Guide to Forex Margin: Requirements, Terms, and Examples

What Is Margin in Forex Trading?

Forex margin trading is when foreign exchange traders borrow money from their brokers in order to make bigger trades than they would otherwise be able to based on their capital position. Like all margin trading, the risks of forex margin trading are higher, but the practice can also produce higher profits.

Traders who engage in forex margin trading are using leverage as part of their investing strategy.

What Is Forex Margin?

Forex margin is similar to the margin trading used in futures markets. Traders deposit money into a margin account as a good faith deposit, which allows them to open, hold and trade forex using leverage (with their account balance as collateral). This lets the traders control traders worth much more than they would otherwise.

Forex (also known as foreign exchange or FX) is a global trading market in which investors trade national currencies. Forex trading is the largest and most liquid market in the world. Currencies trade in what are called “pairs.” For example, the Euro (EUR) versus the United States dollar (USD) appears as the EUR/USD currency pair with the Euro being the base currency and the USD being the term currency.

Traders use the FX market to hedge against foreign currency and interest rate risk. Geopolitical risks are also managed while speculators take part alongside hedgers. The forex market is both a spot (cash) market and a derivatives market. Forwards, futures, currency swaps, and options trade in the FX market.

How Does Forex Margin Work?

Forex margin works by allowing a trader to hold large positions with a relatively small amount of collateral. When you trade with leverage, you amplify risk and return.

While there is no standard amount of margin in the forex market, it is common for traders to post 1% margin, which allows them to trade $100,000 of notional currency for every $1,000 posted.

For example, let’s say you want to trade forex on margin to speculate on the price of the EUR relative to the USD. You must open an FX trading account with a firm that offers this type of trading. Before trading, you must make a deposit into your margin account.

Let’s assume the broker requires 1% margin to trade EUR/USD. You seek to control $50,000 worth of that currency pair, so you post a deposit of $500. After opening the account and posting margin, you execute a buy order on the EUR/USD pair for $50,000 of notional currency at $1.20 per Euro.

If EUR/USD moves from $1.20 to $1.212, that 1% advance moves your position value from $50,000 to $50,500. Your unrealized profit is $500, or 100% of your initial deposit. If EUR/USD declines 1%, you have an unrealized loss of $500. You could face a margin call or a forced liquidation if prices move against you enough.


💡 Quick Tip: One of the advantages of using a margin account, if you qualify, is that a margin loan gives you the ability to buy more securities. Be sure to understand the terms of the margin account, though, as buying on margin includes the risk of bigger losses.

Forex Margin Requirements

Forex margin requirements vary by broker. Variables such as liquidity and volatility impact the amount of margin you need to trade FX. The less liquid the trading environment and the more volatile the currency pair, the higher your margin requirement will generally be. The broker wants you to be able to trade freely but must balance the credit (or default) risk of its customers. Trading with small margin amounts means you have high leverage.

Typical margin requirements range from 50% on the high end to 0.5% on the low end. Those figures correspond to 2:1 leverage and 200:1 leverage, respectively. Knowing your leverage ratio helps you grasp your account’s risk. Brokers determine forex margin requirements based on your credit profile and how much default risk they want to take on.

Forex Margin Terms

You’ll need to understand forex margin terms to navigate this volatile trading arena:

•   Equity: Your account balance after adding current profits and subtracting current losses from your cash

•   Margin Requirement: Your required deposit to trade with leverage

•   Used margin: Margin set aside to keep existing trades active

•   Free margin: Available margin to open new positions

•   Margin level in forex: A measure of how well funded your account is. Divide your equity by used margin, then multiply that by 100 to find your margin level in forex.

•   Leverage: The use of borrowed capital to enhance returns

•   Pip: A measurement representing the smallest unit of value in a currency quote. Pip stands for “percentage in point.”

•   Spread: The difference between the bid and ask prices

What Is Margin Level in Forex?

Your margin level in forex is the ratio between equity and used margin. It is a straightforward calculation expressed as a percentage. It is your account’s equity percentage multiplied by 100. If you’re trading a currency pair other than the currency in your account, you may have to also do a currency conversion to determine your forex margin in that denomination.

Margin Level = (Equity / Used Margin) x 100%

For example, if you have $5,000 of equity with $1,000 of margin, then your margin level is 500%. The lower the margin level in forex, the less free margin you have available to trade. If your margin level dips low enough, your broker might issue a margin call or an automatic stop out on your position.

While margin level minimums vary depending on the brokerage firm used, many brokers set a minimum margin level at 100%. That means if your equity is equal to or less than your margin used, you will not be able to open new trades.

Forex Margin Example

Let’s say you wish to go long the USD/JPY currency pair. Assume your account balance is $2,000 and you trade a notional value of $10,000. Also assume the margin requirement on this pair is 5%. Your required margin is the notional value multiplied by the margin requirement.

$500 = $10,000 x .05

Now compare the required margin (which is also your used margin) of $500 to your $2,000 of equity.

Your margin level is $2,000 / $500

400% = ($2,000 / $500) x 100%

Your margin level, 400%, is safely above the 100% minimum margin level in forex to avoid margin calls and automatic liquidation from your broker. You can also open new trades so long as your margin level remains above the 100% minimum.

Pros and Cons of Trading Forex on Margin

There are both benefits and drawbacks to using margin when trading currencies. Here’s a look at some of them.

Pros

Pros of using margin to trade forex include that it can enhance return potential, more buying power means access to many trading opportunities and currency pairs, and that the forex markets are open 24 hours a day, five and a half days a week. Depending on how you like to trade, that can be an attractive feature.

Cons

Some of the downsides of trading forex on margin are that trading with high leverage can quickly lead to big losses and margin calls, trading forex on margin creates more volatility, which can increase stress, and that forex markets are less regulated than some other markets. In short: there’s more risk to take into consideration.


