How to Manage Multiple Credit Cards in 2023

How to Manage Multiple Credit Cards in 2024

Having multiple credit cards brings certain benefits. On average, Americans use two to three credit cards at a time, often to take advantage of various perks and rewards programs. Another reason to own multiple credit cards is they can boost your credit score when managed sensibly.

That said, juggling credit lines can get out of hand, and it’s easy to fall behind with payments and face hefty interest charges. Here’s a guide to managing multiple credit cards: when to use certain cards, how to know if you have too many, and more.

Steps for Managing Multiple Credit Cards

Here’s how to manage your credit cards wisely and the steps to take to avoid unnecessary interest charges and fees.

Keep Track of Terms

Know what you are signing up for when you apply for a credit card. While a card may offer perks like sign-up bonuses, free vacations, and 0% interest rates initially, it may also charge high fees and exorbitant interest rates later on. Every credit card has different terms and conditions that are often buried in the small print.

Before applying for a new credit card, check the interest rate, or APR. Also look for penalty APRs, purchase APRs, and cash advance APRs. A penalty APR is charged if you don’t comply with the card’s terms and conditions. A purchase APR is the interest rate charged for purchases or carrying the balance over to the next month. A cash advance APR applies if you use your credit card to borrow cash.

A card may also offer an introductory 0% APR, for a limited period. However, once that period is over — or if you miss a payment — the interest rate can skyrocket. Many cards also charge an annual fee for card ownership, a maintenance fee, cash advance fees, foreign transaction fees, returned payment fees, and late payment fees.

If a card offers cash back, find out how much you need to spend to accumulate points or cash back. Check the fine print to find out what types of purchases are qualified and if there are any caps on earning cash and points. Also, read the rules on redeeming rewards, such as when they might expire or be forfeited.

For a sign-up bonus, you might be ineligible if you have owned the same card previously or another family member has the same card.


💡 Quick Tip: Check your credit report at least once a year to ensure there are no errors that can damage your credit score.

Pay on Time and in Full

You will likely incur fees if you miss payments due on your credit card. Also, if you make only the minimum payment on your credit card, you will increase your debt and pay unnecessary interest. But if you pay off your balance in full each month, you are in effect getting a free loan.

If you have multiple credit cards to juggle, it will take dedication to monitor the balances and due dates to avoid late payments, interest charges, and fees. However, managing credit cards responsibly can build your credit history.

Set Up Autopay

Once you understand the terms, conditions, and payment due dates of your various credit cards, set up automatic payments to avoid missing a payment. Missing a payment will mean that you are charged interest, and depending on the balance on the card, the interest payments can be steep.

Set Reminders

Managing multiple credit cards may require setting reminders. For example, if you signed up for a card with an initial period of 0%, you should know when that period ends. Also, keep track of when rewards expire, and when you should redeem points or rewards.

Recommended: What Is a FICO Score?

Simplify Your Payment Due Dates

You may want to change the payment due dates for your cards to make budgeting easier. For example, if the payments for multiple cards all fall on the same day or week, it can be difficult keeping enough cash on hand.

Consider scheduling due dates close to a payday or soon after a direct deposit. It might take one or two billing cycles for your request to take effect.

Know When to Use Each Card

There’s little point juggling multiple credit cards if you don’t use the right card for the right purpose. That’s why studying each card’s terms and conditions is crucial to optimizing the benefits of your cards. For example, some travel cards come with travel protections that will reimburse you if a trip has to be canceled, and co-branded airline cards may offer free checked bags or upgrades.

Keep a Record of Your Credit Card Features

Organization is the key to managing multiple credit cards. You can use a notebook, spreadsheet, or a personal finance app — whatever it takes for you to be able to access the information you need easily.

Some key data to have at your fingertips are the interest rate, credit limit, issue date, annual fees, and payment due dates, the balance from month to month, and the key facts about the rewards program (minimum spending limits, expiration dates, qualified items).

Give Each Card a Purpose

Allocating a purpose for each card will tell you what type of card you might want to get next. For example, you might have a card that offers travel rewards, another card for cash back on groceries, but you might want to also get a card that offers rewards for buying gas. Keep a record of which card serves what purpose.

Carry Only the Cards You Use

Don’t carry all your cards with you all the time. You risk losing them, plus it will make your wallet uncomfortable to carry! There’s no need to carry an airline card that you only use to book flights. Make sure you know which cards charge an inactivity fee, and set up reminders to use the card to avoid such penalties.

Recommended: Find Out Your Credit Score for Free

Use an App to Track Your Card Balances

It’s a good idea to use an app to track your card balances. Apps are particularly useful because they alert you when a payment is due or delinquent. Some apps perform free credit monitoring, help you find a credit card for a specific merchant, and track your loyalty programs.

Signs You Have Too Many Cards

How many cards is too many? That depends on how well you manage them. Here are some indicators that you should consider closing some accounts.

You Can’t Pay the Balance Off Each Month

If you can’t pay off all the balances on your cards each month, you are in danger of falling deeper into debt and having to pay interest. You also risk increasing your credit utilization ratio. When your ratio gets too high, credit card companies may turn you down and credit checks for future employment may be affected..

