How To Counter a Salary Offer (Sample Emails)

How To Counter a Salary Offer (Sample Emails)

Salary negotiations can be one of the most stressful parts of the hiring process. You don’t want to offend your new employer but you don’t want to get shortchanged either. Making an appropriate counteroffer requires a little skill and finesse to communicate your salary needs in a professional way.

That’s where knowing how to write a salary counter offer email comes in. A good counter offer email can help you build a stronger case for why you deserve a higher salary.

What Is a Counteroffer?

A counteroffer is your response to the hiring company’s original salary offer. When you make a counteroffer, you’re asking the company to reconsider their initial offer and bump the number. For example, if a company offers you a starting salary of $80,000, you might counter that with $85,000 or $90,000.

Making a counteroffer is not uncommon, and some companies expect new hires to do a little bargaining for higher pay. It’s something you might be encouraged to do if you’re reading through first job tips to prepare for your job search. There’s no guarantee that a counteroffer will be accepted, but it’s still worth making one if you believe that you can get a better deal.

Writing a counter offer email can be a great way to communicate what you’re hoping to get. If you’re getting hired at your first job, you might not know how to write a counter offer salary email. The good news is that it’s not as complicated as you might think.

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When To Counter a Salary Offer

There are different reasons that a job candidate might decide to make a salary counter offer. Here are some of the most common scenarios when a counteroffer can be appropriate:

•   The company is offering a salary that’s below average for the industry.

•   You believe that your skills and/or experience are sufficient to command a higher salary.

•   The salary isn’t enough to meet your financial needs.

•   You’ve received a higher offer from a competing company.

If you’re negotiating salary for your first job, it’s important to find out what is competitive pay for this type of job and for someone with your experience?

Entry level salaries are naturally lower than salaries for people with more experience or education. That doesn’t mean, however, that you should automatically accept a lower salary for an entry level position if similar companies are paying more.

Researching pay ranges for the type of job you’re accepting can help you determine the high and low figures for a salary negotiation. It may also be helpful to know what trades make the most money and how much people earn at different levels within that trade or sector.

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Keys To Asking for More Salary

There’s some groundwork that goes into negotiating higher pay, either as a new hire or an employee seeking a raise. Here are some of the most important things to consider when asking for more pay:

•   Research average salaries across your industry for employees with skills or experience equivalent to yours

•   Know what you bring to the table, and be prepared to back that up with examples

•   Be confident in your approach

•   Be realistic and understand what the company can reasonably afford to offer you

Making your request for a salary increase in writing is also important, as it gives you an opportunity to outline in detail your reasoning for a pay boost. That’s where knowing how to write counter offer salary email messages comes in handy.

Should You Negotiate Your Job Offer (Even If It’s Already Pretty Good?)

Negotiating salary or other benefits isn’t something you necessarily have to do. And it’s possible that you might feel a little awkward asking your new employer for more money right off the bat. But it may still be worth negotiating certain aspects of your pay or benefits if you think there’s some wiggle room.

For example, you might be willing to accept a lower offer in exchange for stock if you think the company’s value is only going to rise in the future. One of the advantages of buying company stock through your employer is that you may be able to get it at a discounted price.

Tuition repayment assistance is something else that may be worth negotiating if you’re starting your career with student loans in tow. Employers are increasingly offering help with student loan debt and tuition to attract and retain talented employees. That type of benefit may be well worth negotiating if your company is open to the idea.

A signing bonus can also help balance out a lower salary. If the bonus is particularly lucrative, that might be a tempting reason to skip salary negotiations. Of course, you’ll want to brush up on the basics of how to ask for a signing bonus before you start negotiating.

Should You Negotiate Your Salary Through Email or a Phone Call?

If you’re interested in attempting to wrangle a higher salary from your employer, choose your approach carefully. Asking for a salary increase over the phone has its pros and cons. Your employer might feel like they’ve been put on the spot. Or you might be so nervous that you stumble over your words and don’t communicate your request clearly.

Putting your request in writing can take the pressure off both sides. It may be easier for you to explain why you feel you deserve a higher salary in writing and you can take your time with writing your email. You can expand on how you believe you’ll be able to help the company and why making a bigger investment in your salary is justified. You can also use your email to compare the salary offer to industry averages in order to underscore your case.

An email also gives your employer a chance to review your arguments and make a decision without feeling rushed. And should they decide to counter your counteroffer, they may prefer sending it back to you in email format so there’s a paper trail of all salary discussions.

Steps To Making a Salary Counteroffer

Countering an employer’s salary offer can be nerve-racking, so it’s wise to have a plan or strategy going in. We’ve put together a helpful checklist for what to do when entering salary negotiations.

Research Comparable Salaries

As mentioned, it’s important to know what the average pay is for the industry and type of job you’re accepting. You don’t want to make a counteroffer that’s too far outside the norm of what employees with your same skill set and level of experience are making, as that can cause the employer to balk.

Wage data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics is a good place to start your research. You can also check salaries on sites like Payscale.com or Salary.com to see what kind of entry-level pay competitive companies are offering.

Review the Benefits Package

Before negotiating salary, it’s helpful to look at everything an employer is offering. That might include things like subsidized health insurance, a solid retirement plan, paid time off, stock options, tuition assistance, or a remote work option. Weighing the value of those benefits against salary can help you decide if it’s worth negotiating your pay.

If you’re offered great benefits but a lower salary, getting a second job can help bridge the gap. You may already have experience with making money on the side if you’ve ever held any jobs that pay for college, like babysitting, dog-walking, or doing gig work.

Know Your Value

A little self-awareness goes a long way. When you’re applying for your first job, you may not have a lot of professional experience under your belt yet. Instead, you can focus more on your college accomplishments, skills, personality traits, and other qualities that make you an attractive candidate for the job.

Take Time To Craft Your Counteroffer

The next step is the most important, because you need to make sure you’re wording your counteroffer salary email carefully to convey what you want in a respectful way. You’ll want to start your email with a polite introduction and state your request briefly at the beginning. Then go into more detail explaining why you believe your counteroffer is appropriate, and close the letter politely. It’s also important to verify to whom you should send the email to ensure it gets to the right place.