💡 Quick Tip: How to manage potential risk factors in a self-directed investment account? Doing your research and employing strategies like dollar-cost averaging and diversification may help mitigate financial risk when trading stocks.

Is There a Difference Between Leverage and Margin in Forex?

Leverage and margin are similar concepts, but they’re different. One way to think of the differences is that a trader can use margin to increase their leverage. Margin is the tool, and leverage is the force behind the tool, which can be used to potentially increase returns (or losses).

The Takeaway

Currency trading is a liquid market that is open more hours per week than regular stock markets. Forex trading involves posting a margin deposit that allows traders to have exposure to large notional values of a currency. There are advantages and disadvantages to know as well as risks to consider.

If you do have the experience and the risk tolerance to try out trading on margin, you could increase your buying power, take advantage of more investment opportunities, and potentially increase your returns. But don’t forget the risks involved.

Ready to invest in your goals? It’s easy to get started when you open an investment account with SoFi Invest. You can invest in stocks, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), mutual funds, alternative funds, and more. SoFi doesn’t charge commissions, but other fees apply (full fee disclosure here).

For a limited time, opening and funding an Active Invest account gives you the opportunity to get up to $1,000 in the stock of your choice.

FAQ

How much margin should you use for Forex trading?

It depends on your comfort level and risk tolerance. If you seek maximum risk, then you might be comfortable with a low margin amount. Those with a lower risk tolerance might prefer to trade with a higher margin deposit. You can typically have a leverage ratio anywhere from 1:1 to 500:1.

What is a bad margin level in Forex trading?

You want to have a forex trading margin level above 100%. A margin percentage any lower means you might not be able to open new trades.

Can you trade Forex without leverage?

Yes, you can trade forex without leverage by only trading with your margin deposit.

What is free margin in forex trading?

Free margin is the amount of money available to open new forex positions. It is your account’s equity after subtracting the margin used.

What is a good margin level in forex?

Generally, a good margin level in forex would be above 100%, but depending on how experienced of a trader you are, it can be much higher.

What does 5% margin mean in forex?

The margin percentage refers to how much cash a trader needs to put down to open a trade. So, if the requirement is 5% margin, a trader must put down 5% of the overall trade amount to open a position.


Photo credit: iStock/eggeeggjiew

SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

*Borrow at 10%. Utilizing a margin loan is generally considered more appropriate for experienced investors as there are additional costs and risks associated. It is possible to lose more than your initial investment when using margin. Please see SoFi.com/wealth/assets/documents/brokerage-margin-disclosure-statement.pdf for detailed disclosure information.
Claw Promotion: Customer must fund their Active Invest account with at least $10 within 30 days of opening the account. Probability of customer receiving $1,000 is 0.028%. See full terms and conditions.

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Back to Basics: What Is a 401k

A Beginner’s Guide to 401(k) Retirement Plans

Saving for retirement is one of the most important steps you can take to help secure your financial future. Your employer might offer a 401(k) retirement plan — and possibly matching contributions as well. However, if you’ve never signed up for a 401(k), you might be wondering whether you can afford to take a chunk of money out of your paycheck each pay period, especially if you’re just starting out in your career.

What is a 401(k) exactly and how does it work? Read on to learn about this retirement plan, including how to open and contribute to a 401(k) account, plus how it can help you save for retirement.

What Is a 401(k)?

A 401(k) is a retirement savings plan offered by an employer. You sign up for the plan at work, and your contributions to the 401(k), which may be a percentage of your pay or a predetermined amount, are automatically deducted from your paychecks.

You decide how to invest your 401(k) money by choosing from a number of available options, such as stocks, bonds, and mutual funds.

Employers may match what individual employees contribute to a 401(k) up to a certain amount, depending on the employer and the plan.


💡 Quick Tip: Before opening any investment account, consider what level of risk you are comfortable with. If you’re not sure, start with more conservative investments, and then adjust your portfolio as you learn more.

How Does a 401(k) Work?

The purpose of a 401(k) is to help individuals save for retirement. Once you sign up for the plan, your contributions are automatically deducted from your paychecks at an amount or percentage of your salary selected by you.

There are two main types of 401(k) plans. Your employer may offer both types or just one. The main difference between them has to do with the way the plans are taxed.

Traditional 401(k)

With a traditional 401(k), contributions are taken from your pay before taxes have been deducted. This means your taxable income is lowered for the year and you’ll pay less income tax. However, you’ll pay taxes on your contributions and earnings when you withdraw money from the plan in retirement.

Roth 401(k)

With a Roth 401(k), contributions to the plan are taken after taxes are deducted from your pay. Because your contributions are made with after-tax dollars, you don’t get an upfront tax deduction. The money in your Roth 401(k) grows tax-free and you don’t owe any taxes on the withdrawals you make in retirement — as long as you’ve had the account for at least five years.

Traditional 401(k) vs Roth 401(k)

Here’s a quick comparison of a traditional 401(k) and a Roth 401(k).

Traditional 401(k)

Roth 401(k)

Taxes on contributions Contributions are made with pre-tax dollars, which reduces taxable income for the year. Contributions are made with after-tax dollars. There is no upfront tax deduction.
Taxes on withdrawals Money withdrawn in retirement is taxed as ordinary income. Money is withdrawn tax-free in retirement as long as the account is at least five years old.
Rules for withdrawals Withdrawals taken in retirement are taxed. Withdrawals taken before age 59 ½ may also be subject to a 10% penalty. Withdrawals in retirement are not taxed. However, withdrawals taken before age 59 ½ or if the account is less than five years old may be subject to a penalty and taxes.