You’re Missing Payments

If you find it hard to keep track of your credit cards, miss payments, or lose rewards, it’s a sign you might have bitten off more than you can chew. Simplify your financial management by choosing three or four of the most advantageous cards for your lifestyle and cancel the rest.

You’re Earning Too Few Rewards

If you rarely redeem rewards, it might not be worth keeping the card. Not only are you paying a fee for a card that gives you little benefit, but you also have the hassle of keeping track of the card’s features and balance. It might be best to nix these credit cards.

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Which Cards Should You Stop Using?

When deciding which credit cards to stop using, list out the benefits of each card. Look at your spending history with that card over the past year and look at what you have gained. If you have spent little and gained little, it’s time to lose the card.

Similarly, if a card charges high annual fees and provides few benefits, don’t keep the card. Also look at the interest rate. If you have a balance on a high-interest card, pay off that debt and close down the card.

When Does It Make Sense to Close a Card?

It makes sense to close a card when you only use it to avoid an inactivity fee, if it provides few benefits, if the fees and interest rate are high, or if you are having trouble paying off the balance each month.


💡 Quick Tip: One way to raise your credit score? Pay your bills on time. Setting up autopay can help you keep your account in good standing.

The Takeaway

Having various cards can be advantageous because you can benefit from rewards and loyalty programs, build your credit history, and take advantage of interest-free credit if you pay off the balance each month. However, each credit card charges various fees, and managing multiple credit cards can be a headache.

When opening a new credit card, make sure the fees, rewards, limitations, and penalties that come with the card make sense for you. Also consider if you can manage the card and pay off the balance each month on time. Lastly, review your portfolio of cards regularly in case it makes sense to close down an account.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.


See exactly how your money comes and goes at a glance.

FAQ

How do I manage multiple credit cards?

Managing multiple credit cards comes down to organization. Keep track of all your cards and their various features, including due dates, what you should use them for, the rewards they offer, balances, interest rate, and penalties and fees. There are apps and online tools that help you to manage cards and monitor your credit score.

What is the 15/3 credit card rule?

The 15/3 credit card rule is a strategy to lower your credit utilization ratio. A credit utilization ratio of 30% or below makes you more attractive to lenders. Most people make one credit card payment a month by the due date, but with this strategy, a cardholder makes two payments each month, which reduces your credit utilization ratio significantly. Even if you regularly pay your credit card balance in full each and every month, you may still be carrying a large balance throughout the month, and your credit score may be affected.

How many credit cards is too many?

How many credit cards you should have depends on your lifestyle and how well you manage them. Feeling overwhelmed and making mistakes like not paying off balances on time are indicators that you cannot keep track of your cards. Other indicators that you may have too many credit cards are that you are not seeing much benefit in the way of rewards but are paying high fees, or you have a significant balance on a card with a high interest rate.


Photo credit: iStock/Sitthiphong

SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Skilled Trade Jobs in Demand for 2024

You don’t necessarily need a four-year degree to have a rewarding career that pays well. In fact, there are plenty of jobs out there that don’t require a bachelor’s degree and meet a wide variety of talents and interests, from nursing to mechanical technicians.

Here’s an explainer of what exactly is a “trade job,” plus a list of 25 of the highest-paying trade jobs as of 2022, which is the latest data available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What Is a Trade Job?

A trade job is a career that requires advanced training and skill that can be acquired outside a four-year bachelor’s degree. Instead, experience can be acquired through on-the-job instruction, apprenticeship, or vocational schooling.


💡 Quick Tip: Online tools make tracking your spending a breeze: You can easily set up budgets, then get instant updates on your progress, spot upcoming bills, analyze your spending habits, and more.

Highest-Paying Trade Jobs

If you’re interested in a job that doesn’t require a college degree, or you love working with your hands, consider this list of some of the highest-paying trade jobs in the U.S. The compilation shows average annual salary and was compiled from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

By the way, most if not all trade jobs require workers to be on site. Working remotely is not an option.

1. Power Plant Operator, Distributor, and Dispatcher – $97,570

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent, long-term on-the-job training

Duties: Control power plants and the flow of electricity from plants to substations, which then deliver power to homes and businesses.

Recommended: Should I Sell My House Now or Wait?

2. Real Estate Broker – $52,030

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent. Must complete some real estate courses to be eligible for licensure.

Duties: Help people buy and sell properties.

Recommended: Should I Sell My House Now or Wait?

3. Registered Nurse – $81,220

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree in Nursing, Associate degree in Nursing, or a diploma from an approved nursing program. Registered nurses must be licensed.

Duties: Help provide and coordinate patient care.

4. Dental Hygienist – $81,400

Requirements: Associate degree

Duties: Provide preventive dental care and examine patients for signs of oral diseases.

5. Water Transportation Worker – $66,100

Requirements: Will vary by job. For example, there are no requirements for entry-level sailors, while other workers might need to complete Coast Guard–approved training.

Duties: Operate and maintain vessels that carry cargo and people on the water.

6. Diagnostic Medical Sonographer – $78,210

Requirements: Associate degree

Duties: Operate special imaging equipment to create images of patients’ internal organs or to conduct tests.