Negotiate With Your Employer

Once your employer receives your salary counteroffer email, they’ll review it and then respond. Their immediate response may be no, at which point you’ll have to decide if you want to continue attempting to negotiate. If they’re willing to negotiate, you can then begin salary discussions to see if you can reach an agreement that suits you both. Being willing to compromise here is important, as coming on too strongly could cause the employer to rescind your offer and hire someone else.

Make Your Final Decisions

Once you’ve completed salary negotiations, your employer may give you a little more time to make up your mind. At this point, you’ll have to decide whether to accept their final salary offer or move on to another job. (By the way, hold onto the offer email — it can serve as proof of income for student loans and apartment applications.)

You may want to review your finances before deciding if the salary is acceptable. Using a free budget app can help you get a better sense of what kind of income you need to cover your spending.

If you decide to decline, you’ll want to do so politely. Burning bridges is a bad idea, in case you later apply for a position with the same company.

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Salary Counteroffer Email (Sample Templates)

If you’ve never attempted to write a counteroffer before, you may not know what your letter should include. To make things easier, here are guides for how to write a counteroffer email for salary in different situations.

Requesting Additional Compensation (Sample Email)

Dear [Hiring Manager],

Thank you for extending an offer at [company name] for the position of [position]. This is a very exciting opportunity, and I’m confident that I’ll be able to make a positive contribution to the team.

I’d like to ask if there’s room to negotiate the base salary for the role. According to my research, the industry average for this position is [range to range] for someone with experience and skills comparable to mine. I believe that a salary closer to [$$$] would be more appropriate, given my background and the requirements the role entails.

Please advise as to whether you’re open to discussing this at your earliest convenience.

Thank you and I look forward to your response.

Sincerely,
[Your name]

Responding to a Lowball Offer (Sample Email)

Dear [Hiring Manager],

Thank you for extending an offer at [company name] for the position of [position]. This is a very exciting opportunity, and I’m confident that I’ll be able to make a positive contribution to the team.

I’d like to ask if there’s room to negotiate the base salary for the role, as it seems to be lower than the average salary typically offered for this type of position. According to my research, the industry average for this position is [range to range] for someone with experience and skills comparable to mine. I believe that a salary closer to [$$$] would be more appropriate, given my background and the requirements the role entails.

Please advise as to whether you’re open to discussing this at your earliest convenience.

Thank you and I look forward to your response.

Sincerely,
[Your name]

Leveraging a Competitor Offer (Sample Email)

Dear [Hiring Manager],

Thank you for extending an offer at [company name] for the position of [position]. This is a very exciting opportunity, and I’m confident that I’ll be able to make a positive contribution to the team.

I’d like to ask if there’s room to negotiate the base salary for the role, as I’m currently considering an offer from another company. They’re offering a base salary of [$$$] along with a competitive benefits package that includes [list of benefits].

I’m very interested in accepting the offer to work at [your company] if you’d be able to [match or increase] the base salary. Please advise as to whether you’re open to discussing this at your earliest convenience.

Thank you and I look forward to your response.

Sincerely,
[Your name]

Accepting the Offer (Sample Email)

Dear [Hiring Manager],

I’m pleased to accept the offer for the position of [position name] with [company name] that was extended on [date]. I’m looking forward to working with the team, and I appreciate the opportunity to negotiate a compensation and benefits package that is agreeable to all parties involved.

Per our negotiations, I understand that my starting salary will be [$$$] and that my benefits package will include [list of benefits]. I look forward to beginning work on [date].

Many thanks,
[Your name]

Rejecting the Offer (Sample Email)

Dear [Hiring Manager],

Thank you for extending an offering of employment at [company name]. I’ve enjoyed getting to know you throughout the hiring process, and I appreciate your willingness to consider my request for salary negotiation.

At this time, I must respectfully decline the position. I thank you again for the opportunity to discuss the job, and I regret that we were unable to reach a compromise suitable to all parties involved.

I do hope that you’ll find a suitable candidate for the position.

Kind regards,
[Your name]

The Takeaway

It’s natural to want to be paid what you’re worth, and negotiating your salary may be necessary to get what you want when accepting a job offer. You’ll want to research competitive salaries for your industry and type of job, and also consider the full benefits package. In email communications with your potential employer, it’s important to always be polite, professional, concise, and confident.

Using a free money tracker like SoFi Relay can be a great way to take control of your finances. With Relay, you can get a complete financial snapshot, track your expenses, and monitor your credit right from your mobile device.

Get Relay and simplify your financial life.

FAQ

How do you politely negotiate salary via email?

Politely negotiating salary via email comes down to using respectful language and clearly explaining your needs and expectations. You want to state your case clearly and simply, then allow your employer time to form a response.

How do you politely counter a salary offer?

Countering a salary offer politely means making your case for better pay firmly but respectfully. You want to ensure that you’re directing your counteroffer to the right person and explaining your reasoning behind for asking for higher pay.

How do you negotiate salary after receiving a job offer?

Once you receive a job offer, you can review the terms and draft a short email to ask if the employer is willing to consider salary negotiations. You then have to wait for their response to see if they’re open to negotiating. If they are, you can make your salary counteroffer.


Photo credit: iStock/ibnjaafar

Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.
Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
SoFi’s Insights tool offers users the ability to connect both in-house accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score provided to you is a Vantage Score® based on TransUnion™ (the “Processing Agent”) data.
*Terms and conditions apply. (Must click on the link to be eligible.) This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the Rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed into SoFi accounts such as cash in SoFi Checking and Savings or loan balances, Stock Bits, fractional shares and cryptocurrency subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.
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Guide To Accepting a Job Offer via Email

Guide To Accepting a Job Offer via Email

You made it through the interview process and have an official job offer via email. But how do you accept an offer letter? Say yes right away, or take time to think it over? Should you talk to your new employer on the phone even if you received the offer by email?

Before you commit, you’ll want to make sure you take the right steps. Here’s a guide to help you navigate the process once that job offer appears in your inbox.

How To Accept a Job Offer

It’s important to know how to reply to your new employer in order to show them you’re a professional and reinforce their choice in hiring you. Accepting the job offer with clear, respectful communication helps make a good impression and establish a positive rapport from the beginning.