401(k) Contribution Limits

The amount an employee and an employer can contribute annually to a 401(k) is adjusted periodically for inflation. For 2024, the employee 401(k) contribution limit is $23,000. If you’re 50 or older, you can contribute an additional $7,500 as part of a catch-up contribution.

The overall limits on yearly contributions from both employer and employee combined for 2024 are $69,000. The limit is $76,500, including catch-up contributions, for those 50 and up.

How Does Employer Matching Work?

If your employer offers matching contributions, they will likely use a specific formula to determine the match. The match may be a set dollar amount or it can be based on a percentage of an employee’s contribution up to a certain portion of their total salary. For instance, some employers contribute $0.50 for every $1 an employee contributes up to 6% of their salary.

Employees typically need to contribute a certain minimum amount to their 401(k) in order to get the employer match.

Get a 2% IRA match. Tax season is now match season.

Get a 2% match on all your SoFi IRA contributions* through Tax Day (up to the annual contribution limits). Plus, funding your IRA may reduce taxes.


*Offer lasts through Tax Day, 4/15/24. Only offers made via ACH are eligible for the match. ACATs, wires, and rollovers are not included.

401(k) Withdrawal Rules

The rules for withdrawals from traditional and Roth 401(k)s stipulate that an individual must be at least 59 ½ to make qualified withdrawals and avoid paying a penalty. In addition, a Roth 401(k) must have been open for at least five years in order to avoid a penalty.

When you take qualified withdrawals from your 401(k) in retirement, you’ll be taxed or not depending on the type of 401(k) plan you have. With a traditional 401(k), you’ll pay taxes at your ordinary income tax rate on your contributions and earnings that accrued over time.

If you have a Roth 401(k), however, the qualified withdrawals you take in retirement will not be taxed as long as the account has been open for at least five years.

When you make withdrawals, you can do so either in lump-sum payments or in installments, or possibly as an annuity, depending on your company’s plan.



💡 Quick Tip: The advantage of opening a Roth IRA and a tax-deferred account like a 401(k) or traditional IRA is that by the time you retire, you’ll have tax-free income from your Roth, and taxable income from the tax-deferred account. This can help with tax planning.

401(k) Early Withdrawal Rules

Withdrawals taken before an individual reaches age 59 ½ or if their Roth IRA has been open for less than five years, are subject to a 10% penalty as well as any taxes they may owe with a traditional IRA. However, an early withdrawal may be exempt from the penalty in certain circumstances, including:

•   To buy or build a first home

•   To pay for certain higher education expenses

•   The account holder becomes disabled

•   The account holder passes away and a beneficiary inherits the assets in their account

•   To pay for certain medical expenses

Some 401(k) plans also allow for hardship withdrawals, but there are rules and expenses involved with doing so.

Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs)

If you have a traditional 401(K), you’ll be required to start taking money out of your account at age 73. This is known as a required minimum distribution (RMD) and you’ll need to take RMDs annually. Otherwise, you can face fees and penalties.

The amount of your RMD is calculated based on your life expectancy.

Pros and Cons of 401(k)s

A 401(k) plan comes with benefits for employees, but there are some downsides as well. Here are some of the advantages and disadvantages of a 401(k).

Pros

•   Contributions you make to a traditional 401(k) plan may reduce your taxable income, and that money will not be taxed until it’s distributed at retirement.

•   Contributions you make to a Roth 401(k) may be withdrawn tax-free in retirement.

•   Because you can set up automatic deductions from your paycheck, you are more likely to save that money instead of using it for immediate needs.

•   Your employer may match your contributions up to a certain amount or percentage.

•   The money is yours. If you change jobs or cannot continue to work, you have the ability to roll over your 401(k) into either your next employer’s 401(k) plan or another retirement account like an IRA.

Cons

•   Investment choices in a 401(k) may be limited. Your employer picks the investments you can choose from, and typically the selection is fairly small.

•   You typically can’t make qualified withdrawals from a 401(k) before age 59 ½ without being subject to a penalty and taxes.

•   You need to take RMDs from a 401(k)starting at age 73. Otherwise you may owe taxes and penalties.

The Takeaway

A 40I(k) plan is an employer-sponsored retirement savings plan that allows employees to contribute money directly from their paychecks. Plus, in many cases employers will match employee contributions up to a certain amount — meaning your retirement savings will grow faster than if you contributed on your own.

If you max out your 401(k) contributions, another option you might consider to help save for retirement is to open an IRA. Not only is it possible to have both a 401(k) and an IRA at the same time, but having more than one retirement plan may help you save even more money for your golden years.

Ready to invest in your goals? It’s easy to get started when you open an investment account with SoFi Invest. You can invest in stocks, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), mutual funds, alternative funds, and more. SoFi doesn’t charge commissions, but other fees apply (full fee disclosure here).


Invest with as little as $5 with a SoFi Active Investing account.

FAQ

Are 401(k)s Still Worth It?

It depends on your retirement goals, but a 401(k) can be worth it if it helps you save money for retirement. Contributions to the plan are automatic, which can make it easier to save. Also, your employer may contribute matching funds to your 401(k), and there may be potential tax benefits, depending on the type of 401(k) you have.

What happens to your 401(k) when you leave your job?

If you leave your job, you can roll over your 401(k) into your new employer’s 401(k) plan or another retirement account like an IRA. You can also typically leave your 401(k) with your former employer, but in that case, you can no longer contribute to it.

What happens to your 401(k) when you retire?

When you retire, you can start to withdraw money from your 401(k) without penalty as long as you are at least 59 ½. You will need to take annual required minimum distributions from the plan starting at age 73.


Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

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Can You Have Multiple IRAs?

Can You Have Multiple IRAs?