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7. Farmer, Rancher, or Other Agricultural Manager – $75,760

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Run farms and other establishments that produce livestock, dairy products, or crops.

8. Gas Plant Operator – $79,460

Requirements: High school diploma

Duties: Help distribute or process gas for utility companies by controlling the compressors on main gas pipelines.

9. Pile Driver Operator – $70,220

Requirements: High school diploma and vocational training can be helpful.

Duties: Operate machines that drive pilings for retaining walls, bulkheads, and foundations of buildings, bridges, and piers.

10. First-Line Supervisor of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers – $77,650

Requirements: High school diploma and five years or more work experience

Duties: Directly supervise and coordinate the activities of construction or extraction workers, such as miners or those drilling for minerals.

11. First-Line Supervisor of Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers – $76,020

Requirements: High school diploma, some work experience

Duties: Directly supervise and coordinate mechanics, installers, and repairers. They may also advise customers seeking recommendations for services.

12. Legal Support Worker – $59,200

Requirements: Associate degree

Duties: Perform a variety of tasks to support attorneys such as interviewing clients, legal research, and case summaries.

13. Locomotive Engineer – $73,850

Requirements: High school diploma

Duties: Operate passenger and freight trains safely. May also coordinate train activities or control rail yard signals and switches.

14. Subway and Streetcar Operator – $75,880

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Operate subways or elevated suburban trains that don’t have a separate locomotive, or may operate an electric-powered streetcar. May handle fares.

15. Line Installer and Repairer – $82,340

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Install and repair lines for electrical power systems, telecommunications, and fiber optics.

16. Computer Network Support Specialist – $59,660

Requirements: Entry-level requirements may vary, but network support specialists usually need to have an associate degree. Applicants to these jobs may qualify with high school diploma and information technology certifications.

Duties: Provide technical support to computer users while also maintaining computer networks.

17. Claims Adjuster, Examiner, and Investigator – $72,040

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Evaluate insurance claims and act as an intermediary between claimants and the insurance company.

18. Electrical and Electronics Installer and Repairer for Transportation Equipment – $71,740

Requirements: Specialized training at a technical college

Duties: Install and maintain mobile electronics communication equipment on trains, watercraft, or other mobile equipment.

Recommended: The Highest Paying Jobs in Every State

19. Avionics Technician – $70,740

Requirements: Some may obtain a degree or certificate from a Federal Aviation Administration–approved aviation maintenance technician school, while other candidates may be trained on the job or in the military.

Duties: Repair and perform scheduled maintenance on aircraft.

20. Fire Inspector and Investigator – $65,800

Requirements: High school diploma, on-the-job training, and typically some experience as a firefighter

Duties: Fire inspectors help ensure buildings meet federal, state, and local fire codes and inspect buildings for potential fire hazards.

21. Transit and Railroad Police – $76,380

Requirements: Typically you must have a high school diploma or equivalent, complete a transit and railroad police training program, and receive a passing grade on a law enforcement exam from your state.

Duties: Help protect employees, passengers, and railroad and transit property.

22. Insurance Sales Agent – $57,860

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Work with clients and customers to explain and sell various types of insurance.

23. Media and Communication Equipment Worker – $74,490

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Install, repair, and maintain audio and visual systems across various industries, such as corporate offices and the film industry.

24. Boilermaker – $66,920

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Install, maintain, and repair boilers.

25. Construction and Building Inspector – $64,480

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties: Inspects buildings to ensure they are structurally sound and in compliance with specifications, building codes, and other regulations. May focus on a specific area such as plumbing or electrical systems.


💡 Quick Tip: When you have questions about what you can and can’t afford, a spending tracker app can show you the answer. With no guilt trip or hourly fee.

The Takeaway

On the high end, trade workers can make $90,000 or more at a career that doesn’t require a college education. That’s well above the $59,540 that represents the annual median income of U.S. full-time workers. And with a diverse range of career options to choose from, individuals who choose a trade job have a good chance at finding a fulfilling career that matches their interests and personality.

As your career takes off and you start earning a salary, you’ll likely want to begin budget planning and setting financial goals like paying down debt and saving for your future.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.


See exactly how your money comes and goes at a glance.


Photo credit: iStock/kali9

SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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30 Best High Paying Good Jobs For Extroverts That Pay Well in 2023

25 Best Jobs for Extroverts That Pay Well in 2024

The right career is one that capitalizes on an individual’s unique combination of skills, interests, and personality. Extroverts, for instance, tend to flourish in certain jobs and industries that introverts may not care for. And the worst jobs for extroverts are likely ones that attract introverts.

For all you extroverts out there, we’ve rounded up dozens of well-paying jobs that would be lucky to have you on board.

How to Know If You Are an Extrovert

Before we look at jobs for extroverts that pay well, it’s important to understand what an extrovert is. An extrovert is someone who draws their energy from the outside world. Extroverts often feel comfortable in group settings and social situations. They tend to make good leaders because they enjoy working with people.

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Common Characteristics of Extrovert Jobs

Good jobs for extroverts are ones that involve working with other people to solve problems. Because extroverts thrive on the energy they get from connecting with others, they tend to do well in jobs that require a lot of collaboration and human interaction.