Whether or not the employer offers you the job by email or phone, the first thing to know is you don’t have to give a definitive answer right away. Employers realize a new hire may need time to mull it over. It’s perfectly okay to reply with, “Thank you for the offer. I really appreciate it. May I take the next day or two to think it over before I respond?” This is important, particularly if you want to prepare to discuss salary, bonuses, your title, or other company benefits such as health or employer-sponsored life insurance.

Unless it’s urgent for the employer to fill the position ASAP, they will most likely be fine with granting you two or three days to make your final decision. Try not to take too long, though. It’s best to stay within a 48-hour timeframe so you don’t leave them hanging.

Recommended: Does Net Worth Include Home Equity

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Evaluate the Job Offer

If you’re taking a couple of days to give your final answer, you’ll want to truly assess if this position is right for you. First, and probably most important, is evaluating the salary offer. Is what they’re paying enough for you to live on, or are you going to need a side hustle or a second job to make ends meet?

Another factor to consider is whether the offered income is commensurate with the job’s duties, responsibilities, and your experience. Researching similar positions in the industry can give you an idea if the company is offering competitive pay.

You’ll also want to make sure you’re satisfied with the benefits package, work hours, and vacation and sick time policies. Think about any other perks that may seal the deal such as college tuition assistance or an employer match on your 401(k) contribution.

Other factors you may want to evaluate include the work culture and environment. For example, if you tend to be more of an antisocial person and the company loves hosting afterwork happy hours or frequent team-building workshops, it might not be the best fit for you.

Lastly, think about your career trajectory and how this job might help move you forward. If it provides challenges, allows you to learn, and offers room for advancement, it may be a clear cut answer, especially if it’s your first job or you’re changing careers.

Questions To Ask the Employer Before Accepting a New Job

Before accepting an offer letter, make sure you get answers upfront to any questions you may have. During the time you’re evaluating your options, gather your thoughts and make a list of what you want to know. These queries can eliminate any doubts you might have, provide answers to questions you may not have asked during the interview, and prepare you for what to expect on your start date.

Asking important questions also clarifies what your role is, the company’s expectations of you, and in turn, what your expectations of the employer should be.

Some questions you may want to ask:

•   Is the salary negotiable?

•   When will I be eligible to receive benefits?

•   What types of employee savings plans are offered?

•   What types of pre-employment background checks or screening does the company do?

•   Who will I be reporting to?

•   What should I expect from the onboarding process?

•   What type of training will I receive?

•   Will I be expected to work late or on the weekends?

•   Does this position offer bonuses or commissions?

•   What’s the workplace dress code?

Negotiate the Job Offer

Seeing if there’s any wiggle room with certain aspects of the job is important before you make your official decision. For example, if the job doesn’t require you to be onsite every day, you might ask if you can work a hybrid schedule. Or perhaps there’s a possibility of a flexible schedule where you choose the 8 hour shift you want to work.

Although it can feel awkward and uncomfortable to bring it up, many employers actually expect potential new hires to bring up the salary subject. In fact, according to a poll by CareerBuilder, 73% of employers in the U.S. anticipate a salary negotiation upon the initial job offer. And bringing it up can literally pay off. A recent study by Fidelity Investments found 87% of young professionals aged 25 to 35 who negotiated their salary got at least some of what they asked.

(If you find yourself more interested in maximizing your income and managing your finances, a free budget app can help you get started.)

Talking to your new boss about salary before signing on may be the only time you’re in the driver’s seat in salary negotiations. Take advantage of this moment and the fact the employer wants you. Asking for more money, even if it’s for an entry-level salary, demonstrates you’re a confident, business-savvy professional who knows their worth.

If you want to negotiate the salary after you get the job offer, do your homework. Find out what salaries competitors are offering for someone with your skill set and experience, on such sites as Payscale.com, Glassdoor.com, or Salary.com. Set the bar high initially, asking for the top of your range, knowing you’ll probably end up somewhere in the middle between what you want and the maximum the employer is willing to go. Be prepared to give reasons as to why you should earn more, touting your experience, accomplishments, and the value you’ll bring to the company.

In the event you don’t get your desired salary, see if you can negotiate for other things that might make up for it, such as a signing bonus or employee stock options.

Recommended: Should You Take a Lower Offer in Exchange for Stock Options?

Accept the Job Offer Over the Phone

A phone call is a common way employers let the applicant know they’ve landed the job. When that call comes, you’ll want to be prepared to know exactly what to say.

If you’re offered the job by phone, first thank the caller, confirm you’re interested, and express your gratitude for the opportunity to fill the position. This gesture helps to establish a good relationship and lets the supervisor know you’re enthusiastic. A reply can be as simple as, “Thank you for extending this offer. I’m delighted and am excited by the opportunity to work with you and the company.”

At this time, you’ll want to ask the employer to send you the written offer letter or contract detailing the conditions of employment, salary information, job duties, and benefits. Once you get it, review it carefully to make sure the terms are acceptable, determine what you might want to negotiate, and look for any small details in fine print that may not have come up during the interview process.

Follow Up With an Email

The process for accepting a job through email closely follows the same protocol as by phone.

In an email, you’ll want to open with a thank you for considering you for the position and say you’re excited about the prospect of joining the team. Here’s the opening to request time to think about the offer, letting them know you have some questions, and inquiring when it may be possible to discuss them. The person will then set up a time to talk on the phone or by video chat, or might ask you to send your questions along in an email.

You should also ask for the written offer here too. If you’re recently out of school, your offer letter can serve as proof of income for student loan repayment plans and apartment applications.

Who Should You Email To Accept a Job Offer?

The person who officially offers you the job is the one to whom you should directly respond. At this point it will most likely come from the hiring manager or your future boss. Regardless, reply to the person sending the email. If there are cc’s, be sure to hit reply all to include those parties.

What To Include in a Job Offer Acceptance Letter

A job acceptance letter gives you the chance to document key points about your new job and clarify the terms of employment. Getting it in writing helps prevent future misunderstandings.

Your acceptance letter should include the following:

•   Thank you to the employer for offering you the position, stating the full job title.

•   A formal acceptance of the job offer.

•   Confirm the terms and conditions of employment: starting salary, health benefits, work hours, and start date.

•   Close by showing appreciation for the opportunity and your eagerness to join the company.