In theory, there’s no limit to how many individual retirement accounts (IRAs) one person can have. A retirement saver could potentially maintain more than one traditional IRA, Roth IRA, rollover IRA, or simplified employee pension (SEP) IRA in order to gain certain tax advantages now, and potentially down the road.

That said, the rules governing these different IRA accounts vary considerably, and combining many IRAs — without running afoul of contribution limits or creating tax issues — can be difficult.

How Many Roth and Traditional IRAs Can You Have?

As mentioned above, you may open any number of individual retirement accounts (IRAs). The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) does not limit the number of IRAs you can have and will not penalize you for having multiple IRAs in your name, as long as you follow the rules and contribution limits for each account.

One or more IRAs could work in tandem with a 401(k) workplace retirement plan. For instance, you might put part of each paycheck into a 401(k) plan at work while also maxing out your traditional IRA contributions every year. There might be restrictions, though, about the amount you can deduct.

An individual’s annual contribution limit — for traditional and Roth IRAs combined — is $7,000 for the 2024 tax year and $6,500 for the 2023 tax year. The limit is $7,500 for savers age 50 or older.

Recommended: What is an IRA?

Types of IRA

The two main account types are the traditional IRA and the Roth IRA. Again, your traditional IRA withdrawals are taxed at your ordinary income tax rate in retirement while Roth IRA money can be withdrawn tax-free.

With a traditional IRA, contributions can provide tax deductions when the money is deposited. Qualified distributions are taxed as ordinary income in retirement. Funds distributed before the account holder reaches age 59 ½ are usually subject to an added 10% tax.

Roth IRA contributions do not qualify for a deduction when deposited. However, when the account holder reaches age 59 ½, the money may be withdrawn tax-free. As with traditional IRAs, you can have multiple Roth IRAs.

There is a third type of IRA, the SEP IRA. These IRAs have higher contribution limits: up to $69,000 for tax year 2024 and $66,000 for tax year 2023, or 25% of compensation, whichever is less. But because these are employer-funded plans, they follow a different set of rules.

If you are self-employed and contributing to a SEP IRA on your own behalf, or if you work for a company with a SEP plan, you may or may not have the option of making traditional IRA contributions — but you could likely contribute to a Roth in addition to the SEP.

You may want to consult with a professional so you don’t over-contribute — or contribute less than you could have — or miss out on any of the potential tax benefits.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Multiple IRAs

Whether it makes sense for you to have multiple IRAs can depend on many factors, including your investment goals, financial situation, marital status, and career plans.

Advantages

Here are some of the chief advantages of maintaining more than one IRA:

•   Tax management. Traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs are taxed differently, as mentioned above. Also, traditional IRAs are subject to required minimum distributions (RMDs), which can increase your taxable income in retirement, while Roth IRAs are not. Having money in both types of IRA could make your retirement investing more tax-efficient.

•   Diversification. Diversification can help manage investment risk. Holding money in multiple IRAs, each with a different investment strategy, could help you create a diversified portfolio.

   Diversification may also benefit you from a tax perspective if you keep less tax-efficient investments in a traditional IRA and more tax-efficient ones in a Roth IRA.

•   Access. Traditional IRAs do not permit early withdrawals before age 59 ½ without triggering a tax penalty. You can, however, withdraw your original contributions from a Roth IRA at any time without owing income tax or penalties on those distributions. Having one IRA of each type could make it less expensive for you to withdraw money early if needed. This is possible whether investing online or not.

•   Avoiding RMDs. Traditional IRAs are subject to RMD rules, which dictate that you must begin taking minimum IRA distributions at age 72. If you don’t, the IRS can levy a steep tax penalty. Roth IRAs aren’t subject to RMD rules, so they could help you hang on to more assets as you age.

Disadvantages

Opening and funding multiple IRAs isn’t always an optimal strategy. Here are some disadvantages that may make you reconsider having several IRAs:

•   Contribution limits. The IRS caps the amount you can contribute in a given year. For 2024, your total contributions to all your IRAs cannot exceed $7,000 (or $8,000 if you’re 50 or older). For 2023, your total contributions to all your IRAs cannot exceed $6,500 (or $7,500 if you’re 50 or older). So having multiple IRAs doesn’t give you an edge in saving up for retirement.

•   Overweighting. When a significant share of your asset allocation is dedicated to a single stock, security, or sector, your portfolio is overweight. This overexposure can heighten your risk profile, such that a downturn in that investment could drag down your entire portfolio. Having multiple IRAs may put you at risk of being overweight if you’re not careful about reviewing the holdings in each account.

•   Fees. Brokerages often charge various fees to maintain IRAs. Plus, within each IRA, you may have to pay additional fees for specific investments. For example, a mutual fund has an annual ownership cost signified by its expense ratio. If you’re not paying attention to each IRA’s fees, it’s possible that you could overpay and shrink your investment returns.

•   Organization. Having multiple IRAs could present an organizational burden in the form of additional paperwork or, if you manage your IRAs online, logging in to multiple brokerages or robo-advisor platforms. You may also worry about increased risk for cybercrime.

Reasons You Might Want More Than One IRA

Evaluating your investment goals can help you decide if having more than one IRA makes sense for you. But you may need extra accounts if you’re:

•   Rolling over a 401(k). When separating from your employer, you could leave your 401(k) money where it is or roll it into a traditional IRA instead. If you open a rollover IRA and already have a Roth account too, you may end up with multiple IRAs.

•   Planning a backdoor Roth. Roth IRAs offer tax-free distributions but there’s a catch: To fund one, you have to meet eligibility requirements pertaining to your income and filing status. People who are over the income limit sometimes work around it by setting up a traditional IRA and later transferring some of that money to a Roth IRA. Taxes are levied on the transferred amount. This arrangement is known as a Roth conversion or backdoor Roth.

