit has the potential to boost an individual’s retirement savings.

Example Scenario: How to Pull Off a Mega Backdoor Roth IRA

The mega backdoor Roth IRA process is pretty much the same as that of a backdoor Roth IRA. The key difference is that while the regular backdoor involves converting funds from a traditional IRA into a Roth IRA, the mega backdoor involves converting after-tax funds from a 401(k) into a Roth IRA.

Whether a mega backdoor Roth IRA is even an option will depend on an individual’s specific circumstances. These are the necessary conditions that need to be in place for someone to try a mega backdoor strategy:

•   You have a 401(k) plan. People hoping to enact the mega backdoor strategy will need to be enrolled in their employer-sponsored 401(k) plan.

•   You can make after-tax contributions to your 401(k). Determine whether an employer will allow for additional, after-tax contributions.

•   The 401(k) plan allows for in-service distributions. A final piece of the puzzle is to determine whether a 401(k) plan allows non-hardship distributions to either a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k). If not, that money will remain in the 401(k) account until the owner leaves the company, with no chance of a mega backdoor Roth IRA move.

If these conditions exist, a mega backdoor strategy should be possible. Here’s how the process would work:

Open a Roth IRA — so there’s an account to transfer those additional funds to.

From there, pulling off the mega backdoor Roth IRA strategy may sound deceptively straightforward — max out 401(k) contributions and after-tax 401(k) contributions, and then transfer those after-tax contributions to the Roth IRA.

But be warned: There may be many unforeseen hurdles or expenses that arise during the process, and for that reason, consulting with a financial professional to help navigate may be advisable.

Who Is Eligible for a Mega Backdoor Roth

Whether you might be eligible for a mega backdoor Roth depends on your workplace 401(k) retirement plan. First, the plan would need to allow for after-tax contributions. Then the 401(k) plan must also allow for in-service distributions to a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k). If your 401(k) plan meets both these criteria, you should generally be eligible for a mega backdoor Roth IRA.

💡 Quick Tip: Did you know that opening a brokerage account typically doesn’t come with any setup costs? Often, the only requirement to open a brokerage account — aside from providing personal details — is making an initial deposit.

Contribution Limits

If your employer allows for additional, after-tax contributions to your 401(k), you’ll need to figure out what your maximum after-tax contribution is. The standard 401(k) contribution limit for all types of contributions to a 401(k) (meaning employee, employer, and after-tax contributions) in 2023 is $22,500 (or $30,000 for those 50 and older). For 2024, the limit is $23,000 (or $30,500 for those 50 and older).

The IRS allows up to $66,000, or $73,500 including catch-up contributions for those 50 and up, in total contributions to a 401(k) in 2023. For 2024, the total limits are $69,000, or 76,500 including catch-up contributions for those 50 and up.

So how much can you contribute in after-tax funds? Here’s an example. Say you are under age 50 and you contributed the max of $22,500 to your 401(k) in 2023, and your employer contributed $8,000, for a total of $30,500. That means you can contribute up to $35,500 in after-tax contributions to reach the total contribution level of $66,000.

Is a Mega Backdoor Roth Right For Me?

Given that this Roth IRA workaround has so many moving parts, it’s worth thinking carefully about whether a mega backdoor Roth IRA makes sense for you. These are the advantages and disadvantages.

Benefits

The main upside of a mega backdoor Roth is that it allows those who are earning too much to contribute to a Roth IRA a way to potentially take advantage of tax-free growth.

Plus, with a mega backdoor Roth IRA an individual can effectively supercharge retirement savings because more money can be stashed away. It may also offer a way to further diversify retirement savings.

Downsides

The mega backdoor Roth IRA is a complicated process, and there are a lot of factors at play that an individual needs to understand and stay on top of.

In addition, when executing a mega backdoor Roth IRA and converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA, it could result in significant taxes, as the IRS will apply income tax to contributions that were previously deducted.

The Future of Mega Backdoor Roths

Mega backdoor Roths are currently permitted as long as you have a 401(k) plan that meets all the criteria to make you eligible.

However, it’s possible that the mega backdoor Roth IRA could go away at some point. In prior years, there was some legislation introduced that would have eliminated the strategy, but that legislation was not enacted.

The Takeaway

Strategies like the mega backdoor Roth IRA may be used by some investors to help achieve their retirement goals — as long as specific conditions are met, including having a 401(k) plan that accepts after-tax contributions.

While retirement may feel like far off, especially if you’re early in your career or still relatively young, it’s generally wise to start thinking about it sooner rather than later.

Ready to invest for your retirement? It’s easy to get started when you open a traditional or Roth IRA with SoFi. SoFi doesn’t charge commissions, but other fees apply (full fee disclosure here).

Help grow your nest egg with a SoFi IRA.

FAQ

Are mega backdoor Roths still allowed in 2023?

Yes, mega backdoor Roths are still permissible in 2023.

Is a mega backdoor Roth worth it?

Whether a mega backdoor Roth is worth it depends on your specific situation. It may be worth it for you if you earn too much to otherwise be eligible for a Roth IRA and if you have a 401(k) plan that allows you to make after-tax contributions.

Is a mega backdoor Roth legal?

Yes, a mega backdoor Roth IRA is currently legal.

Are mega backdoor Roths popular among Fortune 500 companies?

A number of Fortune 500 companies allow the after-tax contributions to a 401(k) that are necessary for executing a mega backdoor Roth IRA.

What is a super backdoor Roth?