Advice on Writing a Job Offer Acceptance Letter

Don’t quickly jot off and send a job acceptance letter. Instead, carefully plan out what you want to say. Make sure it’s well-written, strikes a professional and polite tone, and covers all of the important bases. Be sure to proofread carefully for spelling and grammar errors before sending.

When composing the acceptance via email, create a concise subject line such as:

•   Acceptance of [Job Title] job offer – [Your name]

•   [Your Name] – [Job Title] job offer acceptance

Here are some sample templates to help you craft your response:

Job Offer Acceptance Letter Sample #1

Dear Ms. Jones,

Thank you for offering me the position of Account Executive with XYZ company. It is with great enthusiasm that I accept the job offer and look forward to starting employment with your company on [Month, Date, Year].

As we discussed, my starting salary will be $50,000 and health insurance benefits will be provided after 60 days of employment.

Please don’t hesitate to reach out at any time if there’s anything more you need from me.
Thank you again for giving me this wonderful opportunity. I am eager to join the team and make a positive contribution to the organization.

Sincerely,
Your signature
Typed name

Job Offer Acceptance Letter Sample #2

Dear Ms. Jones,

I am writing to confirm my acceptance of your job offer on [Date job was offered] and to let you know how delighted I am to be joining the XYZ company as an Account Executive. I believe I can make a valuable contribution to the company, and I am very grateful for the opportunity you have given me.

As discussed, my starting salary is $50,000 with the full range of benefits granted to your employees. My scheduled work hours are from 9:00am to 5:00pm, Monday through Friday. I will report to work on [Start date].

Thank you for the confidence you have expressed in me. I look forward to a long and productive career with XYZ company.

Sincerely,
Your signature
Typed name

Job Offer Acceptance Letter Sample #3

Dear Ms. Jones,

I was very excited to get your call and receive the job offer for the Account Executive position at XYZ company.

After reviewing the offer, I had a few questions I wanted to run by you — particularly about the base salary and the company’s benefits package. Would it be possible to arrange a phone call to discuss?

Thank you in advance for your help with this. I look forward to speaking to you again soon.

Sincerely,
Your signature
Typed name

What to Expect When Accepting a Job Offer

Once you and your new employer have hashed out any negotiated terms in your offer letter, ask them if anything else is needed from you prior to your first day. If you’re employed elsewhere, inform your current boss you’re leaving and set your termination date (typically two weeks after you give notice). You’ll also want to decide if you’re going to stay on COBRA if your new employer’s health benefits don’t kick in right away or how to roll over your 401(k) to the new job.

Your new workplace may require certain things before you start, including filling out paperwork and submitting documentation for your HR file, plus drug testing or a background check. There may be an orientation, training classes you’ll need to attend when you start, and an employee handbook to study.

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The Takeaway

Whether you’re offered a job by phone or email, it’s important to respond in a timely, professional manner, especially if you decide to take the position. But you don’t have to say yes immediately. It’s acceptable to ask the employer if you can have a couple of days to think about it before you can make a final decision. Depending on what the company is offering benefits- and salary-wise, you may want to come to the negotiating table with the employer to see how to maximize your situation.

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FAQ

What do you say when you accept a job offer?

Thanking the employer, letting them know you appreciate it, and communicate you’re excited about joining their company. Responding in an upbeat, positive way shows your enthusiasm and signals to the employer they made the right choice.

How do I accept an informal job offer?

You can accept the job offer over the phone or by email but follow the employer’s lead. If they call you, it’s best to respond in kind and accept it over the phone. In the case of an emailed job offer, you can send your response that way. Most likely, even if they offer you the job over email, the employer will follow up to solidify things verbally.

How do you say yes to a job offer?

Once you’ve sorted out any questions with the employer and completed any negotiations, ask for the offer in writing. Read it over carefully to ensure all of the details are correct. If everything is in order, you can send the email confirming your salary, your job title, start date, and any other agreed upon conditions. Be sure to thank them again and express again how much you’re looking forward to joining the team.


Photo credit: iStock/Tempura

SoFi’s Insights tool offers users the ability to connect both in-house accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score provided to you is a Vantage Score® based on TransUnion™ (the “Processing Agent”) data.
*Terms and conditions apply. (Must click on the link to be eligible.) This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the Rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed into SoFi accounts such as cash in SoFi Checking and Savings or loan balances, Stock Bits, fractional shares and cryptocurrency subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.
Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.
Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.
This article is not intended to be legal advice. Please consult an attorney for advice.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.
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What is a Good Salary for a Single Person Living in California for 2022

What Is a Good Salary for a Single Person Living in California for 2022

Calling California home can be expensive, and some locations carry a much higher cost of living than others. In fact, if you’re wondering where to live in the Golden State, your income may be the deciding factor. A good salary for a single person in California varies widely depending on location and industry: $50K may be enough in some areas, $100K in others.

Here, we’ll provide real-world stats to show you what the cost of living is really like. And we’ll compare annual salaries for different occupations to offer some insight into what a single Californian typically earns.

What Is the True Cost of Living in California?

California is the fourth most expensive state in the U.S., according to the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center (MERIC). Only Hawaii, Washington, D.C., and Massachusetts have a higher cost of living. Data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) calculated that the average annual cost of living in California is $46,636.

Average cost of living numbers reflect both the highs and lows of what people spend to live in California. Cost of living generally means necessary expenses, such as:

•   Housing

•   Food

•   Utilities

•   Transportation

•   Taxes

•   Health care

•   Child care

•   Clothing

•   Education

Where someone chooses to live in California and their lifestyle can influence their personal cost of living. Their choice of career can determine how easily they’re able to keep up with the cost of living. What is considered a good salary for a single person in a metro area may be very different from that of someone living in a farming community.

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What Is the True Cost of Living in Los Angeles?

Households in the Los Angeles metro area spent an average of $67,587 per year in 2019-20, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The majority of spending was divided across eight categories:

•   Housing

•   Transportation

•   Food

•   Personal insurance and pensions

•   Healthcare

•   Entertainment

•   Cash contributions

•   Apparel and services

More-recent data from the BLS shows that the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for goods and services in Los Angeles has more than doubled since 2019. Some of the biggest price increases have been in the food and energy categories. Meanwhile, the average weekly wage across all industries in Los Angeles was $1,698, which adds up to $88,296 in annual salary.

What Is the True Cost of Living in the San Francisco Bay Area?