On the other hand, good jobs for introverts allow them to focus intensely without interruptions from colleagues.

Do Extroverts Make More Money Than Introverts?

Being an extrovert can lead to a high-paying career. But extroverts don’t necessarily make more money than introverts. Education level, age, experience, and career choice can all greatly impact how much someone earns. Even your location factors in, as high-paying jobs vary by state.


💡 Quick Tip: When you have questions about what you can and can’t afford, a spending tracker app can show you the answer. With no guilt trip or hourly fee.

30 Best Jobs for Extroverts That Pay Well

What jobs are good for extroverts? Anyone looking to start a career or switch careers might consider one of these well-paying jobs for extrovert personalities. This list includes both jobs that don’t require college and those that do. Some even offer six-figure salaries.

Recommended: What Trade Makes the Most Money?

1. Insurance Sales Agent

Median Pay: $57,860 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 6%

Job Description: Work in an office or travel to meet clients. The role also has potential as a work-at-home job for retirees.

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties:

•   Build relationships with potential customers

•   Sell insurance policies

•   Answer product questions

2. Musician and Singer

Median Pay: $39.14 per hour

Job Growth Outlook: 1%

Job Description: Perform music in a studio or live setting for an audience. Professionals can make union wages or charge by the song or performance.

Requirements: No formal educational credential

Duties:

•   Play instruments live or in studio

•   Sing songs live

•   Record songs

3. Actor

Median Pay: $17.94 per hour

Job Growth Outlook: 3%

Job Description: Perform in a live setting or for film and television recordings. Professionals make union wages.

Requirements: Professional or on-the-job training

Duties:

•   Perform in live theater

•   Promote products in commercials

•   Act in movies and television shows

4. High School Teacher

Median Pay: $62,360 per year plus excellent benefits

Job Growth Outlook: 1%

Job Description: Teach academic lessons to high school students and prepare them for college or the job market.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Duties:

•   Prepare lesson plans

•   Teach students in a classroom

•   Grade papers

5. Human Resources Manager

Median Pay: $130,000 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 5%

Job Description: Plan and coordinate the administrative functions of a workplace.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Duties: Work in office environments to help recruit and retain talent, and achieve business goals.

•   Recruit and hire employees

•   Make decisions about competitive pay and benefits

•   Mediate workplace conflicts

Recommended: Is $100,000 a Good Salary?

6. Public Relations Specialist

Median Pay: $67,440 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 6%

Job Description: Develop and maintain the public image of the individuals and businesses they represent. Those with high-profile clients tend to earn the most.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Duties:

•   Write press releases

•   Create public image strategies

•   Provide damage control in crisis situations

7. Physician and Surgeon

Median Pay: $229,300 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 3%

Job Description: Diagnose and treat illnesses and injuries.

Requirements: Medical doctor degree

Duties:

•   Diagnose illnesses

•   Prescribe medications

•   Perform surgeries

Recommended: Is $100,000 a Good Salary?

8. Barber and Hairstylist

Median Pay: $33,400 per year plus tips

Job Growth Outlook: 8%

Job Description: Cut, color, and style client hair. Stylists at higher-end salons can make good money in salary and tips.

Requirements: Postsecondary nondegree award

Duties:

•   Cut and color hair

•   Style hair for special events

•   Provide other appearance services such as shaving

9. Bartender

Median Pay: $29,380 per year plus tips

Job Growth Outlook: 3%

Job Description: Mix and serve cocktails, wine, and beer to customers. Bartenders at higher-end establishments make most of their money in tips.

Requirements: No formal educational credential

Duties:

•   Mix and serve drinks

•   Offer beverage recommendations

•   Track inventory

10. Skincare Specialist

Median Pay: $38,060 per year plus tips

Job Growth Outlook: 9%

Job Description: Provide face and body treatments to clients in a spa or salon setting.

Requirements: State-approved cosmetology or esthetician license

Duties:

•   Assess clients’ skin needs

•   Offer skincare services like facials

•   Consult on skincare regimens

11. Dentist

Median Pay: $159,530 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 4%

Job Description: Diagnose and treat dental problems.

Requirements: Doctoral degree

Duties:

•   Treat patients’ gums, teeth, and mouth

•   Create treatment plans

•   Check for cavities and other dental issues

12. Registered Nurse

Median Pay: $81,220 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 6%

Job Description: Provide patient care.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree and professional licensing

Duties:

•   Provide care in hospitals, physicians’ offices, home healthcare settings, and nursing care facilities

•   Communicate with patients about their needs

•   Educate patients and the public about health conditions

13. Waiter

Median Pay: $29,120 per year plus tips

Job Growth Outlook: -3% (decline)

Job Description: Take customer orders and serve food and drinks. Waiters at higher-end restaurants and catering companies can make a decent salary and excellent tips.

Requirements: Relevant work experience

Duties:

•   Take orders from customers

•   Serve food and drinks

•   Keep a clean and organized work environment

Recommended: What Trade Makes the Most Money?