A super backdoor Roth IRA is the same thing as a mega backdoor Roth IRA. It is a strategy in which people who have 401(k) plans through their employer — along with the ability to make after-tax contributions to that plan — can roll over the after-tax contributions into a Roth IRA.


Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Investment Risk: Diversification can help reduce some investment risk. It cannot guarantee profit, or fully protect in a down market.

Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs): Investors should carefully consider the information contained in the prospectus, which contains the Fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other relevant information. You may obtain a prospectus from the Fund company’s website or by email customer service at [email protected]. Please read the prospectus carefully prior to investing.
Shares of ETFs must be bought and sold at market price, which can vary significantly from the Fund’s net asset value (NAV). Investment returns are subject to market volatility and shares may be worth more or less their original value when redeemed. The diversification of an ETF will not protect against loss. An ETF may not achieve its stated investment objective. Rebalancing and other activities within the fund may be subject to tax consequences.


SOIN0124016

Read more
New Parent's Guide to Setting Up a Will

New Parent’s Guide to Setting Up a Will

Starting a family comes with an entirely new set of responsibilities. One of the most important, yet frequently overlooked, necessities is setting up a will. This crucial document outlines tons of important details should you pass away, including what happens to your child.

Estate planning for parents can be broken down into just a few digestible steps. Here’s everything you need to think about, plus tips on how to organize all of your documents.

Estate Planning for New Parents

1. Draft a Will

About 67% of Americans don’t have a will. Setting up a will can be simpler than it seems. A will is a document that outlines how you want things handled after you pass away, including distribution of assets and how any minor children to be cared for.

While some people with complex investments and multiple properties may want to hire a lawyer for help, younger, healthy individuals can seek out online services that can walk them through the steps to make a will and sometimes have no initial cost.

Then, you can follow the execution instructions, which typically include signing your will in front of eligible witnesses. Check your state’s individual requirements. Sometimes, you must have your will notarized in order to become valid. Many banks and public libraries offer this service for free.

If you’re married, consider drafting a joint will with your spouse. This gives you the ability to plan for different scenarios, like what happens when one spouse passes away versus both passing away at the same time. Remember to regularly update your will whenever a major life change occurs, like having another child or adding new major assets.


💡 Quick Tip: We all know it’s good to have a will in place, but who has the time? These days, you can create a complete and customized estate plan online in as little as 15 minutes.

2. Choose an Executor

When you’re setting up a will, you’ll need to choose an executor. This is the person responsible for handling the legal and logistical aspects of disbursing your assets. They are also responsible for filing any remaining taxes and settling your debts.

Consequently, your executor should be someone you trust and who has the ability to handle the tasks involved. This is especially important when you have young children because the executor’s ability to tie up your finances will impact your kids’ inheritance.

Once you choose an executor, let them know that you’ve chosen them. Give them a quick rundown of what to expect, and also let them know where to find your will and other relevant documents.

3. Name a Guardian

When you start having kids, you also need to name a guardian to care for them if you pass away before they reach legal adulthood. There are a lot of things to consider when making this important decision.

First, think about the potential guardian’s ability to care for children. Are their grandparents too old to take care of them? Does the guardian live far away from other friends and family who could serve as a support system?

Also consider their financial capabilities and their ability to manage any assets you leave to help pay for your kids’ expenses.

Finally, think about your values and who would raise your children in a way that’s similar to your own parenting style. Also realize that your kids will be going through a tough time, so their guardian would ideally be someone whom they trust and would provide emotional comfort.

If you have more than one child, make sure you name a guardian for each one, even if it’s the same person. That means you need to update your will every time you have a new baby. Be as explicit as possible when naming a guardian; for instance, if you pick a sibling and their spouse, name both individuals as coguardians.

4. Set Up the Right Accounts

Some types of accounts may help you pass on your assets without having to pay as much in taxes. It’s an important part of the estate planning process and can help you maximize the amount of money you’re able to pass onto your kids. A trust fund can protect the money from being spent too quickly, either by the guardian or your children themselves.

You can implement safeguards as to how much money can be taken out and when. Even if your kids are of legal age, you can put annual withdrawal limits on the trust to prevent a young adult from overspending. Alternatively, even if you pick a guardian to oversee the emotional wellbeing of your children, that same person may not be the best at handling money. Choosing a trust can limit their spending on behalf of your children as well.

There are many different types of trusts, so you may consider consulting an estate planning attorney to choose the best one for your family’s needs.


💡 Quick Tip: A trust is a customized estate planning tool that can be helpful for your heirs in addition to a will.

5. Designate Beneficiaries

The final step of estate planning for parents is to designate a beneficiary for every account and insurance policy you have. Include bank accounts, retirement and other investment accounts, and life insurance policies.

When choosing beneficiaries, find out how each type of account is taxed for the recipient. Also create a list of all of your account numbers and other pertinent details and include them with your will. This makes it easy for your executor to locate all of your assets. Include debt information as well, like your mortgage and/or auto loan servicer.

You can also update beneficiaries as life changes. For instance, you might initially name your spouse as your life insurance beneficiary. But if they pass away before you, it’s time to update that designation to someone else.

6. Safely Store Your Documents

Once you’ve drafted your will and signed it in accordance with your state’s laws, it’s time to store all of the appropriate estate planning documents to make it easy for your executor and beneficiaries to access.

Lots of documents are now stored online, but you’ll still need to keep your original, signed will in physical form. You can keep it in a fire-proof box at home, or in a safety deposit box at your local bank. Be sure your executor knows where and how to access your documents.