Residents of the San Francisco Bay Area spent an average of $91,728 per year in 2019-20, according to BLS data. San Franciscans spent the most on housing, followed by:

•   Personal insurance and pensions

•   Food

•   Transportation

•   Healthcare

•   Cash contributions

•   Entertainment

•   Education

Similar to Los Angeles, San Francisco saw its consumer price index more than double between 2019 and 2022, with consumers paying more for food, medical expenses, and household furnishings. In terms of weekly salary, workers in the Bay Area bring in $2,696 on average, or $140,192 annually.

Why Is the Cost of Living in California So High?

California’s high cost of living can be attributed largely to supply and demand. Generally speaking, when demand for goods and services outpaces supply, that can result in higher prices.

High demand vs. low supply for things like housing, for instance, can send real estate values soaring. California is an attractive place to live because of its strong economy and job market, prompting more people to move there, driving up demand for housing. The state ranks fourth for the highest rent prices, and the typical home is valued at $775,876, according to Zillow.

Meanwhile, California residents are subject to higher property tax rates, which adds to the cost of living. They also typically pay more for fuel due to a combination of higher taxes and environmental regulation surcharges.

Inflation can add to the high cost of living in California. As of September 2022, the CPI increased 8.3% year over year. When inflation rises, everything you spend money on tends to become more expensive, driving up the cost of living even further.

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Living Wage Calculation for California

A living wage in California is the hourly rate that someone must earn to support themselves and their family, if they have one. It’s not the same thing as the federal minimum wage. The gap between the two is often used as an argument for raising the minimum wage across the board.

Here’s what an hourly living wage calculation looks like for different household sizes in California. Note that the state minimum wage for companies with 26 or more employees is $15.00 an hour.

1 Adult

2 Adults, Both Working

Number of Children 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3
Living Wage $21.82 $44.18 $54.95 $73.98 $16.79 $23.98 $30.54 $37.57

Data courtesy of the MIT Living Wage Calculator.

So what is a good annual salary for a single person in California? Using living wage data, you could assume that $45,385 in annual pay would be a good salary for a single person with no children. On the other hand, a single adult raising three kids would need to make $153,878 yearly. Those income numbers assume a 40-hour workweek and 52 weeks of work per year.

It’s important to understand the distinction between salary vs. hourly pay, in terms of how much work is involved to earn a living wage. A salaried employee who works 60 hours a week may end up earning the same average hourly wage as someone who works 40 hours per week, even though they’re spending more time on the job.

Typical Expenses

Comparing typical spending to living wage calculations can offer some perspective on how easily Californians are able to keep up with their cost of living. Here’s a closer look at what adults spend in several key budget categories.

1 Adult

2 Adults, Both Working

Number of Children 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3
Food $3,999 $5,893 $8,853 $11,742 $7,332 $9,124 $11,764 $14,321
Child Care $0 $11,439 $22,879 $34,318 $0 $11,439 $22,879 $34,318
Medical $2,288 $7,462 $7,249 $7,559 $5,764 $7,249 $7,559 $7,347
Housing $17,651 $25,624 $25,624 $34,798 $20,398 $25,624 $25,624 $34,798
Transportation $4,938 $8,762 $11,391 $13,456 $8,762 $11,391 $13,456 $14,613
Civic $2,581 $4,144 $5,120 $6,686 $4,144 $5,120 $6,686 $5,314
Other $4,748 $7,080 $6,477 $9,424 $7,080 $6,477 $9,424 $9,115

Data courtesy of the MIT Living Wage Calculator.

“Civic” refers to civic activities and includes costs related to entertainment, culture, pets, hobbies, and education.

Typical Annual Salaries in California

A good yearly salary for a single person in California varies widely, as does what is considered competitive pay. It mostly depends on the industry someone works in. Here’s an overview of annual salaries in California across different industries and sectors.

Occupational Area

Typical Annual Salary

Management $138,148
Business & Financial Operations $84,198
Computer & Mathematical $119,872
Architecture & Engineering $105,770
Life, Physical, & Social Science $91,100
Community & Social Service $58,272
Legal $117,935
Education, Training, & Library $64,168
Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, & Media $69,625
Healthcare Practitioners & Technical $105,245
Healthcare Support $33,159
Protective Service $52,280
Food Preparation & Serving Related $31,993
Building & Grounds Cleaning & Maintenance $37,461
Personal Care & Service $34,047
Sales & Related $38,049
Office & Administrative Support $46,994
Farming, Fishing, & Forestry $31,169
Construction & Extraction $62,681
Installation, Maintenance, & Repair $58,497
Production $40,168
Transportation & Material Moving $37,578

The highest paying jobs by state tend to be in the management, legal, technology, and healthcare fields. That makes sense, given how much big business and tech contribute to the state’s economy.

California’s large population also means greater demand for things like legal services and health care. These are not the best jobs for antisocial people, since they demand a good deal of interaction and communication, but that doesn’t mean introverts can’t find great opportunities here.

So, what is a good entry level salary in California? Entry level pay is likely to be higher in industries that have higher demand for talent. The downside is that hiring can be much more competitive.

New hires seeking jobs in the state may do well to read up on how to ask for a signing bonus or more perks in their benefits package, which can help supplement a lower entry level salary.

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Is the Cost of Living in California Worth It?

California is far from the cheapest state to live in. Whether it’s worth it to you to make your home there can depend on your reasons for wanting to live in the Golden State. If you’ve landed a high paying job in a promising field, for instance, then a higher cost of living might be a trade-off you can accept to launch your dream career.

On the other hand, you might find that California’s cost of living is simply too much for your budget. In that case, you might consider relocating to a less expensive state or, at the very least, moving to a different part of California.

Regardless of where you end up, using a budget planner app can be a great way to keep track of your spending. You can link the app to your bank accounts and credit cards to keep tabs on where your money goes and see at a glance where you might need to cut back. Maintaining a budget is one of the most effective ways to keep your cost of living under control.

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The Takeaway

What is a good yearly salary for a single person? The simplest answer might be this: An amount that allows you to meet all of your basic expenses, save a little, and pay down debt or work toward another financial goal. Whether that’s $50,000, $100,000, or more can depend on your preferred lifestyle and where you choose to live.