14. DJ

Median Pay: $20.46 per hour

Job Growth Outlook: -4% (decline)

Job Description: Act as an emcee for events such as weddings and award ceremonies. Popular DJs can earn hefty appearance fees for a few hours of work.

Requirements: Relevant work experience

Duties:

•   Play music

•   Create playlists

•   Host events

15. Political Scientist

Median Pay: $128,020 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 7%

Job Description: Study the origin, development, and operation of political systems and plan political strategies.

Requirements: Master’s degree

Duties:

•   Study political systems

•   Create reports and presentations

•   Consult on strategy

16. Advertising Sales Agent

Median Pay: $58,450 per year

Job Growth Outlook: -7% (decline)

Job Description: Sell advertising space to businesses. Many sales agents work on commission and can bring in high incomes.

Requirements: Relevant work experience

Duties:

•   Sell advertising space for radio, television, newspapers, and other media platforms

•   Meet sales quotas

•   Maintain client relationships

17. Real Estate Broker and Sale Agent

Median Pay: $52,030 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 3%

Job Description: Assist clients in the buying and selling of real estate. Successful agents can make big commissions on home sales.

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Duties:

•   Help clients find properties

•   Negotiate sales contracts

•   Host open houses

18. Interpreter and Translator

Median Pay: $53,640 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 4%

Job Description: Convert information from one language into another.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Duties:

•   Translate between languages for a variety of organizations

•   Speak simultaneous translations during meetings

•   Translate documents, such as books and business materials

19. Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Manager

Median Pay: $138,730 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 6%

Job Description: Plan advertising and marketing efforts to generate interest in a business’s products and services.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Duties:

•   Develop marketing campaigns

•   Create special promotions

•   Oversee the creation of advertisements

20. Flight Attendant

Median Pay: $63,760 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 11%

Job Description: Assist passengers and respond to safety issues and emergencies.

Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent and certification from the Federal Aviation Administration

Duties:

•   Navigate safety issues

•   Serve food and beverages

•   Assist with putting away luggage

21. Lawyer

Median Pay: $135,740 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 8%

Job Description: Advise and represent businesses, government agencies, and individuals on legal matters.

Requirements: Law degree and passing a state bar exam

Duties:

•   Advise clients

•   Represent clients in court

•   Review and draft contracts

22. Physical Therapist Assistant

Median Pay: $57,240 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 19%

Job Description: Help patients regain movement and manage pain after an illness or injury

Requirements: On-the-job training

Duties:

•   Set up equipment

•   Care for patients

•   Work with physical therapists to help patients make progress

23. Marriage and Family Therapist

Median Pay: $56,570 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 15%

Job Description: Work with couples and families to resolve relationship challenges.

Requirements: Master’s degree

Duties:

•   Provide counseling to patients

•   Help mediate conflict

•   Offer mental health support

24. Interior Designer

Median Pay: $61,590 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 4%

Job Description: Work with individuals or businesses to plan, source, and arrange decor.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Duties:

•   Make indoor spaces functional and aesthetically pleasing

•   Consult with clients

•   Choose essential and decorative objects

25. Career Counselor

Median Pay: $60,140 per year

Job Growth Outlook: 5%

Job Description: Help clients choose a career path.

Requirements: Master’s degree and licensure for career counselors and advisors in some states

Duties:

•   Guide clients toward appropriate career paths

•   Interview prep

•   Review resumes and cover letters



💡 Quick Tip: Income, expenses, and life circumstances can change. Consider reviewing your budget a few times a year and making any adjustments if needed.

The Takeaway

There are many jobs for extroverts that pay well, from business roles to creative performers. Many jobs don’t offer traditional salary or hourly wages; instead, a large portion of income is made through commission or tips. Some of the jobs we list require college degrees or professional certifications, but many only require a high school diploma or on-the-job training.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.

With SoFi, you can keep tabs on how your money comes and goes.

FAQ

What jobs are good for an extrovert?

Many jobs that are a good fit for extroverts are those that involve working with clients or patients in a collaborative setting, such as doctor, lawyer, or hairstylist.

What is the most fun, high-paying job?

A lot of fun, rewarding jobs pay well. For example, a bartender at a high-end restaurant can earn hundreds of dollars a night in tips.

What odd job makes the most money?

A job many people may not expect to make a lot of money is political scientist. This career path can lead to a median annual salary of $128,020.


Photo credit: iStock/Harbucks

SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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How Much Does a Speech Pathologist Make a Year?

The median annual wage for speech pathologists in the U.S. is $84,140, according to the latest data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). But salaries can vary significantly, ranging from less than $56,370 to more than $126,680.

How much money you can make as a speech-language pathologist may depend on several factors, including the industry in which you work, the level of education you attain, and where you live.

Here’s a look at what speech pathologists do and how they are paid.

What Is a Speech Pathologist?

Speech pathologists are health care providers who evaluate, diagnose, and treat children and adults who are experiencing communication difficulties because of speech, language, or voice problems. They also may treat clients who are struggling with developmental delays, memory issues, or who have trouble swallowing.

Speech pathologists typically work in a school, hospital, or rehabilitation/nursing home setting, or they may open their own practice. They often work as part of a multi-disciplinary team that also provides occupational therapy, physical therapy, and other types of care.

