How Much Will a $150,000 Mortgage Cost?

A $150,000 mortgage will cost a total of $341,318 over the lifetime of the loan, assuming an interest rate of 6.5% and a 30-year term. It might be tempting to think that a $150,000 mortgage will cost…well, $150,000. But lenders need to earn a living for their services and mortgage loans come with interest.

What’s the True Cost of a $150,000 Mortgage?

The specific price you will pay to borrow $150,000 depends on your interest rate — which, in turn, is based on a wide range of factors including your credit score, income stability, and much more. Here’s what you need to know to get an estimate of how much a $150,000 home mortgage loan might cost in your specific circumstances.


💡 Quick Tip: If you refinance your mortgage and shorten your loan term, you could save a substantial amount in interest over the lifetime of the loan.

First-time homebuyers can
prequalify for a SoFi mortgage loan,
with as little as 3% down.


Where Do You Get a $150,000 Mortgage?

Good news: There are many banks and institutions that offer $150,000 mortgages. For 2024, the maximum amount for most conventional loans is more than $750,000, so the loan you’re considering is well within reach. To see how your salary, debts, and down payment savings affect how much home you can afford, use a home affordability calculator.

However, it’s important to understand that even a $150,000 mortgage may cost far more than the sticker price after interest and associated fees. For instance, let’s say you purchase a $200,000 home with a 25% down payment and a $150,000 mortgage. If your interest rate is 7% and your loan term is 30 years, the total amount you’d pay over that time is $359,263.35 — which means you’d actually pay more than the home price ($209,263.35) in interest alone. (And that’s before closing costs, home insurance, property taxes, or mortgage insurance.)

At prices like that, it may seem like taking out a mortgage at all is a bad deal. Fortunately, property has a tendency to increase in value (or appreciate) over time, which helps offset the overall cost of interest. (Of course, nothing is guaranteed.)

Keep in mind that you can potentially lower the interest rate you qualify for by lowering your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio, improving your credit score, or increasing your cash flow by getting a better-paying job. Even a small decrease in interest can have a big effect over the lifetime of a loan. In our example above, with all else being equal, you’d pay only $139,883.68 in interest if your rate were 5% instead of 7% — a savings of nearly $70,000!

Recommended: The Best Affordable Places to Live in the U.S.

Monthly Payments for a $150,000 Mortgage

When you take out a $150,000 mortgage, you’ll repay it over time in monthly installments — of a fixed amount, if you have a fixed mortgage, or amounts that can change if you take out a variable rate loan.

Your monthly $150K mortgage payment includes both principal (the amount you borrowed) and interest (the amount you’re being charged), and may also wrap in your property taxes, homeowners insurance, and mortgage insurance if applicable. (You’ll only need to pay mortgage insurance if your down payment is less than 20%.)

But there is another caveat here that some first-time homebuyers don’t know about. Even if your mortgage payments are fixed each month, the proportion of how much principal you’re paying to how much interest you’re paying does change over time — a process known as the amortization of the loan. It’s a big word, but its bottom line is simple: Earlier on in the loan’s life, you’re likely paying more interest than principal, which increases the amount of money the bank earns overall. Later on in the loan, you’ll usually pay more principal than interest.

What to Consider Before Applying for a $150,000 Mortgage

Amortization is important to understand because it can affect your future financial decisions. For example, if you’re not planning on staying in your house for many years, you may find you have less equity in your home than you originally imagined by the time you’re ready to sell — because the bulk of your mortgage payments thus far have been going toward interest. It might also affect when it makes sense to refinance your mortgage.

Most lenders make it easy to make larger payments or additional payments against the principal you owe so that you can chip away at your debt total faster, but be sure to double-check that your lender doesn’t have early repayment penalties.

Of course, there are different types of home loans. Here are some sample amortization schedules for two $150,000 home loans. (You can also build your own based on your specific details with a mortgage calculator or an amortization calculator online.)

Amortization Schedule, 30-year, 7% Fixed

Years Since Purchase Beginning Balance Monthly Payment Total Interest Paid Total Principal Paid Remaining Balance
1 $150,000 $997.95 $10,451.73 $1,523.71 $148,476.29
3 $146,842.42 $997.95 $10,223.47 $1,751.98 $145,090.44
5 $143,211.82 $997.95 $9,961.01 $2,014.43 $141,197.38
10 $131,574.29 $997.95 $9,119.73 $2,855.71 $128,718.58
15 $115,076.63 $997.95 $7,927.12 $4,048.33 $111,028.30
20 $91,689.13 $997.95 $6,236.43 $5,739.01 $85,950.12
30 $11,533.47 $997.95 $441.97 $11,975.44 $0.00

Notice that, for more than the first half of the loan’s lifetime, you’ll pay substantially more interest than principal each year — even though your mortgage payments remain fixed in amount.