•   Married and the sole income-earner. The IRS allows married couples who file a joint tax return to each contribute to IRAs, even when one spouse does not have taxable compensation. So if you’re the breadwinner in your relationship, you could set up an IRA for yourself and open a spousal IRA to make contributions on behalf of your spouse.

•   Self-employed or plan to be. People who are self-employed can use traditional, Roth, or SEP IRAs to save for retirement. You might end up with multiple IRAs if you were an employee who had a traditional or Roth IRA, then later went out on your own as an entrepreneur. You could then open a SEP IRA, which allows for tax-deductible contributions and a higher annual contribution limit ($69,000 in 2024, and $66,000 in 2023).

Reasons You Might Want Your IRAs With Different Companies

Whether you’re planning to open your first IRA or your fifth, it’s important to choose the right place to keep your retirement savings. You can open an IRA with a traditional broker, an online brokerage, or sometimes at your bank or credit union.

So why would you want to have your IRAs in different places? Two big reasons for that center on investment options and insurance.

Setting up IRAs at different brokerages could offer you greater exposure to a wider variety of investments. Every brokerage has its own policies on IRA assets. One brokerage might lean almost exclusively toward investing in exchange-traded funds (ETFs) or index funds, for example, while another might allow you to purchase individual stocks or bonds through your IRA.

You can also benefit from increased insurance coverage. The Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC) insures Roth IRAs and other eligible investment accounts up to $500,000 per person. Under those rules, you could have a traditional IRA at one brokerage and a Roth IRA at another and they’d both be covered up to $500,000.

Note: SIPC coverage only protects you against the possibility of your brokerage failing, not against any financial losses associated with changes in the value of your investments.

How to Transfer an IRA to Another Investment Company

It’s fairly straightforward to move an IRA from one brokerage to another. First you need to set up an IRA at the new brokerage. Then you’d contact your current brokerage to initiate the transfer of some or all of your IRA funds.

You can request a trustee-to-trustee transfer, which allows your current IRA company to move the money to the new IRA on your behalf. No taxes are withheld on the transfer amount and you also avoid the risk of triggering a tax penalty.

The IRS also allows 60-day rollovers, in which you get a distribution from your existing IRA then redeposit it into your new retirement account. Taxes are withheld, so you’ll have to make that amount up when you deposit the money to your new IRA. If you fail to complete the rollover within 60 days, the IRS treats the deal as a taxable distribution.

The Takeaway

Investing in multiple IRAs is perfectly legal and, in theory, you can have an unlimited number of them. The IRS’s annual limits on contributions apply across all your accounts, however. Traditional and Roth IRAs have different tax rules and can sometimes be useful to offset each other. SEP IRAs offer the potential to save more, thanks to their higher contribution limits. Wage earners can often contribute to separate accounts for their non-working spouses, potentially doubling the amount of allowable contributions.

If you have yet to set up an IRA, getting started is easier than you might think. With SoFi Invest, you can open a traditional or Roth IRA. And you may want to consider doing a rollover IRA, where you roll over old 401(k) funds so that you can better manage all your retirement money.

SoFi makes the rollover process seamless and simple, so you don’t have to worry about transferring funds yourself, or potentially incurring a penalty. There are no rollover fees, and you can complete your 401(k) rollover without a lot of time or hassle.

Help grow your nest egg with a SoFi IRA.

FAQ

Does it make sense to have multiple IRAs?

Having more than one IRA could make sense for some people, depending on their investment strategies. When maintaining multiple IRAs, the most important thing to keep in mind are the limits on annual contributions. It’s also helpful to weigh the investment options offered and the fees you might pay to own multiple IRAs.

Can I have both a traditional and a Roth IRA?

Yes, you can have both a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA. However, your total contribution to all your IRAs cannot exceed the annual limits allowed by the IRS.

How many Roth IRAs can I have?

A person can have any number of Roth IRAs. The IRS does, however, set guidelines on who can contribute to a Roth IRA and the maximum amount you can contribute each year.


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INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Investment Risk: Diversification can help reduce some investment risk. It cannot guarantee profit, or fully protect in a down market.

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Should I Put My Bonus Into My 401k? Here's What You Should Consider

Should I Put My Bonus Into My 401k? Here’s What You Should Consider

If you’re wondering what to do with bonus money, you’re not alone. Investing your bonus money in a tax-advantaged retirement account like a 401(k) has some tangible advantages. Not only will the extra cash help your nest egg to grow, you could also see some potential tax benefits.

Of course, we live in a world of competing financial priorities. You could also pay down debt, spend the money on something you need, save for a near-term goal — or splurge! The array of choices can be exciting — but if a secure future is your top goal, it’s important to consider a 401k bonus deferral.

Here are a few strategies to think about before you make a move.

Receiving a Bonus Check

First, a practical reminder. When you get a bonus check, it may not be in the amount that you expected. This is because bonuses are subject to income tax. Knowing how your bonus is taxed can help you understand how much you’ll end up with so you can determine what to do with the money that’s left. The IRS considers bonuses as supplemental wages rather than regular wages.

Ultimately, your employer decides how to treat tax withholding from your bonus. Employers may withhold 22% of your bonus to go toward federal income taxes. But some employers may add your whole bonus to your regular paycheck, and then tax the larger amount at normal income tax rates. If your bonus puts you in a higher tax bracket for that pay period, you may pay more than you expected in taxes.

Also, your bonus may come lumped in with your paycheck (not as a separate payout), which can be confusing.

Whatever the final amount is, or how it arrives, be sure to set aside the full amount while you weigh your options — otherwise you might be tempted to spend it, as behavioral finance research has shown.

What to Do With Bonus Money

There’s nothing wrong with spending some of your hard-earned bonus from your compensation. One rule of thumb is to set a percentage of every windfall (e.g. 10% or 20%) — whether a bonus or a birthday check — to spend, and save the rest.