7. Outline Access to Financial Accounts

Remember to keep an up-to-date list of all your financial accounts that need to be taken care of. Bank statements should include the account numbers to make it easy for your executor to find. Also include the location of any valuable items, like art or jewelry.

Finally, it’s helpful to include the contact information for any professionals you work with, like an accountant, financial advisor, and estate attorney. Include insurance policy numbers, loan details, credit card numbers, and any other financial accounts that would need to be closed.

The Takeaway

Estate planning for parents isn’t a one-time event. Get started when you have your first child, but also review your intentions and make changes at least once a year. That way, you always have an up-to-date and comprehensive will that reflects your current financials and family structure.

When you want to make things easier on your loved ones in the future, SoFi can help. We partnered with Trust & Will, the leading online estate planning platform, to give our members 15% off their trust, will, or guardianship. The forms are fast, secure, and easy to use.

Create a complete and customized estate plan in as little as 15 minutes.


Coverage and pricing is subject to eligibility and underwriting criteria.
Ladder Insurance Services, LLC (CA license # OK22568; AR license # 3000140372) distributes term life insurance products issued by multiple insurers- for further details see ladderlife.com. All insurance products are governed by the terms set forth in the applicable insurance policy. Each insurer has financial responsibility for its own products.
Ladder, SoFi and SoFi Agency are separate, independent entities and are not responsible for the financial condition, business, or legal obligations of the other, Social Finance. Inc. (SoFi) and Social Finance Life Insurance Agency, LLC (SoFi Agency) do not issue, underwrite insurance or pay claims under Ladder Life™ policies. SoFi is compensated by Ladder for each issued term life policy.
SoFi Agency and its affiliates do not guarantee the services of any insurance company.
All services from Ladder Insurance Services, LLC are their own. Once you reach Ladder, SoFi is not involved and has no control over the products or services involved. The Ladder service is limited to documents and does not provide legal advice. Individual circumstances are unique and using documents provided is not a substitute for obtaining legal advice.


Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

SOPT0923005

Read more

ETF Tax Efficiency: Advantages Over Mutual Funds

There’s no denying that exchange-traded funds (ETFs) are popular. According to the New York Stock Exchange’s most recent quarterly ETF report , as of December 31, 2020 there were 2,391 ETF listed in the U.S. Those funds hold a total of $5.49 trillion in assets, with an average of $111.5 billion transactional daily value.

Investors primarily turn to ETFs because of the returns. The average annual 10-year return for the benchmark SPDR S&P 500 ETF stands at above 14% at the end of 2020. (That said, as always past performance is not a guarantee of future success.)

There is another major benefit of ETFs—they’re a good tax-limitation tool.

In a 2019 Morningstar report on investment funds and taxes, analysts conclude that 84% of all ETF portfolio assets were steered toward specially-focused funds that closely follow market-cap weighted indexes. Such funds historically have low investor turnover, which in turn curbs capital gains and fund distributions, and thus reduces excess “taxable events.”

ETFs & Mutual Funds: How They Differ

When it comes to understanding ETFs vs mutual funds, it’s often best to start with a simple explanation for each.

Both mutual funds and ETFs invest in a group or “basket” of underlying stocks, bonds, commodities, and other financial assets, on behalf of fund shareholders. But ETFs trade on a daily basis much like stocks and bonds. Mutual funds do not.

Mutual funds offer investors a menu of various share classes where they can invest their money. Given the wider assets selection options available, a mutual fund investor may see more fund fees to compensate for that expanded menu. Given their low trading structure, ETF fees are usually lower than mutual funds, resulting in a lower expense ratio.

ETF Tax Advantages Over Mutual Funds

Tax-wise, The IRS treats ETFs and mutual funds the same. When either fund model sells securities that have appreciated in value, it creates a capital gain—or capital appreciation on the investment—which is taxable under U.S. law.

ETF fund managers make trades for a variety of reasons. For example, an asset can be bought and sold for strategic reasons (i.e. to properly allocate assets or to avoid “style drift” when a fund slides away from its target strategy.) Trades also must be made upon shareholder redemptions—when they redeem some or all of the assets they’ve invested in the fund.

The more trades made by ETF fund managers, the more taxable events occur. Consequently, for fund managers and investors, the goal is to find ways to keep those taxes from accumulating.

An ETF’s structure can help curb the negative impact of taxes, in the following ways.

Lower Capital Gains Impact

Since the IRS considers capital gains a taxable event, a major goal with any fund investment is to reduce the impact of capital gain payouts to shareholders at year end.

ETFs typically accumulate fewer capital gains than mutual funds. When a mutual fund has to redeem assets back to shareholders, it must sell assets to create the money needed to pay out those redemptions, resulting in capital gains. But when an ETF shareholder wants to sell shares, they can easily do so by trading the ETF to another investor—just like a stock transaction. That, in turn, creates no capital gains impact for the ETF—and adds a major tax advantage for ETF investors.

Index Tracking Tax Benefits

Since many ETFs are structured to track a particular index, trades are made only when there are changes in the underlying index (like when the S&P 500 or the Russell 2000 index experience significant fluctuations that require some ETF stabilization.) Fewer transactions generally means lower taxes.

The Use of “Creation Units”

ETFs are built to trade differently than mutual funds. With ETFs, fund managers can leverage so-called “creation units”—blocks of shares—to buy and sell fund securities. These units enable fund managers to buy or sell assets collectively, instead of individually. That means fewer trades and fewer taxable trade execution events.