If you’re struggling to get a grip on spending, then using a money tracker app like SoFi Relay can help. Relay is an all-in-one financial tool for managing spending, monitoring your credit, and taking control of your money.

See the big picture on one mobile dashboard.

FAQ

What is a livable salary for a single person in California?

A living wage for a single person in California with no children is $21.82 per hour or $45,385 per year, assuming a 40-hour workweek. Whether that salary is livable for someone can depend on where they live in California and how they typically spend their money.

What is a comfortable salary in California?

The salary that’s required to live comfortably in California depends on how many people live in the household, how many people in the household earn an income, where you live in the state, and your typical annual expenses.

What is a good monthly income in California?

A good monthly income in California is $3,886, based on what the Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that Californians pay for their cost of living. A good monthly income for you will depend on what your expenses are and how much you typically spend per month.


Photo credit: iStock/lechatnoir

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9 Common Signs of Millionaires That Indicate You Are On Track to Becoming Wealthy

9 Common Signs of Millionaires That Indicate You Are On Track to Becoming Wealthy

If you are like many people, you may have asked yourself at some point in life, “Will I be rich one day?” No one knows for sure what the future holds, but there are a few things you can do to increase your chances of becoming a millionaire.

One of the best ways to amass wealth is to invest in assets that will appreciate over time. But while that sounds good, finding a starting point can be challenging for some. For example, you can start your own business or work hard to climb the corporate ladder, but which is the better option? And you’ll want to invest the money you earn. But where?

Whatever you do, it’s smart to remember that it’s okay to take risks and make mistakes; learning from your experiences is a critical component of success. Above all, remember that wealth accumulation is a marathon, not a sprint. It takes patience, commitment, and perseverance to achieve financial security.

What Is a Sign of Wealth?

Often, specific aspects of one’s physical appearance such as luxury cars and designer clothes are taken as a sign of wealth. Unfortunately, these signs aren’t always reliable. For example, some people may live in an extravagant home, giving off the appearance of wealth, but it may simply mean that they can access money — perhaps through credit, savings or even family.

Real signs of wealth are often more attitudinal, and many can be cultivated through patience and practice. Here are a few people who were early millionaires due, in large part, to their drive and focus.

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Examples of Millionaires Under 30

With the advent of the tech industry, smart investments, business ventures, or inheritances, i.e., the great wealth transfer , millionaires under 30 are becoming increasingly common. Here are three examples of millionaires who earned their fortunes before turning 30.

Mark Zuckerberg: Zuckerberg created Facebook at age 19 while attending Harvard University. The idea was to match photos with the names of other students. And in just a few short years, Zuckerberg became a self-made millionaire at age 22.

Sergey Brin: Brin is a Russian American computer scientist who, at the age of 25, co-founded Google, Inc., and became a millionaire. Google is one of the world’s most valuable companies, and today, Brin’s net worth is estimated to be $88 billion.

Alexander Wang: Wang founded Scale AI in 2016 as a way to analyze data far faster than any human could. Today, Scale AI’s technology is used by the U.S. Airforce and U.S. Army, as well as 300+ companies. Today, Wang’s net worth is estimated to be over $1 billion, and at age 25, he’s currently the youngest billionaire.

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9 Signs of Wealth to Look Out For

In a world where the top 1% of earners take home nearly 20% of the country’s income, it’s essential to know what signs to look for when trying to identify if someone is wealthy. While there’s no one-size-fits-all definition of wealth, some cues can give you a good idea of whether you or someone you know is doing well financially.

Here are six signs of wealth to look out for that indicate you’re on track to becoming wealthy:

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1. You’re an Overachiever

It’s hard to be modest when you’re an overachiever. You know you’re good at your work and are not afraid to let everyone know. Overachievers work hard and try harder. While this may make some people uncomfortable, it comes naturally to you.

2. You Started Making Money At a Young Age

It is not uncommon to see young adults with successful careers in today’s society. While some people played with toys as a child, others learned how to make money. For example, it could mean that you started a side hustle such as delivering a paper route or babysitting.

Regardless, making money at a young age, or any age for that matter, is not always easy. There’s no such thing as a free lunch, and people work hard for their money. An early start can put you on the fast track to becoming a millionaire.

3. You Take Action

There will be times when things happen that are out of your control. You may feel stuck and as if you have no way to change your circumstances. However, these are the times when you must take action to create the life you want to live. For example, it might mean organizing your finances to get what you want. And, sometimes you’ll have to take some risks and go for it. It can be scary, but it’s worth it to achieve your goals.

When faced with a difficult situation, it’s essential to remember that you always have a choice. You can choose to give up, or you can choose to fight for what you want. Only by taking action can you make progress and take a step towards achieving financial wellness. So don’t be afraid to step up and take on whatever life throws your way — you can do it!

4. You Are Outspoken

In a society where people get judged by how much money they have, it is no surprise that many go out of their way to keep up appearances. And while some may try to blend in with the wealthy crowd, a wealthy person will often stand out with his unique style or outgoing sense of humor. Wealthy people tend to feel less inhibited and are more likely to speak their minds. They may also be less concerned with the rules and more likely to take risks.

5. You Possess a Sense of Urgency

When it comes to the wealthy, there are a few telltale signs that set them apart. One of these is their sense of urgency — they don’t like wasting time and are always moving forward. This urgency allows them to achieve their goals and maintain their wealth. It’s also one of the reasons why they may seem constantly stressed out — they’re always trying to do more.

6. You’re Focused More on Saving Than Earning

It doesn’t matter if you earn $50,000 or $250,000 a year. Unless you consistently spend less than you make, you’ll never get ahead financially. People who focus on their budget and saving their disposable income understand how to live within their means and focus on what’s most important: saving money for the future.

7. You Know The Difference Between Needs & Wants

In our materialistic society, getting caught up in the “must-have” mentality is easy. Advertisements are everywhere, and social media posts tell us we need the next latest and greatest products. It can be challenging to discern between the things we need and want.

A sign of a wealthy person is their ability to distinguish between the two. They know which items are essential for their well-being and those which would be nice to have. Advertising or peer pressure doesn’t work on rich people, and their possessions don’t rule them.