To get the most out of a bonus, though, many people opt for a 401k bonus deferral and put some or all of it into their 401k account. The amount of your bonus you decide to put in depends on how much you’ve already contributed, and whether it makes sense from a tax perspective.

Contributing to a 401k

The contribution limit for 401k plans in 2024 is $23,000; for those 50 and older you can add another $7,500, for a total of $30,500. The contribution limit for 401k plans in 2023 is $22,500; for those 50 and older you can add another $7,500, for a total of $30,000. If you haven’t reached the limit yet, allocating some of your bonus into your retirement plan can be a great way to boost your retirement savings.

In the case where you’ve already maxed out your 401k contributions, your bonus can also allow you to invest in an IRA or a non-retirement (i.e. taxable) brokerage account.

Contributing to an IRA

If you’ve maxed out your 401k contributions for the year, you may still be able to open a traditional tax-deferred IRA or a Roth IRA. It depends on your income.

In 2024, the contribution limit for traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs is $7,000; with an additional $1,000 catch-up provision if you’re over 50. In 2023, the contribution limit for traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs is $6,500; with an additional $1,000 catch-up provision if you’re over 50. But if your income is over $161,000 (for single filers) or over $240,000 (for married filing jointly) in 2024, you aren’t eligible to contribute to a Roth. For 2023, you can’t contribute to a Roth if your income is over $153,000 (for single filers) or over $228,000 (for married filing jointly). And while a traditional IRA doesn’t have income limits, the picture changes if you’re covered by a workplace plan like a 401k.

If you’re covered by a workplace retirement plan and your income is too high for a Roth, you likely wouldn’t be eligible to open a traditional, tax-deductible IRA either. You could however open a nondeductible IRA. To understand the difference, you may want to consult with a professional.

Recommended: How Much Can You Put in an IRA This Year?

Contributing to a Taxable Account

Of course, when you’re weighing what to do with bonus money, you don’t want to leave out this important option: Opening a taxable account.

While employer-sponsored retirement accounts typically have some restrictions on what you can invest in, taxable brokerage accounts allow you to invest in a wider range of investments. So if your 401k is maxed out, and an IRA isn’t an option for you, you can use your bonus to invest in stocks, bonds, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), mutual funds, and more in a taxable account.

Deferred Compensation

You also may be able to save some of your bonus from taxes by deferring compensation. This is when an employee’s compensation is withheld for distribution at a later date in order to provide future tax benefits.

In this scenario, you could set aside some of your compensation or bonus to be paid in the future. When you defer income, you still need to pay taxes later, at the time you receive your deferred income.

Your Bonus and 401k Tax Breaks

Wondering what to do with a bonus? It’s a smart question to ask. In order to maximize the value of your bonus, you want to make sure you reduce your taxes where you can.

One method that’s frequently used to reduce income taxes on a bonus is adding some of it into a tax-deferred retirement account like a 401k or traditional IRA. The amount of money you put into these accounts typically reduces your taxable income in the year that you deposit it.

Here’s how it works. The amount you contribute to a 401k or traditional IRA is tax deductible, meaning you can deduct the amount you save from your taxable income, often lowering your tax bill. (The same is not true for a Roth IRA or a Roth 401k, where you make contributions on an after-tax basis.)

The annual contribution limits for each of these retirement accounts noted above may vary from year to year. Depending on the size of your bonus and how much you’ve already contributed to your retirement account for a particular year, you may be able to either put some or all of your bonus in a tax-deferred retirement account.

It’s important to keep track of how much you have already contributed to your retirement accounts because you don’t want to put too much of your bonus and exceed the contribution limit. In the case where you have reached the contribution limit, you can put some of your bonus into other tax deferred accounts including a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA.

Recommended: Important Retirement Contribution Limits

How Investing Your Bonus Can Help Over Time

Investing your bonus can help increase its value over the long-run. As your money grows in value over time, it can be used in many ways: You can stow part of it away for retirement, as an emergency fund, a down payment for a home, to pay outstanding debts, or another financial goal.

While it can be helpful to have some of your bonus in cash, your money is better suited invested in an investment vehicle where it works for you and doesn’t lose value due to inflation. If you start investing your bonus each year in either a tax-deferred retirement account or non-retirement account, this will ensure you are steps closer to enjoying greater financial security in the future.

Investing for Retirement With SoFi

The yearly question of what to do with a bonus is a common one. Just having that windfall allows for many financial opportunities, such as saving for immediate needs — or purchasing things you need now. But it may be wisest to use your bonus to boost your retirement nest egg — for the simple reason that you could stand to gain more financially down the road, while also potentially enjoying tax benefits in the present.

The fact is, most people don’t max out their 401k contributions each year, so if you’re in that boat it might make sense to take some or all of your bonus and fill up the gas tank, so to say. If you have maxed out your 401k, you still have options to save for the future via traditional or Roth IRAs, deferred comp, or investing in a taxable account.

A taxable account might offer you different or complementary investment options that could also round out your portfolio.

Keeping in mind the tax implications of where you invest can also help you allocate this extra money where it fits best with your plan.

If you get a bonus this year, you can help grow your retirement savings with SoFi Invest®. It’s easy to set up an Active Invest account and open a traditional or Roth IRA online with SoFi. With either an active or automated approach to investing in these retirement accounts, you can choose from a wide range of investment options and services, such as speaking with financial professionals at no additional cost. Learn more about how to take control of your retirement with SoFi Invest.

FAQ

Is it good to put your bonus into a 401k?

The short answer is yes. It might be wise to put some or all of your bonus in your 401k, depending on how much you’ve contributed to your workplace account already. You want to make sure you don’t exceed the 401k contribution limit.