Downsides of ETFs and Taxes

Though ETF tax efficiency is generally better than that of mutual funds, that doesn’t mean ETFs come with no tax risks. There are a few taxable events that bear watching for investors.

Distributions and dividends

Just like any investment vehicle, ETFs can come with regular distributions and dividends, which are usually taxable.

Increased Trade Activity on Actively Managed Funds

Though most ETFs simply follow an investment index, there are some actively managed ETFs. With actively-managed funds, more trades are made, which may lead directly to a more onerous tax bill.

High Trading Costs

Since ETFs are traded like stocks, the fees that come with buying and selling ETF assets usually trigger trading costs that are akin to trading stocks—and those fees can be high. Historically, brokerage trading fees are among the highest fees in the investment industry, which isn’t great news for ETF investors. Even if investors do save on taxes, those savings can potentially be mitigated or even wiped out by high ETF trading costs.

The Takeaway

Exchange traded funds offer ample potential tax benefits to savings-minded investors—especially in key areas like capital gains, expense ratios, redemptions, and trading frequency.

SoFi Invest® offers investors an easy, low-cost way to diversify their portfolio with ETFs. Investors can choose from a variety of ETFs designed specifically for ambitious investors with long-term goals for their investments.

Find out how SoFi Invest ETFs can be a part of your financial portfolio.


SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Fund Fees
If you invest in Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) through SoFi Invest (either by buying them yourself or via investing in SoFi Invest’s automated investments, formerly SoFi Wealth), these funds will have their own management fees. These fees are not paid directly by you, but rather by the fund itself. these fees do reduce the fund’s returns. Check out each fund’s prospectus for details. SoFi Invest does not receive sales commissions, 12b-1 fees, or other fees from ETFs for investing such funds on behalf of advisory clients, though if SoFi Invest creates its own funds, it could earn management fees there.
SoFi Invest may waive all, or part of any of these fees, permanently or for a period of time, at its sole discretion for any reason. Fees are subject to change at any time. The current fee schedule will always be available in your Account Documents section of SoFi Invest.


External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

SOIN0523067

Read more
Simple IRA vs. Traditional IRA

Is a SIMPLE IRA the Same as a Traditional IRA?

One of the most popular retirement accounts is an IRA, or Individual Retirement Account. IRAs allow individuals to put money aside over time to save up for retirement, with tax benefits similar to those of other retirement plans.

Two common IRAs are the SIMPLE IRA and the Traditional IRA, both of which have their own benefits, downsides, and rules around who can open an account. For investors trying to decide which IRA to open, it helps to know the differences between SIMPLE IRAs and Traditional IRAs.

SIMPLE IRA vs Traditional IRA: Side-by-Side Comparison

Although there are many similarities between the two accounts, there are some key differences. This chart details the key attributes of each plan:

SIMPLE IRA Traditional IRA
Offered by employers Yes No
Who it’s for Small-business owners and their employees Individuals
Eligibility Earn at least $5,000 per year Under 70 ½ years old and earned income in the past year
Tax deferred Yes Yes
Tax deductible contributions Yes, for employers and sole proprietors only Yes
Employer contribution Required No
Fee for early withdrawal 10% plus income tax, or 25% if money is withdrawn within two years of an employer making a deposit 10% plus income tax
Contribution limits $15,500 in 2023
$16,000 in 2024
$6,500 in 2023
$7,000 in 2024
Catch-up contribution $3,500 additional per year for people 50 and over $1,000 additional per year for people 50 and over

SIMPLE IRAs Explained

The SIMPLE IRA, which stands for Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees, is set up to help small-business owners help both themselves and their employees save for retirement. It’s a retirement plan that small businesses with fewer than 100 employees can offer employees who earn at least $5,000 per year.

A SIMPLE IRA is similar to a Traditional IRA, in that a plan participant can make tax-deferred contributions to their account, so that it grows over time with compound interest. When the individual retires and begins withdrawing money, then they must pay income taxes on the funds.

With a SIMPLE IRA, both the employer and the employee contribute to the employee’s account. Employers are required to contribute in one of two ways: either by matching employee contributions up to 3% of their salary, or by contributing a flat rate of 2% of the employee’s salary, even if the employee doesn’t contribute. With the matching option, the employee must contribute money first.

There are yearly employee contribution limits to a SIMPLE IRA: in 2023, the annual limit is $15,500, with an additional $3,500 in catch-up contributions permitted for people over age 50. In 2024, the annual limit is $16,000, with an additional $3,500 in catch-up contributions permitted for people over age 50.

Benefits and Drawbacks of SIMPLE IRAs

It’s important to understand both the benefits and downsides of the SIMPLE IRA to make an informed decision about retirement plans.

SIMPLE IRA Benefits

There are several benefits — for both employers and employees — to choosing a SIMPLE IRA:

•   For employers, it’s easy to set up and manage, with online set-up available through most banks.

•   For employers, management costs are low compared to other retirement plans.

•   For employees, taxes on contributions are deferred until the money is withdrawn.

•   Employers can take tax deductions on contributions. Sole proprietors can deduct both salary and matching contributions.

•   For employees, there is an allowable catch-up contribution for those over 50.

•   For employers, the IRA plan providers send tax information to the IRS, so there is no need to do any reporting.

•   Employers and employees can choose how the money in the account gets invested based on what the plan offers. Options may include mutual funds aimed toward growth or income, international mutual funds, or other assets.