Amortization Schedule, 15-year, 7% Fixed

Years Since Purchase Beginning Balance Monthly Payment Total Interest Paid Total Principal Paid Remaining Balance
1 $150,000 $1,348.24 $10,314.21 $5,864.70 $144,135.30
3 $137,846.65 $1,348.24 $9,435.65 $6,743.26 $131,103.38
5 $123,872.65 $1,348.24 $8,425.46 $7,753.45 $116,119.20
7 $107,805.26 $1,348.24 $7,263.95 $8,914.96 $98,890.30
10 $79,080.41 $1,348.24 $5,187.43 $10,991.48 $68,088.93
12 $56,302.87 $1,348.24 $3,540.84 $12,638.07 $43,664.80
15 $15,581.80 $1,348.24 $597.11 $15,581.80 $0.00

While a shorter loan term may help you build equity in your home more quickly, it comes at the cost of a higher monthly payment.

How to Get a $150,000 Mortgage

To apply for a $150,000 mortgage, you can search for providers online or go into a local brick-and-mortar bank or credit union you trust. You’ll need to provide a variety of information to qualify for the loan, including your employment history, income level, credit score, debt level, and more.

The higher your credit score, lower your debt, and more robust your cash flow, the more likely you are to qualify for a $150,000 mortgage — and, ideally, one at the lowest possible interest rate. That said, mortgage interest rates are also subject to market influences and fluctuations, and sometimes rates are simply higher than others overall.


💡 Quick Tip: To see a house in person, particularly in a tight or expensive market, you may need to show the real estate agent proof that you’re preapproved for a mortgage. SoFi’s online application makes the process simple.

The Takeaway

A $150,000 mortgage can actually cost far more than $150,000. Depending on your interest rate and your loan term, you may spend more than you borrowed in principal in the first place on interest, and you’ll likely pay a higher proportional amount of interest per monthly payment for about the first half of your loan’s lifetime.

Looking for an affordable option for a home mortgage loan? SoFi can help: We offer low down payments (as little as 3% - 5%*) with our competitive and flexible home mortgage loans. Plus, applying is extra convenient: It's online, with access to one-on-one help.

SoFi Mortgages: simple, smart, and so affordable.

FAQ

How much is $150K mortgage a month?

A 30-year, $150,000 mortgage at a 7% fixed interest rate will be about $998 per month (not including property taxes or mortgage interest), while a 15-year mortgage at the same rate would cost about $1,348 monthly. The exact monthly payment you owe on a $150,000 mortgage will vary depending on factors like your interest rate and what other fees, like mortgage insurance, are rolled into the bill.

How much income is required for a $150,000 mortgage?

Those who earn about $55,000 or more per year may be more likely to qualify for a $150,000 mortgage than those who earn less. Although your income is an important marker for lenders, it’s far from the only one — and even people who earn a lot of money may not qualify for a mortgage if they have a high debt total or a poor credit score. (Still, the best way to learn whether or not you qualify is to ask your lender.)

How much is a downpayment on a $150,000 mortgage?

To avoid paying mortgage insurance, you’d want to put down 20% of the home’s purchase price, which if you are borrowing $150,000 would be $50,000 for a home priced at $200,000. Some lenders allow you to put down as little as 3.5% of the home’s price. So if you had a $150,000 mortgage and put down 3.5%, your down payment would be $5,440 and the home price would be $155,440. (Keep in mind these figures do not include closing costs.)

Can I afford a $150K house with $70K salary?

Yes, as long as you don’t have a lot of other debt, you can probably afford a $150,000 home if you’re making $70,000 a year. There’s a basic rule of thumb to spend less than a third of your gross income on your housing. With an income of $70,000 per year, you’re making about $5,833.33 per month before taxes — and a third of that figure is $1,925. A $150,000 mortgage might have a monthly payment of as little as $998 per month, even with a 7% interest rate, so it should be affordable for you as long as you don’t have other substantial debts.


SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


SoFi Mortgages
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. Not all products are available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.


*SoFi requires Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) for conforming home loans with a loan-to-value (LTV) ratio greater than 80%. As little as 3% down payments are for qualifying first-time homebuyers only. 5% minimum applies to other borrowers. Other loan types may require different fees or insurance (e.g., VA funding fee, FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums, etc.). Loan requirements may vary depending on your down payment amount, and minimum down payment varies by loan type.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Tax Information: This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice.