How can I avoid paying tax on my bonus?

Your bonus will be taxed, but you can lower the amount of your taxable income by depositing some or all of it in a tax-deferred retirement account such as a 401k or IRA. However, this does not mean you will avoid paying taxes completely. Once you withdraw the money from these accounts in retirement, it will be subject to ordinary income tax.

Can I put all of my bonus into a 401k?

Possibly. You can put all of your bonus in your 401k if you haven’t reached the contribution limit for that particular year, and if you won’t surpass it by adding all of your bonus. For 2023, the contribution limit for a 401k is $22,500 if you’re younger than 50 years old; Those over 50 can contribute an additional $7,500 for a total of $30,000.


SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs): Investors should carefully consider the information contained in the prospectus, which contains the Fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other relevant information. You may obtain a prospectus from the Fund company’s website or by email customer service at [email protected]. Please read the prospectus carefully prior to investing.
Shares of ETFs must be bought and sold at market price, which can vary significantly from the Fund’s net asset value (NAV). Investment returns are subject to market volatility and shares may be worth more or less their original value when redeemed. The diversification of an ETF will not protect against loss. An ETF may not achieve its stated investment objective. Rebalancing and other activities within the fund may be subject to tax consequences.



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Custodial Roth IRA: How to Open a Roth IRA For Kids

A Roth IRA can be a retirement savings tool for children as well as adults. Funded with after-tax dollars, a Roth IRA grows tax-free, so account holders won’t need to pay taxes when they withdraw money in retirement as long as the account has been open for at least five years. Plus, the money in a Roth IRA will have many decades to grow if you open it when your child is young.

And while a Roth IRA has an early distribution penalty, that penalty is generally waived for certain expenses, such as paying for qualified college expenses, if your child needs to access those funds. That flexibility can make a Roth IRA appealing.

Can you open a Roth IRA for a child? Yes! A Roth IRA for kids, called a Custodial Roth IRA, can be opened by a parent, grandparent, or other adult for a child of any age, as long as the child earns income (more on that later).

Here’s everything you need to know about a Roth IRA for kids.

What Is a Roth IRA for Kids?

A Roth IRA for kids, also known as a custodial Roth IRA, is an IRA opened by an adult (usually a parent), who manages the account until the child gets full control of it, which is at age 18 or 21 in most states.

A custodial Roth IRA for kids generally operates in the same way a Roth IRA for adults does. The account holder contributes after-tax dollars toward their retirement savings and the money grows tax-free in the account.

In order to open and contribute to a Roth IRA, your child must have earned income.


💡 Quick Tip: Before opening an investment account, know your investment objectives, time horizon, and risk tolerance. These fundamentals will help keep your strategy on track and with the aim of meeting your goals.

Who’s Eligible for a Roth IRA for Kids?

A child of any age can have a Roth IRA for kids. However, to be eligible, a child must have an earned income. Earned income can include the compensation earned from jobs like babysitting, dog walking, or working for an employer.

Custodial Roth IRA Rules

In addition to the standard rules for a Roth IRA, there are specific rules for custodial Roth IRAs. These rules include:

No Minimum Age Limit

A child of any age can have a custodial Roth IRA as long as he or she has earned income.

A Child Must Have Earned Income

In order to open a custodial Roth IRA, a child must have earned income. The IRS generally defines earned income as taxable income, wages, and tips. This can also include self-employment, such as yard work or babysitting. Cash gifts given to a child do not count as earned income.

There Are Contribution Limits

The contribution limit for a Roth IRA is $7,000 for 2024 ($8,000 for those 50 and older), or the total of the individual’s earned income for the year, whichever is less.

In addition, a child (or an adult on behalf of a child) cannot contribute an amount greater than the child’s earned income. So if a child earned $2,000 as a lifeguard at the local swimming pool, for example, the most that can be contributed to the child’s custodial IRA that year, including contributions from parents, is $2,000.

Certain Early Withdrawals Are Allowed

In general, you can withdraw contributions from a Roth IRA at any time without penalty. Earnings typically can’t be withdrawn before age 59 ½ without penalty except in certain circumstances. Allowable exceptions include withdrawals up to certain limits to pay for qualified college expenses, cover certain medical bills, and to buy a first home.

Eventual Conversion to a Regular Roth IRA

When the child reaches the legal age in their state (typically 18 or 21, depending on the state), the custodial Roth IRA will need to be converted to a regular Roth IRA in the child’s name.

Get a 2% IRA match. Tax season is now match season.

Get a 2% match on all your SoFi IRA contributions* through Tax Day (up to the annual contribution limits). Plus, funding your IRA may reduce taxes.


*Offer lasts through Tax Day, 4/15/24. Only offers made via ACH are eligible for the match. ACATs, wires, and rollovers are not included.

How to Open a Custodial Roth IRA for a Kid

A Roth IRA for kids can be opened by any adult, such as a parent or grandparent, for instance. While the child is a minor, the adult will have sole access to the account; once the child comes of age (the timing of which varies by state), the account will transfer over to the child.

As with any Roth IRA, investment options within the account can include stocks, bonds, and mutual funds.

A Roth IRA can be opened through a financial institution or brokerage firm. You can typically open the account online by providing some basic information about yourself and your child. Choosing the right institution and Roth IRA offering depends on the investor and their preferences, so be sure to do some research.


💡 Quick Tip: Did you know that you must choose the investments in your IRA? Once you open a new IRA and start saving, you get to decide which mutual funds, ETFs, or other investments you want — it’s totally up to you.

Benefits of Starting a Roth IRA for a Child

Flexibility in how to use the funds can be one benefit of opening a custodial Roth IRA as part of an investment plan for your child. A Roth IRA can provide flexibility not only for potential expenses in early adulthood — such as college expenses or buying a home — but can be an investment vehicle throughout your child’s lifetime.