All speech pathologists must be licensed. While the qualifications can vary by state, a master’s degree from an accredited university is often required, along with several hours of supervised clinical experience, a Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology (CCC-SLP) from the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA), and a passing grade on a state exam.

Depending on the work you plan to do, other certifications may be required by your employer, including a teaching certificate if you practice in an educational setting.


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How Much Do Starting Speech Pathologists Make a Year?

Speech-language pathologists with one to three years of experience earned a median salary of $74,000 in 2023, according to the ASHA’s SLP Health Care Survey Salary Report. The job site ZipRecruiter lists Massachusetts, Washington, Colorado, Delaware, and Illinois as the states where speech pathologists currently earn the highest entry-level salaries.

Recommended: High-Paying Vocational Jobs for 2024

What Is the Average Salary for a Speech Pathologist?

So how much can you expect to make per year if you stay with a career as a speech pathologist?

The 2023 SLP Health Care Survey Salary Report found that several factors can have an impact on speech pathologists’ earnings, including job duties, the type of facility where they’re employed, if they work full- or part-time, if they’re paid a salary vs. hourly wage or on a per-visit basis, and whether they work in a region with a higher cost of living.

Here are the average annual salaries for speech pathologists by state.

Average Speech Pathologist Salary by State

State Average Annual Salary
Alabama $81,140
Alaska $90,279
Arizona $83,423
Arkansas $68,644
California $94,592
Colorado $87,186
Connecticut $80,836
Delaware $82,742
Florida $66,895
Georgia $75,588
Hawaii $87,406
Idaho $90,774
Illinois $80,442
Indiana $85,185
Iowa $80,542
Kansas $75,362
Kentucky $72,228
Louisiana $73,799
Maine $91,996
Maryland $80,211
Massachusetts $90,970
Michigan $72,246
Minnesota $84,527
Mississippi $80,048
Missouri $77,637
Montana $82,167
Nebraska $78,728
Nevada $85,362
New Hampshire $88,375
New Jersey $89,146
New Mexico $84,483
New York $98,990
North Carolina $75,258
North Dakota $89,084
Ohio $82,280
Oklahoma $76,241
Oregon $89,146
Pennsylvania $90,666
Rhode Island $82,571
South Carolina $76,844
South Dakota $84,193
Tennessee $78,555
Texas $90,424
Utah $78,424
Vermont $97,120
Virginia $81,864
Washington $110,930
West Virginia $70,022
Wisconsin $87,933
Wyoming $86,602

Source: ZipRecruiter

Recommended: Cost of Living by State

Speech Pathologists Job Considerations for Pay and Benefits

If you decide speech pathology is the right fit for you, you may not need to worry about job security. The BLS is projecting that employment of speech pathologists will grow by 19% over the next decade, which is much faster than the average for all occupations combined.

Therapists are needed more than ever to assist aging baby boomers and others who’ve experienced a stroke, hearing loss, dementia, or other health-related issues. And there is an increasing need for those who wish to work with kids and adults on the autism spectrum. Therapists are also needed to help children overcome speech impediments and other communication issues.

A career as a speech pathologist also can offer a competitive paycheck. While the BLS reported the median weekly earnings for all full-time workers was $1,145 in the fourth quarter of 2023, the average weekly paycheck for a speech pathologist was $1,652, according to ZipRecruiter.

Of course, the pay and benefits you receive will likely be tied to the job you choose. If you’re employed by a public school district in a rural community, for example, you may not earn as much as a department head at a large health facility in a major city. Still, you can expect to receive benefits similar to other workers in the health-care field, including health insurance, a retirement plan, vacation pay, etc.

As you weigh your career decisions, consider using online tools to ensure you’re staying on track with your personal and financial goals. A money tracker app, for example, can help you create a budget and keep an eye on your spending and your credit score.

Pros and Cons of a Speech Pathologist’s Salary

Probably the biggest downside of choosing a career as a speech pathologist is the amount of time and money it can take just to get started. After getting your bachelor’s degree, it may take two or more years to complete your master’s degree and clinical training. Depending on the career path you choose, you also may need to earn certain certifications along with your state license to practice. And it may take some time to pay off your student debt.

On the plus side, you’ll be helping others in a career that can be extremely fulfilling, and you can earn a comfortable living while doing so.

Here are some more pros and cons to keep in mind.

Pros:

•   As a speech pathologist, you will be helping others and, in many cases, changing lives.

•   You’ll be working and networking with other professionals who will help you keep learning.

•   You may be able to design a schedule that fits your needs (especially if you have your own practice).

Cons:

•   You may have an overwhelming caseload, and the work could be frustrating and stressful at times.

•   You may have to work nights and weekends (even with a job in education or in private practice).

•   The paperwork can be daunting and may require working overtime or taking work home to keep up.


💡 Quick Tip: Income, expenses, and life circumstances can change. Consider reviewing your budget a few times a year and making any adjustments if needed.

The Takeaway

Working as a speech pathologist can be professionally rewarding. Not only is the field growing, it tends to pay well, too. However, you can expect to make a substantial investment in time and money before you get the job you want. And how much you earn — especially when starting out — can depend on several factors, including the specialty you choose, who your employer is, and where you’re located.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.