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I Make $50,000 a Year, How Much House Can I Afford?

On a salary of $50,000 per year, you can afford a house priced at around $128,000 with a monthly payment of $1,200 — that is, as long as you have relatively little debt already on your plate. However, not everyone earning $50,000 will see this number in response to a loan application. There are many more factors besides income and debt to take into account, such as:

•   Your down payment

•   The cost of taxes and insurance for the home you want

•   The interest rate

•   The type of loan you’re applying for

•   Your lender’s tolerance for debt levels

Each of these factors affects how much home you can afford on any salary, including one at $50,000.

What Kind of House Can I Afford With $50K a Year?

$50,000 is a solid salary, but there’s no denying today’s real estate market is tough. You’ll need to know the full picture of home affordability to get you into the house you want, starting with your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio.

First-time homebuyers can
prequalify for a SoFi mortgage loan,
with as little as 3% down.


Understanding Debt-to-income Ratio

Your DTI ratio may be one of your biggest challenges to home affordability. Each debt that you have a monthly payment for takes away from what you could be paying on a mortgage, lowering the mortgage amount that you can qualify for.

To calculate your DTI ratio, combine your monthly debt payments such as credit card debts, student loan payments, and car payments and then divide the total by your monthly income. This will give you a percentage (or ratio) of how much you’re spending on debt each month. Lenders look for 36% or less for most home mortgage loans.

For example, on a $50,000 annual salary and a $4,166 monthly income, your maximum DTI ratio of 36% would be $1,500. This is the maximum amount of debt lenders want to see on a $50,000 salary.


💡 Quick Tip: Lowering your monthly payments with a mortgage refinance from SoFi can help you find money to pay down other debt, build your rainy-day fund, or put more into your 401(k).

How to Factor in Your Down Payment

A down payment increases how much home you’ll be able to qualify for. The more you’re able to put down, the more home you’ll be able to afford. Borrowers who put down more than 20% also avoid having to buy mortgage insurance. When you don’t have to pay mortgage insurance every month, you can qualify for a higher mortgage — but you do need to consider if putting down 20% is worth it to you. A mortgage calculator can help you see how much your down payment affects the mortgage you can qualify for.

Factors That Affect Home Affordability

In addition to the debt-to-income ratio and down payment, there are a handful of other variables that affect home affordability. These are:

•   Interest rates When your interest rate is lower, you’ll either have a lower monthly mortgage payment or qualify for a higher mortgage. With higher interest rates, you’ll have a higher monthly mortgage payment and/or qualify for a lower home purchase amount.

•   Credit history and score Your credit score affects what interest rate you’ll be able to get, which is a huge factor in determining your monthly mortgage payment and home affordability.

•   Taxes and insurance Higher taxes, insurance, or homeowners association dues can bite into your house budget. Each of these factors has to be accounted for by your lender.

•   Loan type Different loan types have varying interest rates, down payments, credit requirements, and mortgage insurance requirements which can affect how much house you can afford.

•   Lender You may be able to find a lender that allows for a DTI ratio that is higher than the standard 36%. (Some lenders allow a DTI as high as 50%.)

•   Location Where you buy affects how much house you can afford. This is one area that you can’t control, unless you move. If you are considering this option, take a look at the best affordable places to live in the U.S.

Recommended: The Cost of Living by State

How to Afford More House With Down Payment Assistance

If you want to be able to afford a more costly house, you may want to look into a down payment assistance (DPA) program. These programs can help you with funding for a down payment on a mortgage. You can look for DPA programs with your state or local housing authority. Preference may be given to first-time homebuyers or lower-income families, but there are programs available for a wide variety of situations and incomes.

How to Calculate How Much House You Can Afford

If you want to know how much mortgage you’ll likely be able to qualify for, you’ll want to take a look at these guidelines.

The 28/36 Rule: Lenders look for home payments to be at or below 28% of your income. Total debt payments should be less than 36% of your income. These are the front-end and back-end ratios you may hear your mortgage lender talking about.

Front-end ratio (28%): At 28% or your income, a monthly housing payment from a monthly income of $4,166 should be no more than $1,166.

Back-end ratio (36%): To calculate the back-end, or debt-to-income ratio, add your debt together and divide it by your income. This includes the new mortgage payment. With monthly income at $4,166, your debts should be no more than $1,500 ($4,166*.36).