Another benefit is that a Roth IRA typically gives you more control over investments than an education-focused 529 college savings plan, and it may allow you to create a diversified portfolio of different asset classes.

A Roth IRA is a gift that can keep growing, since investors can potentially maximize compounding returns to get the most out of their investment. Here’s how a Roth IRA may unlock the power of compounding: As an example, let’s say you open a custodial Roth IRA when the child is 10 years old, and contribute $2,000 annually. At a certain point, your child might take over contributing $2,000 annually.

Assuming a 7% rate of return, the account will be worth $928,000 by the time your child is 60 years old — even though the amount you and your child contributed would be $100,000 in total. In comparison, if that same money was put in a taxable savings account over the same time period, the total of the account would be approximately $515,764.

And unlike a traditional IRA, there is no required minimum distribution (RMD) on a Roth IRA once the account owner reaches retirement age. A Roth IRA also allows people to continue contributing throughout their lifetime, as long as they’re earning income.

Alternatives to a Roth IRA for a Kid

If you’re looking for other possible investments for your child, some options to consider include the following.

•   Savings account: A parent can open a savings account for a child, as long as the parent is a joint account holder. Savings accounts typically have low interest rates (as of January 2024, the average interest rate for a savings account was 0.47%), so you might want to look for a high-yield savings account instead. These accounts have average interest rates of more than 4% as of early 2024.

•   Savings bonds: If your child doesn’t have earned income, you may want to consider savings bonds. However, savings bonds don’t offer the same potential tax advantages a Roth IRA does since you have to pay federal income tax on the bonds when they mature or you cash them. You won’t pay income taxes on Roth IRA earnings unless you take a non-qualified distribution.

•   529 plans: These plans can help you save for your child’s education. You can typically invest the money you contribute to a 529 plan and choose from a wide range of investment options. While these plans aren’t tax deductible at the federal level, your state may offer tax breaks for contributions made to them. And funds can be withdrawn tax-free for qualified education expenses. As of 2024, money left in a 529 may be rolled over to a Roth IRA for your child, although certain conditions and limits may apply.

•   UGMA/UTMA accounts: A Uniform Gifts to Minors Act (UGMA) account and a Uniform Transfers to Minors Act (UTMA) account are custodial accounts in which an adult can invest on behalf of a child. These accounts are typically used to invest in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and so on. There are no contribution or income limits, and gifts below the annual gift threshold do not need to be reported. However, there are no tax benefits when contributions are made, and earnings are made to these accounts, and earnings are subject to taxes. When the child reaches legal age, they take over control of the account.

The Takeaway

For a child with earned income, a custodial Roth IRA may be a good way to help them prepare for their future and get started on the path to investing. A child does need to have an earned income to open a custodial Roth IRA, and contributions cannot exceed their income. If your child qualifies, a Roth IRA for kids could potentially give them years of tax-free growth on their money.

Ready to invest in your goals? It’s easy to get started when you open an investment account with SoFi Invest. You can invest in stocks, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), mutual funds, alternative funds, and more. SoFi doesn’t charge commissions, but other fees apply (full fee disclosure here).


Invest with as little as $5 with a SoFi Active Investing account.

FAQ

Can you open a Roth IRA for a child if they don’t earn income?

No. A child must have earned income — which the IRS defines as wages, salaries, tips and other taxable employee compensation, as well as net earnings from self-employment — in order to open a custodial Roth IRA.

Can you open a Roth IRA for a baby?

It’s possible to open an IRA for a baby. As long as a baby earns an income — modeling baby clothes, for instance — you can open a custodial Roth IRA for them. There is no minimum age to open a custodial Roth IRA, but the child must have earned income.

Is it a good idea to open a Roth IRA for a child?

It may be a good idea to open a Roth IRA for a child for several reasons. A Roth IRA can help a child save up for and cover certain expenses in early adulthood, such as qualified college expenses. Also, a Roth IRA typically has higher returns than a savings account. And because kids have a low tax rate now, when contributions are made, it makes sense to open a Roth IRA, which is taxed upfront. At retirement, as long as they are at least age 59 ½, they can withdraw the money tax-free.

Can I give my child money for a Roth IRA?

Yes, you can contribute to your child’s IRA. However, annual contributions to the account cannot exceed the child’s annual earned income. Also, per IRS rules, the overall amount you can contribute to a Roth IRA is to $7,000 in 2024 for individuals under age 50, or the total annual earned income, whichever is less.

What is the disadvantage of a Roth IRA for kids?

One potential disadvantage of an IRA for kids is that your child must earn an income in order to open and contribute to an account. In addition, you can only contribute the amount the child earns. So if the child makes $500 for the year babysitting, that is the most you can contribute to their custodial Roth IRA.

Can I open a Roth IRA for my 2 year old?

As long as your 2-year-old earns an income, you can open a custodial Roth IRA for them. There is no minimum age requirement for a Roth IRA for kids.

How do I prove my child’s income for a Roth IRA?

If your child receives a W-2 or 1099 form for work they did for an employer, you can use those documents to prove your child’s income. However, if they are self-employed and do work like babysitting, dog walking or yard work to earn money, you should keep receipts or records of the type of work they did, the amount they earned, when the work was done, and who it was for, as proof of their income.

What happens to a custodial Roth IRA when the child turns 18?

Once a child is of legal age, which is typically 18 or 21, depending on your state, the IRA must be converted to a regular Roth IRA in the child’s name that they then own and manage.

Do children need to file a tax return to fund their Roth IRA?

As long as their income is below the threshold that requires them to file a tax return, children are typically not required to file a tax return just because they have a custodial IRA. However, you may want to consult with a tax professional about your specific situation.


Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

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