SoFi helps you stay on top of your finances.

FAQ

Can you make $100,000 a year as a speech pathologist?

Yes. While the median annual wage for speech-language pathologists in the U.S. is $84,140, the highest 10% of earners in this category make six-figure salaries.

Do most speech pathologists enjoy their work?

Speech-language pathologists came in at No. 3 on U.S. News & World Report’s ranking of “Best HealthCare Jobs” for 2024 and No. 10 on the news site’s list of “100 Best Jobs.” While the career was rated above average for stress, it received high ratings for both flexibility and opportunities for upward mobility.

Is it hard to get hired as a speech pathologist?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job outlook for speech pathologists is good, and should be solid for the next decade. If you get the proper education and training, and you have a passion for helping others, it shouldn’t be too difficult to find work in this profession.


Photo credit: iStock/akinbostanci

SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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How Much Does a Psychologist Make a Year?

The median annual wage for psychologists in the U.S. is $85,330, according to the latest data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). But salaries can vary significantly, ranging from less than $50,000 to more than $140,000.

How much money you can make as a psychologist may depend on several factors, including the industry you choose to work in, the level of education you attain, and where your job is located. Here’s a look at what psychologists do and how they are paid.

What Are Psychologists?

Psychologists are mental health professionals who are trained to help individuals and groups understand and address various behavioral, emotional, and organizational challenges. There are several different types of psychologists, including:

•   Clinical and counseling psychologists, who evaluate, diagnose, and treat mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders such as depression, anxiety, grief, anger, and addiction.

•   Industrial/organizational psychologists, who help organizations solve workplace issues and improve work-life balance.

•   School psychologists, who specialize in dealing with problems that can affect students’ behaviors and learning.

•   Neuropsychologists, who study how damage to a person’s brain or body can impact behavior and cognition.

•   Forensic psychologists, who may collaborate with various law enforcement agencies, attorneys, judges, and others on certain aspects of a legal case.

It’s important to note that a psychologist is not the same thing as a psychiatrist, though they are often confused. A psychiatrist is a medical doctor who can prescribe medications. A psychologist typically holds a doctoral degree in psychology, which is a social science.


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What Does It Take to Become a Psychologist?

Do you have good observational skills? Are you a problem solver? Do you pride yourself on your ability to build a rapport with others? Do you have empathy for those who are experiencing emotional or behavioral issues?

If so, you may find you’re well-suited for a career as a psychologist. But you’ll also have to get the education and training necessary for the job.

Psychologists usually must have at least a master’s degree to get into the field, and depending on what type of work you hope to do, you may need a doctoral degree as well. Clinical and counseling psychologists, for example, typically need a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in psychology or a Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) degree.

Industrial-organizational psychologists usually earn at least a master’s degree, with coursework that focuses on understanding how people behave in the workplace. School psychologists also may need at least a master’s degree with a focus on student development and other educational issues. And most degree programs can also require an internship and clinical experience.

Most states also require psychologists to obtain a license. And there are several certifications available that specific employers may require.

Recommended: High-Paying Vocational Jobs for 2024

How Much Do Starting Psychologists Make a Year?

The average salary for a starting psychologist in 2024 is $89,326, according to the job site Salary.com, but entry-level salaries currently can range from $75,493 to $101,117.

Of course, the work you do, your education level, certifications, and even your work location can impact how much you might earn as a beginning psychologist. The job site ZipRecruiter lists Washington, New York, Vermont, California, and Maine as the states where starting clinical psychologists currently earn the most money.

What Is the Average Salary for a Psychologist?

So, how much can you make per year if you choose a career as a psychologist?

You can expect your specialty to have a big influence on how much you earn. According to BLS statistics, industrial-organizational psychologists currently earn the highest salaries, while school psychologists earn the least.

Staying up to date by continuing your education and training may help boost your salary as well. And building a reputation through research and publishing can also make a psychologist more valuable to employers and clients.

If you’re hoping to negotiate for a more competitive paycheck, it’s important to remember that salaries — or how much a psychologist makes an hour — may be affected by the cost of living or demand in a particular region.
Here’s how psychologists’ average annual salaries break down by state based on ZipRecruiter data.

Average Psychologist Salary by State

State Average Annual Salary
Alabama $129,310
Alaska $176,920
Arizona $132,948
Arkansas $130,467
California $145,770
Colorado $165,086
Connecticut $132,272
Delaware $155,187
Florida $106,610
Georgia $120,463
Hawaii $173,156
Idaho $139,446
Illinois $152,897
Indiana $135,754
Iowa $131,180
Kansas $123,671
Kentucky $138,059
Louisiana $119,804
Maine $142,367
Maryland $150,294
Massachusetts $174,781
Michigan $136,667
Minnesota $137,219
Mississippi $131,343
Missouri $146,175
Montana $130,944
Nebraska $147,086
Nevada $167,279
New Hampshire $139,791
New Jersey $143,454
New Mexico $136,445
New York $156,917
North Carolina $141,923
North Dakota $176,893
Ohio $133,380
Oklahoma $142,442
Oregon $177,795
Pennsylvania $143,748
Rhode Island $164,679
South Carolina $144,913
South Dakota $167,182
Tennessee $127,338
Texas $138,507
Utah $127,431
Vermont $153,232
Virginia $152,942
Washington $169,179
West Virginia $111,019
Wisconsin $142,067
Wyoming $137,573

Source: ZipRecruiter

Recommended: Cost of Living by State

Psychologist Job Considerations for Pay and Benefits

Besides a pretty good paycheck, another plus to becoming a psychologist is that you may not have to worry about job security. The BLS is projecting overall employment of psychologists will grow by 6% over the next decade, which is faster than the average for all occupations combined. And job growth for those who specialize in clinical and counseling psychology is projected to grow by 11%.