Spiritual Signs You Will Be Rich

Are there spiritual signs that you can be a wealthy person? Some people believe steadfastly in spiritual and other signs of wealth and luck. Here are a couple of examples:

Gravitating to the Lucky Number, 8

In Chinese culture, the number 8 is considered a lucky number. Individuals who gravitate towards this number may believe it will bring them good fortune. Some people might even go as far as to change their phone number or social media handle to include the digit 8.

A Psychic Confirms Wealth is Coming

Some people consult psychics to get guidance on anything from love to health and even money. While many psychics will say they can tune into your energy and give you specific information about your future, and many people believe their predictions, you may be better off putting the money you’d pay the psychic into savings.

Pros and Cons of Having Signs of Wealth

There are very few times when it can be helpful to show off your wealth to others. Indeed, showing off can make others feel intimidated. Additionally, it can attract unwanted attention from criminals or others who want to take what you have. And, having too many signs of wealth can make you a target for scams or other fraudulent schemes.

Takeaway

If you identify with any of these habits you’re likely well on your way to building a significant amount of wealth. However, it is essential to remember that wealth accumulation is not a one-time event; it’s a way of life. It’s something you’ll need to make a habit of, if you want to succeed. For many people who work hard, stay focused, and are disciplined, it is possible.

And as you’re building your wealth, tracking your income and expenses is one of the primary ways to manage your money. SoFi Relay money tracker app can help you keep track of your funds so you can make the best spending decisions and start building your very own fortune today.


Photo credit: iStock/miniseries

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Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.
SoFi’s Insights tool offers users the ability to connect both in-house accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score provided to you is a Vantage Score® based on TransUnion™ (the “Processing Agent”) data.
*Terms and conditions apply. (Must click on the link to be eligible.) This offer is only available to new SoFi users without existing SoFi accounts. It is non-transferable. One offer per person. To receive the Rewards points offer, you must successfully complete setting up Credit Score Monitoring. Rewards points may only be redeemed into SoFi accounts such as cash in SoFi Checking and Savings or loan balances, Stock Bits, fractional shares and cryptocurrency subject to program terms that may be found here: SoFi Member Rewards Terms and Conditions. SoFi reserves the right to modify or discontinue this offer at any time without notice.
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23 Ways To Make Extra Income From Home

23 Ways To Make Extra Income From Home

If you’re interested in how to make extra income from home, today there are more opportunities than ever before. Some ways to earn extra income from home include side hustles, online businesses, and remote jobs. Finding the right money-making project for you just depends on your skills, experience, and interests.

We’re sharing some of the most popular ideas for how to bring in extra income from home in 2022 and beyond.

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How To Make Extra Income From Home

There are a variety of ways to make extra income from home, many of which allow you to use the skills you already have. Others may require a little training or research to get started before you can begin earning supplemental income.

When comparing side hustles, business ideas, and work-from-home second jobs for extra income, consider:

•   How much time is required to make money

•   Typical earnings and how much you can expect to make

•   What, if anything, might be required to get started

Timing can also influence the types of ideas you explore for making extra income from home. For example, if you need to make a quick $1,000, then selling things around the house can put cash in your pocket faster than starting an online business.

And remember, the benefits of a side hustle go beyond making extra income. Side gigs can be a creative outlet, source of fulfillment, or a stepping stone to a new career. With that in mind, here are 23 of the best extra income ideas from home.

Recommended: What To Do With Extra Money

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1. Tutor

Tutoring can be a fulfilling way to make extra income from home for stay-at-home parents or students. There are numerous websites that connect tutors with students who need help with their school work. You can also offer tutoring to students locally in your home to make extra income.

2. Online Teacher

Teaching online is another popular work-from-home extra income idea. While tutoring may involve working with a single student one-on-one, you might teach multiple students online at the same time. For example, anyone can sign up to teach K-12 classes live via Zoom on Outschool.com. You don’t need a teaching degree or previous experience, though you will need to be able to pass a background check.

3. Course Creator

Course creation is one of the best passive income ideas for people who like teaching but don’t want to do it all the time. Platforms like Udemy, Skillshare, and Teachable allow you to create and upload virtual courses then sell them to people online. These types of platforms charge fees to host your course, but if you come up with a popular topic or idea, you can easily make a great income from home teaching online.

4. Sell Artwork and Designs Online

Selling artwork and designs can be a great way to earn residual income from home. For example, you can create unique designs and license them to a platform like Canva or Creative Fabrica. You earn money as people purchase licensing rights to use your designs.

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5. Online Bookkeeper

Bookkeeping is an in-demand skill, and if you’re experienced at tracking accounts and managing financial statements, this can be a reliable way to make extra income from home. It’s possible to find virtual bookkeeping jobs online with companies that are interested in outsourcing their bookkeeping and payroll.

6. Low Content Book Publishing

Low-content books are books that have little to no content inside. Composition notebooks and blank journals are two prime examples of low-content books. If you have a knack for design, you can create low-content books and upload them to a self-publishing platform like Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP). Amazon lists your books for sale and handles the printing and shipping for you. Meanwhile, you earn royalties for each unit sold.

7. Affiliate Marketing

Affiliate marketing is another option for earning residual income or passive income from home. Affiliate marketing simply means recommending products or services and linking to a sales portal. If someone purchases the product or service through your link, you earn a commission. You can try affiliate marketing through a blog or social media channels such as Instagram or Twitter. Just keep in mind that the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has specific disclosure rules influencers are required to follow.

8. Copywrite or Edit

Copywriting is another high-demand skill as companies and businesses are often willing to pay good money for website or marketing copy. Editing is also something you might consider doing to make extra income from home if you’re skilled at writing and have a good eye for detail.

9. Data Entry

Work-from-home extra-income jobs in data entry might appeal to you if you’re good at typing and you know your way around databases or spreadsheets. It’s possible to find remote data entry jobs by searching job boards like Indeed.com or FlexJobs.

10. Start a YouTube Channel

YouTube is one of the most visible social media platforms. You might consider starting your own channel as a way to make extra income without leaving the house. To get started, you’ll need a decent camera and a great idea for content, and you’ll need to meet YouTube’s minimum requirements to monetize your channel with ads. You can also make money with a YouTube channel by selling digital products, creating sponsored content, and affiliate marketing.

11. Freelance Your Skills

Freelancing can span a wide range of work from home jobs for extra income. For example, you might work as a freelance photographer, website developer, or project manager. The great thing about freelancing is that you can apply skills that you already possess to make money while potentially increasing your income even more by learning new skills along the way.