SIMPLE IRA Drawbacks

Although there are multiple benefits to a SIMPLE IRA, there are some downsides as well:

•   Employers must follow strict rules set by the IRS.

•   Other employer-sponsored retirement accounts have higher limits, such as the 401(k), which allows for $22,500 per year in 2023 and $23,000 in 2024. (Check out our IRA calculator to see what you can contribute to each type of IRA.)

•   If account holders withdraw money before they reach age 59 ½, they must pay a 10% fee and income taxes on the withdrawal. That penalty jumps to 25% if money is withdrawn within two years of an employer making a deposit.

•   There is no option for a Roth contribution to a SIMPLE IRA, which would allow account holders to contribute post-tax money and avoid paying taxes later.

Boost your retirement contributions with a 1% match.

SoFi IRAs now get a 1% match on every dollar you deposit, up to the annual contribution limits. Open an account today and get started.


Only offers made via ACH are eligible for the match. ACATs, wires, and rollovers are not included.

What Is a Traditional IRA?

The Traditional IRA is set up by an individual to contribute to their own retirement. Employers are not involved in Traditional IRAs in any way. The main requirements to open an IRA are that the account holder must have earned some income within the past year, and they must be younger than 70 ½ years old at the end of the year.

Pros and Cons of Traditional IRAs

When it comes to benefits and downsides, there’s not too much of a difference between Traditional vs. SIMPLE IRAs, given what an IRA is. That being said, there are a few that are unique to this type of plan.

Traditional IRA Pros

Some of the upsides of a Traditional IRA include:

•   It allows for catch-up contributions for those over age 50.

•   One can choose how the money in the account gets invested based on what the plan offers. Options may include mutual funds aimed toward growth or income, international mutual funds, or other assets.

•   Contributions are tax-deferred, so taxes aren’t paid until funds are withdrawn. If you’re hoping to pay taxes now instead of later, you might weigh a Traditional vs. Roth IRA.

Traditional IRA Cons

Meanwhile, downsides to a Traditional IRA include:

•   They have much lower contribution limits than a 401(k) or a SIMPLE IRA, at $6,500 in 2023 and $7,000 in 2024.

•   Penalties for early withdrawal are also the same: if you withdraw money before age 59 ½, you’ll pay a 10% fee plus income taxes on the withdrawal.

Is a SIMPLE IRA or Traditional IRA Right for You?

The SIMPLE IRA and Traditional IRA are both individual retirement accounts, but the SIMPLE is set up through one’s employer — typically a small business of 100 people or less. The Traditional IRA is set up by an individual. In other words, whether a SIMPLE IRA is an option for you will depend on if you have an employer that offers it.

There are many similarities in the attributes of the plans, if you’re choosing between a SIMPLE IRA vs. Traditional IRA. However, two major distinctions are that the SIMPLE IRA requires employer contributions (though not necessarily employee contributions) and allows for a higher amount of employee contributions per year.

Can I Have Both a SIMPLE IRA and a Traditional IRA?

Yes, it is possible for an individual to have both a SIMPLE IRA through their employer and also a Traditional IRA on their own — though they may not be able to deduct all of their Traditional IRA contributions. The IRS sets a cap on deductions per calendar year.

In 2023, single people with an AGI (adjusted gross income) of more than $73,000 are restricted to a partial deduction; those with AGI above $83,000 may not take a deduction at all. Married couples filing jointly with an AGI of $116,000 to $136,000 may take a partial deduction; those with AGI above $136,000 may not take a deduction at all.

In 2024, single people with an AGI (adjusted gross income) of more than $77,000 are restricted to a partial deduction; those with AGI above $87,000 may not take a deduction at all. Married couples filing jointly with an AGI of $123,000 to $143,000 may take a partial deduction; those with AGI above $143,000 may not take a deduction at all.

Can You Convert a SIMPLE IRA to a Traditional IRA?

If you’re hoping to convert a SIMPLE IRA to a Traditional IRA, you’re in luck — you can roll over a SIMPLE IRA into a Traditional IRA. However, you can’t roll over the funds from a SIMPLE IRA to a Traditional IRA within the first two years of opening a SIMPLE IRA. Otherwise, you’ll get hit with a 25% penalty in addition to the regular income tax you must pay on your withdrawal.

Once that two-year period is up, however, you can roll over the money from your SIMPLE IRA — even if you’re still working for that employer. Just note that you can only roll over money from a SIMPLE IRA one time within a 12-month period.

Can You Max Out a Traditional and SIMPLE IRA the Same Year?

While you cannot max out a SIMPLE IRA and another employer-sponsored retirement plan like a 401(k), you can max out both a Traditional IRA and a SIMPLE IRA.

The maximum contribution for a SIMPLE IRA in 2023 is $15,500 (plus $3,500 in catch-up contributions), while the maximum for a Traditional IRA is $6,500 (plus $1,000 in catch-up contributions). This means that you could contribute a total of $22,000 across both plans in a year — or $26,500 if you’re 50 or older.

The maximum contribution for a SIMPLE IRA in 2024 is $16,000 (plus $3,500 in catch-up contributions), while the maximum for a Traditional IRA is $7,000 (plus $1,000 in catch-up contributions). This means that you could contribute a total of $23,000 across both plans in a year — or $27,500 if you’re 50 or older.

Are SIMPLE IRAs Most Similar to 401(k) Plans?