Of course, the pay and perks you’ll receive as a psychologist will likely be tied to the specialty you choose and the salary negotiation tactics you use. Whether you’re a school psychologist or work for a major corporation, you can expect to be offered benefits such as health insurance, a retirement plan, paid time off, and opportunities for continuing education.

Depending on the type of work you do, you may also be able to participate in profit-sharing, receive regular bonuses, work a flexible schedule, or earn income from consulting or writing books.


💡 Quick Tip: Income, expenses, and life circumstances can change. Consider reviewing your budget a few times a year and making any adjustments if needed.

Pros and Cons of a Psychologist’s Salary

Probably the biggest downside of choosing a career as a psychologist is the amount of time and money it can take just to get started. After getting your bachelor’s degree, it may take two or more years to complete your master’s degree, and then another four to seven years to earn your doctorate degree. Add on even more time for training — and to study for your license — and it could be several years before you can pursue the job you want. And by that time, you may have some substantial student debt to pay down.

On the plus side, you’ll be in a career that can be both personally and financially rewarding.

Here are some more pros and cons to consider:

Pros

•   You’ll be helping people. As a psychologist, you can have a meaningful impact on others, whether you’re working with children or adults.

•   The demand (and respect) for psychological services is increasing, as mental health is now considered an important part of our overall well-being.

•   Whether you’re drawn to research, counseling, or clinical practice, a career in psychology can offer a wide array of job options. You may even be able to design a job and flexible schedule that suits your needs.

•   You may benefit personally from skills like empathy, critical thinking, and creative problem-solving that you gain as a psychologist.

Cons

•   Trying to help people who have behavioral and emotional issues can be stressful. It may be difficult to leave work at work.

•   You may run into ethical dilemmas that make dealing with a client and/or employer a challenge.

•   If you decide to open your own practice, you’ll have to deal with the business side of things as well as the work you’re doing with clients.

•   Depending on the type of work you do, your job may be dangerous at times. You may have to counsel a person with anger issues, for example, or someone who has committed a violent crime, which could put you at risk.

As you consider this important career decision, keep in mind that online tools that can help you succeed. A money tracker app, for example, can help you create a budget, keep an eye on your spending, and monitor your credit score as you work toward your personal and financial goals.

The Takeaway

Working as a psychologist can be a fulfilling career, and finding and keeping a job in this growing field shouldn’t be too difficult. But you can expect to make a substantial investment in time and money before you finally get the job you want. And how much money you make as a psychologist can depend on several factors, especially when you’re starting out. The specialty you choose, who your employer is, and where your job is located can all affect your earning potential.

Take control of your finances with SoFi. With our financial insights and credit score monitoring tools, you can view all of your accounts in one convenient dashboard. From there, you can see your various balances, spending breakdowns, and credit score. Plus you can easily set up budgets and discover valuable financial insights — all at no cost.

SoFi helps you stay on top of your finances.

FAQ

Can you make $100,000 a year as a psychologist?

Yes. According to the latest ZipRecruiter data, psychologists in every state make an average annual salary that’s more than $100,000.

Do people like being a psychologist?

Psychologists who responded to the website CareerExplorer’s ongoing survey on job satisfaction rated their career happiness a 3.5 out of 5 stars. And U.S. News & World Report, which ranks jobs based on salary, upward mobility, work-life balance, among other factors — gave “psychologist” the No. 5 spot on its list of “Best Science Jobs.”

Is it hard to get hired as a psychologist?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, job growth for psychologists is expected to be strong through the next decade. If you get the proper education and training, and have a passion for helping others, it shouldn’t be too hard to find work in this profession.


Photo credit: iStock/Dean Mitchell

SoFi Relay offers users the ability to connect both SoFi accounts and external accounts using Plaid, Inc.’s service. When you use the service to connect an account, you authorize SoFi to obtain account information from any external accounts as set forth in SoFi’s Terms of Use. Based on your consent SoFi will also automatically provide some financial data received from the credit bureau for your visibility, without the need of you connecting additional accounts. SoFi assumes no responsibility for the timeliness, accuracy, deletion, non-delivery or failure to store any user data, loss of user data, communications, or personalization settings. You shall confirm the accuracy of Plaid data through sources independent of SoFi. The credit score is a VantageScore® based on TransUnion® (the “Processing Agent”) data.

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Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Non affiliation: SoFi isn’t affiliated with any of the companies highlighted in this article.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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