12. Sell Your Photos

If you’re great with a camera, selling your photography is another idea for how to make extra income from home. Sites like Shutterstock, Foap, and SmugMug allow amateur and professional photographers to list photos for sale and earn money by selling licensing rights. You can study a range of websites that sell pictures to get an idea of which subjects are most popular and in-demand.

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13. Print on Demand

Print-on-demand is a terrific way to make passive income from home. With print-on-demand, you create unique designs and upload them to a POD shop. When someone buys an item, such as a coffee mug or tote bag, the POD shop prints your design onto it and ships it out to the customer. If you’re looking for a place to get started with print on demand, Redbubble, Society6, and Printify are a few sites you might consider.

14. Online Transcription

Transcriptionists make money by transcribing digital files into written or typed documents. Online transcription jobs can be a good way to put your typing skills to use, and there are even remote work opportunities out there for beginners. You may need to purchase special transcription software to start this work-from-home idea, but with the right gigs, you can easily make a part-time income from home.

15. Get Paid To Proofread

Proofreaders review written documents for spelling errors, grammatical errors, and typos. The work that they do is similar to copyeditors though it’s more focused on finding flaws in the mechanics of a piece of writing, rather than issues with tone or flow. Remote-work job boards can be a good place to begin looking for proofreading jobs for beginners.

16. Virtual Assistant

Virtual assistants help business owners run their companies. You might do a variety of things as a VA, including managing email, setting appointments, keeping track of scheduling changes, posting social media content, or copywriting. This is another low-cost side hustle you can start from home as long as you have an internet connection and a laptop.

17. Start a Blog

Blogging is not necessarily a way to get rich quick, but it can be a way of making extra money from home. There are different ways blogs can earn money, including ads, affiliate marketing, sponsored posts, product sales, and services. If you’re interested in starting a blog, you might want to spend some time on YouTube checking out tutorials to see what you’ll need to get up and running. And this is a good overview of the costs of running a blog.

18. Get Paid To Chat

Remote chat operator jobs and remote customer support jobs are a fun way to put your people skills to work while earning extra income from home. Plenty of companies hire people to handle customer support via live chat or by phone from the comfort of their own home. This can be a good flexible job option for a stay-at-home parent.

19. Pet Sit

Pet sitting might be a perfect way to earn extra income from home for you if you love cats or dogs. You can advertise your services locally as a pet-sitter or dog walker, and make money according to a schedule that works for you.

20. Earn Cash Back From Shopping Apps

Cash back apps pay you back a percentage of what you spend, either in cash or points that can be redeemed for cash or gift cards. For example, you might use a cash back app to earn 5% back when shopping for clothes at your favorite online retailer. Cash back apps are an easy way to make extra income from home doing things that you’re already spending time on.

21. Babysit in Your Home

In addition to pet-sitting, you might consider offering child care or senior care services in your home. If you’re planning to keep multiple children in your home, you’ll want to first check your state’s laws. Once you reach a certain number of children, you might be considered a daycare, which means you’ll need to get licensed and be regulated by the state.

22. Grow a Garden

Gardening can be a relaxing hobby, but it also has potential to be an excellent way to make extra income from home. You can sell the fruits and veggies that you grow at your local farmer’s market or to people in your neighborhood. Depending on where you live, you might even be able to branch out and raise chickens so you can sell fresh eggs for supplemental income.

23. Bake or Prep Meals

If you love to bake or are a pro at meal planning, you might be able to monetize those hobbies and skills to earn money at home. For example, you can sell your homemade baked goods at your local farmer’s market or craft fair, or to local restaurants. You can also sell readymade meals to busy parents and seniors who need a little help with cooking. Just be sure to check any regulations regarding home kitchens that might apply where you live.

Reporting Extra Income on Your Taxes

Finding ways to make extra income from home can offer some financial breathing room, but it’s important to consider the tax consequences. IRS rules require you to report side hustle income or money earned in the gig economy on your taxes, even if you make money at home. Generally, there are two rules to know about reporting extra income:

•   Form 1099 must be issued when gig earnings exceed $600

•   Gig workers may be required to pay estimated quarterly taxes

Unless you’re specifically hired as an employee of a company that you’re doing work for, then the IRS considers you to be an independent contractor. You’ll need to keep track of all your earnings throughout the year and make sure you’re reporting them accurately on your taxes when you file.

You’ll also want to include receipts for any expenses you might be able to deduct. For example, if you’re making extra income from home as a freelance writer and you need to buy a new laptop, you may be able to write that off as a business expense. Or you may be able to deduct home office expenses.

Downloading a free budget app can make it easier to keep track of your business or side gig expenses. If you’re unsure how to handle a tax return with extra income, you may want to talk to a tax professional.

The Takeaway

Making extra income is one of the main benefits of a side hustle, though you may also want to start a second job as a creative outlet. Today, there are many flexible work-from-home gigs for all sorts of skill sets and backgrounds. Some require training or certification, but many can be started with just a laptop and dream. Ideally, you can leverage a hobby or passion into a side job, such as meal-prep, pet-sitting, childcare, design and photography, and more.

If you need a little help staying on top of your side-hustle earnings, a money tracker app like SoFi Relay can help. With Relay, you can track expenses, get financial insights, and monitor your credit all in one place. It’s a simple but powerful tool for managing your finances.

Get Relay and take control of your money today.

FAQ

How can I make an extra $1,000 a month?

Some of the best ways to make an extra $1,000 a month are freelancing, blogging, monetizing a YouTube channel, and selling digital products. These are all extra income jobs that you can do entirely online. You may also be able to make an extra $1,000 a month by pet-sitting, making homemade baked goods, or selling things around the house you no longer need.

What can I do for an extra income?

There are lots of different ways to make extra income. You could start by increasing your hours at work if you get paid on an hourly basis. Or you might negotiate a pay raise at your current job. You can also get a second job, start a side hustle, get paid to do gig work, or start an online business.

What is a good side hustle?

The best side hustle for you is the one that works for your schedule and allows you to use the skills you have to make a good income. That said, good side hustle options include freelancing, editing and copywriting, blogging, and taking surveys online for cash or gift cards.


Photo credit: iStock/Alessandro Biascioli

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