There are a lot of similarities between SIMPLE IRAs and 401(k) plans given that they are both employer-sponsored retirement plans. However, while any employer with one or more employees can offer a 401(k), SIMPLE IRAs are reserved for employers with 100 or fewer employees. Additionally, contribution limits are lower with SIMPLE IRAs than with 401(k) plans.

Another key difference between the two is that while employers can opt whether or not to make contributions to employee 401(k), employer contributions are mandatory with SIMPLE IRAs. On the employer side, SIMPLE IRAs generally have fewer account fees and annual tax filing requirements.

Opening an IRA With SoFi

Understanding the differences between retirement accounts like the SIMPLE and Traditional IRA is one more step in creating a personalized retirement plan that works for you and your goals. While a SIMPLE IRA is only an option if your employer offers it, you’ll want to weigh the pros and cons of a SIMPLE IRA vs. Traditional IRA if both are on the table for you. As we’ve covered, the two types of IRAs share many similarities, but a SIMPLE IRA is not the same as a Traditional IRA.

If you’re looking to start saving for retirement now, or add to your investments for the future, SoFi Invest® online retirement accounts offer both Traditional and Roth IRAs that are simple to set up and manage. By opening an IRA with SoFi, you’ll gain access to a broad range of investment options, member services, and a robust suite of planning and investment tools.

Find out how to further your retirement savings goals with SoFi Invest.

FAQ

Do you pay taxes on SIMPLE IRA?

Yes, you will pay taxes on a SIMPLE IRA, but not until you withdraw your funds in retirement. You’ll generally have to pay income tax on any amount you withdraw from your SIMPLE IRA in retirement. However, if you make a withdrawal prior to age 59 ½, or if money is withdrawn within two years of an employer making a deposit, you’ll have to pay income taxes then, alongside an additional tax penalty.

Is a SIMPLE IRA better than a Traditional IRA?

When comparing a SIMPLE IRA vs. traditional IRA, it’s important to understand that each has its pros and cons. If your employer offers a SIMPLE IRA, they require employer contributions, and they have higher contributions. At the end of the day, though, both allow you to save for retirement through tax-deferred contributions.


SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

SOIN0323009

Read more
apple cut in half

Guide to Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) Investing

What Is ESG?

ESG, which stands for environmental, social, and governance factors, refers to non-financial criteria that investors can use to determine whether companies are socially and environmentally responsible.

ESG investing is considered a form of sustainable or impact investing, but the term itself is more specific to emphasize that companies must focus on positive results in these three areas.

There is, however, no universally shared set of ESG criteria used by all investors or financial firms to evaluate a company’s soundness or risk along these lines. Rather, investors must learn which standards a certain fund or stock adheres to before choosing to invest.

Even so, there has been growing interest in ESG strategies in the last decade, as many of these funds have shown themselves to offer competitive returns vs. traditional strategies.

Breaking Down the 3 ESG Factors

The following are some of the common factors that investors consider when evaluating the three different ESG areas.

Environmental

The environmental component of ESG criteria might include metrics on a company’s energy emissions, waste, and water usage. Investors may also focus on the risks and opportunities associated with the impacts of climate change on the company and its industry.

Some company information that environmentally conscious investors may evaluate include:

•   Pollution and carbon footprint

•   Water usage and conservation

•   Renewable energy integration (such as solar and wind)

•   Climate change policies

💡 Recommended: How to Invest in EV Stocks

Social

The social component of ESG generally describes the impact of a company’s relationships with people and society. Factors as varied as corporate culture, commitment to diversity, and how much a company invests in local organizations or communities can impact socially conscious investors’ decisions on buying into a specific corporation.

Some other social factors can include:

•   Employee pay, benefits, and perks

•   Diversity, equity, and inclusion

•   Commitment to social justice causes

•   Ethical supply chains (e.g., no sweatshops, conflict-free minerals, etc.)

Governance

The governance component of ESG generally focuses on how the company is run. Investors want to know how the board of directors, company, and shareholders relate to one another.

Some additional governance factors that investors evaluate include:

•   Executive compensation, bonuses, and perks

•   Diversity of the board of directors and management team

•   Transparency in communications with shareholders

•   Rights and roles guaranteed to shareholders

What Is ESG Investing?

As discussed, investors use ESG criteria to screen potential investments; if a business’s operations don’t follow ESG standards, investors may avoid putting money into the company. In that sense, ESG investing can be seen as a type of socially responsible investing.

But, as mentioned above, there is no universal set of standards for what makes a company ESG friendly. Companies committed to ESG operations may publish sustainability reports to give investors some insights into the firm. Additionally, third-party organizations have stepped in to create ESG scores for companies and funds based on their adherence to various ESG factors.

How ESG Scores Work

ESG scores — sometimes called ESG ratings — are designed to measure a company’s performance based on specific environmental, social, and governance criteria. Investors can use them to assess a company’s success, risks, and opportunities concerning these three areas.

An ESG score is typically calculated by analyzing a company’s available data on environmental, social, and governance policies and practices using various sources, like SEC filings, government databases, and media reports.

A high ESG score means a company manages ESG risks better than its peers, while a low ESG score means the company has more unmanaged ESG risks. Evaluating a company’s ESG score, along with financial analysis, can give investors a better idea of the company’s long-term prospects.

Some of the most prominent ESG score providers are MSCI, Morningstar Sustainalytics, and S&P Global. But some financial firms conduct their own ESG evaluations and provide proprietary scores. Transparency into how the scores are calculated can vary.

ESG vs SRI vs Impact Investing

ESG investing is sometimes called sustainable investing, impact investing, or socially responsible investing (SRI). However, impact investing and socially responsible investing are often viewed differently than ESG investing.

Some of the differences between the three investment strategies are:

•   ESG investing focuses on a company or fund’s environmental, social, and governance practices and traditional financial analysis.

•   Socially responsible investing eliminates or selects investments according to specific ethical guidelines. Investors following an SRI strategy may avoid investing in companies related to gambling and other sin stocks, or they may avoid companies that cause damage to the natural environment — or both.

•   Impact investing is generally done by institutional investors and foundations. Impact investing focuses on making investments in companies or projects specifically designed to generate positive social or environmental impact.

In addition there is another designation investors may want to know, green investing refers to strategies that are purely focused on benefiting the environment.

Last, corporate social responsibility initiatives, or CSR refers to programs and initiatives that organizations may establish on their own. Often, these business decisions support socially responsible movements, like environmental sustainability, ethical labor practices, and social justice initiatives.

Get up to $1,000 in stock when you fund a new Active Invest account.*

Access stock trading, options, auto investing, IRAs, and more. Get started in just a few minutes.


*Customer must fund their Active Invest account with at least $25 within 30 days of opening the account. Probability of customer receiving $1,000 is 0.028%. See full terms and conditions.

What Are ESG Standards?

As noted, ESG standards vary depending on the entity or organization who has established the standards. As an example, here is a breakdown of the types of standards being used to evaluate companies in the ESG space.

Environmental Standards

A company may:

•   Publish reports detailing pollution emissions, energy use, management of harmful or toxic chemicals.

•   State criteria or benchmarks for emissions and pollutants

•   Uses renewable energy sources

•   Reduces waste

•   Maintains clean water standards

Social

A company may:

•   Embrace policies around fair wages

•   Work toward an ethical supply chain

•   Encourage all forms of diversity

•   Has policies to prevent and address sexual misconduct

•   Avoids vendors with questionable workplace safety or that employ child labor, especially from partners abroad

•   Adheres to data privacy

•   Supports the local community

Governance

A company may:

•   Establish a code of ethics for its leadership

•   Adhere to diversity standards for its board of directors

•   Foster corporate transparency around political contributions and more

•   Embrace policies that prevent fraud

Why Is ESG Investing Important?

ESG investing is important because it offers investors a way of putting their money into causes that are significant to them, with the hope of having a genuine impact via their investments in certain companies or funds. This is why ESG is often called impact investing, although true impact investing is a broader term, and refers to a range of companies that may or may not be focused on sustainable issues.

Whether or not companies or funds that embrace ESG strategies deliver on the promised goals is a matter for investors to decide via due diligence. As noted above, without a commonly agreed-upon set of standards and some form of accountability, it’s difficult to ascertain which companies are truly having an impact.

Are ESG Strategies Profitable?

Nonetheless, investors have continued to be interested in ESG strategies. In 2021, socially responsible U.S. mutual funds saw record inflows of some $70 billion — a 36% increase over 2020. ESG funds saw substantial outflows through 2021 and most of 2022. But sustainable funds still managed to outperform non-sustainable funds through Q3 of 2022, despite challenging market conditions, according to Morningstar research as of September 30, 2022.

During the third quarter of 2022, sustainable large-cap funds netted $525 million, versus their unsustainable equity peers, who lost $25 billion that period.

Two other studies from Morningstar added to the evidence that funds which embrace socially responsible investing strategies tend to outperform conventional mutual funds.

Their “Sustainable Funds U.S. Landscape Report” from February 2022 found that “two thirds of sustainable offerings in the large-blend category topped the U.S. market index last year compared with 54% of all funds in the category.”

According to the report: “There are 5 times as many sustainable funds in the U.S. today than a decade ago, and 3 times more than five years ago.”

Types of ESG Investments

Investors can make ESG investments in the stocks and bonds of companies that adhere to ESG criteria or have high ESG scores. Other potential investment vehicles are mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs) with an ESG strategy.

Stocks

Buying stocks of companies with environmental, social, and governance commitments can be one way to start ESG investing. However, investors will often need to research companies that have ESG credibility or rely on third-party agencies that release ESG scores.

💡 Recommended: How to Analyze a Stock

Bonds

The bonds of corporations involved in ESG-friendly business practices can be a good option for investors interested in fixed-income securities. Green and climate bonds are bonds issued by companies to finance various environmentally-friendly projects and business operations.

Additionally, government bonds used to fund green energy projects can be an option for fixed-income investors. These bonds may come with tax incentives, making them a more attractive investment than traditional bonds.

💡 Recommended: How to Buy Bonds: A Guide for Beginners

Mutual Funds and ETFs

Investors who don’t want to pick individual stocks to invest in can always look to mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that provide exposure to ESG companies and investments.

A growing number of index funds invest in a basket of sustainable stocks and bonds. These funds allow investors to diversify their holdings by investing in one security.

However, not all ESG funds follow the same criteria and may focus on different aspects of environmental, social, and governance issues. Interested investors would do well to look under the hood of specific funds to evaluate their holdings and other criteria.

💡 Recommended: A Beginner’s Guide to Investing in Index Funds

Identifying ESG Companies

What is the best way to find an ESG company? There are a number of resources available for ESG investors, including proprietary tools that allow investors to search and/or evaluate different stocks based on specific criteria.

There are also a number of lists published by financial media companies that evaluate companies and funds according to ESG criteria.

Financial ratings firms like Morningstar publish regular research reports on different aspects of the ESG sector.

In addition, many industry firms and fund-providers have their own proprietary evaluation methods that investors might consider. Here are five of the biggest companies that provide ESG ratings, according to Fortune.com.

•   FTSE Russell: Publishes ESG ratings on 7,200 securities

•   ISS ESG: Provides ratings on 11,800 issuers and 25,000 funds

•   MSCI: Publishes ESG ratings for over 8,000 companies worldwide

•   Refinitiv: Calculates ESG scores on 11,800 companies

•   Sustainalytics: Publishes ESG ratings on more than 13,000 companies

Benefits of ESG Investing

ESG investing has several benefits, including:

•   Improving long-term financial performance: A growing body of evidence suggests that companies with solid ESG ratings may be good investments. They tend to outperform those with weaker ratings, both in share price performance and earnings growth.

•   Mitigating risk: ESG factors can help identify companies with poor governance practices or exposure to environmental and social risks, leading to financial losses.

•   Creating social and environmental impact: By investing in companies that are leading the way on environmental, social, and governance issues, investors can help drive positive change and make a positive impact on society.

These potential benefits are increasing the popularity of ESG investing. According to Bloomberg, global ESG assets may surpass $41 trillion by the end of 2022 and reach $50 trillion by 2025, up from $22.8 trillion in 2016.

Risks of ESG Investing

The main disadvantage of ESG strategies is that they limit the number of investments that people can consider. Thus, some investors may end up trading potential returns for the ability to invest according to their values.

In addition, ESG investments can sometimes come with higher costs, for example an ESG fund may have a higher expense ration vs. a traditional counterpart.

While there is a growing body of data regarding the performance of ESG indices and securities, it’s still a relatively new sector relative to more traditional investments.

Starting an ESG Investment Portfolio

If you’re interested in creating an ESG portfolio, you can start by contacting a financial advisor who can help you shape your investment strategy.

However, if you are ready to start investing and want to build a portfolio on your own, you can follow these steps:

•   Open a brokerage account: You will need to open a brokerage account and deposit money into it. Once your account is funded, you will be able to buy and sell stocks, mutual funds, and other securities.

•   Pick your assets: Decide what type of investment you want to make, whether in a stock of a company, an ESG-focused ETF or mutual fund, or bonds.

•   Do your research: It’s important to research the different companies and funds and find a diversified selection that fits your desires and priorities.

•   Invest: Once you’re ready, make your investment and then monitor your portfolio to ensure that the assets in your portfolio have a positive social and financial impact.

It is important to remember that you should diversify your portfolio by investing in various asset classes. Diversification will help to reduce your risk and maximize your returns.

ESG Investing Strategies

ESG investing can be different based on values and financial goals. It’s therefore essential to start with your investment goals and objectives when crafting an ESG investing strategy. Consider how ESG factors can help you achieve these goals.

It’s also crucial to understand the data and information available on ESG factors; this will vary by company and industry. When researching potential ESG investments, you want to make sure a company has a clear and publicly-available ESG policy and regularly discloses its ESG performance. Additionally, it can be helpful to look at third-party scores to determine a company’s ESG performance.

The Takeaway

In recent years, investor interest in sustainable investing strategies like ESG has grown. In addition, there is some data that suggests that ESG strategies may be just as effective as traditional strategies in terms of performance.

This is despite the fact that ESG criteria are inconsistent throughout the industry. There are a myriad different ways that companies can provide ESG-centered investments, but there aren’t industry-wide benchmarks for different criteria or success metrics.

Thus, it’s fair to say that there is no “right” way to invest in ESG companies. What matters most is that you have done your own research; you are comfortable with the companies you are investing in; and you believe in their ability to create long-term value.

Investors interested in making ESG investments can use the SoFi app to help. When you open an Active Invest account with SoFi Invest®, you can trade stocks and ETFs to build an ESG portfolio. SoFi doesn’t charge commissions (although operating expense ratios and other fees may apply to exchange-traded funds), and SoFi members have access to complimentary advice from financial professionals.

For a limited time, opening and funding an Active Invest account gives you the opportunity to get up to $1,000 in the stock of your choice.

FAQ

What are the three pillars of ESG?

ESG stands for three areas that some companies strive to embrace by being proactive about the environment, supportive of social structures, and transparent and ethical in corporate leadership.

What are some examples of ESG investing?

There are countless ways to add ESG strategies to your portfolio: You can consider investing in green bonds, in companies that focus on environmentally supportive technologies, in funds that invest in a multitude of renewable energy companies, clean water initiatives, carbon sequestration, and more.

What is the difference between ESG and sustainability?

Sustainability is a broader term. Environmental, social, and governance factors may support sustainability in different ways: by limiting air or water pollution, by supporting fair labor practices, by insisting on transparency in corporate governance.


SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs): Investors should carefully consider the information contained in the prospectus, which contains the Fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other relevant information. You may obtain a prospectus from the Fund company’s website or by email customer service at [email protected]. Please read the prospectus carefully prior to investing.
Shares of ETFs must be bought and sold at market price, which can vary significantly from the Fund’s net asset value (NAV). Investment returns are subject to market volatility and shares may be worth more or less their original value when redeemed. The diversification of an ETF will not protect against loss. An ETF may not achieve its stated investment objective. Rebalancing and other activities within the fund may be subject to tax consequences.


Investment Risk: Diversification can help reduce some investment risk. It cannot guarantee profit, or fully protect in a down market.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

SOIN1122025

Read more
TLS 1.2 Encrypted
Equal Housing Lender