The 35/45 Rule: The 35/45 rule is a higher debt level your lender can elect to follow. It’s riskier for them and may come at a higher interest rate for you. This rule allows you housing payment to be 35% of your monthly income and 45% of your total debt-to-income ratio. With a monthly income of $4,166, the housing allowance (35% of your income) increases to $1,458 and the total monthly debt (45% of your income) increases to $1,875.

An easier way to calculate how much home you can afford is with a home affordability calculator.

Home Affordability Examples

Making $50,000 a year gives you around $4,166 to work with each month. Using the 36% debt-to-income ratio, you can have a maximum debt payments of $1,500 ($4,166 * .36). In the examples below, taxes ($2,500), insurance ($1,000), and interest rate (6%) remain the same for a 30-year loan term.

Example #1: High-debt Borrower
Monthly credit card debt: $200
Monthly car payment: $400
Student loan payment: $200
Total debt = $800

Down payment = $20,000

Maximum DTI ratio = $4,166 * .36 = $1,500
Maximum mortgage payment = $700 ($1,500 – $800)

Home budget = $88,107

Example #2: The Super Saver
Monthly credit card debt: $0
Monthly car payment: $200
Student loan payment: $0
Total debt = $200

Down payment: $20,000

Maximum DTI ratio = $4,166 * .36 = $1,500
Maximum mortgage payment = $1,300 ($1,500 – $200)

Home budget = $171,925

Recommended: Tips to Qualify for a Mortgage

How Your Monthly Payment Affects Your Price Range

Your monthly payment directly affects the mortgage you’re able to qualify for. The more monthly debts you have, the lower the mortgage you’ll be able to qualify for. That’s why it’s so important to take care of debts as soon as you can.

That’s also why it’s important to get the best interest rate you can. Shopping around for lenders and improving your credit score can both save you money and improve home affordability. A home loan help center is a good place to start the process of looking for a mortgage.

Types of Home Loans Available to $50K Households

How much home you can afford also comes down to the different types of mortgage loans. Here are some common options:

•   FHA loans If your credit isn’t ideal, you may be able to secure a Federal Housing Administration mortgage. Though FHA loans are costlier, you can still be considered with a credit score as low as 500. FHA mortgage insurance, however, makes them more expensive than their alternatives.

•   USDA loans If you’re in a rural area that is covered by United States Department of Agriculture loans, you’ll want to consider whether the low interest, no-down-loan will make sense for you.

•   Conventional loans Conventional financing offers the most competitive interest rates and terms for mortgage applicants who qualify.

•   VA loans If you have the option of financing with a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs loan, with few exceptions, you’ll generally want to take it. It offers some of the most competitive rates, even for zero-down-payment loans. It also comes with no minimum credit score requirement, though the final say on whether or not you can get a loan with a low credit score is up to the individual lender.


💡 Quick Tip: Don’t have a lot of cash on hand for a down payment? The minimum down payment for an FHA mortgage loan is as low as 3.5%.1

The Takeaway

Your $50,000 salary is the first step in qualifying for the home mortgage loan you need to buy a house. To position yourself for the best possible borrowing scenario, consider paying down debt, working on your credit score, applying for down payment assistance, adding a co-borrower, or some combination of the above. With these moves, home affordability improves a great deal.

Looking for an affordable option for a home mortgage loan? SoFi can help: We offer low down payments (as little as 3% - 5%*) with our competitive and flexible home mortgage loans. Plus, applying is extra convenient: It's online, with access to one-on-one help.

SoFi Mortgages: simple, smart, and so affordable.

FAQ

Is $50K a good salary for a single person?

A $50,000 salary is good in terms of covering the cost of living in many parts of the U.S. and with proper budgeting it can even put you on the path to affording to purchase your own home.

What is a comfortable income for a single person?

A comfortable income for a single person could be at or above the median income for a single person, which is $56,929 according to data from the U.S. Census.

What is a liveable wage in 2024?

Your living wage depends on your local region, number of working household members, and children. For a single person living in Arizona, the average living wage is about $37,000. If the same person moved to California, an average of more than $44,000 would be needed, according to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Living Wage Calculator.

What salary is considered rich for a single person?

A salary of $234,342 would put you in the top 5% of wage earners in the United States.


Photo credit: iStock/Tirachard

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


SoFi Mortgages
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. Not all products are available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.


*SoFi requires Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) for conforming home loans with a loan-to-value (LTV) ratio greater than 80%. As little as 3% down payments are for qualifying first-time homebuyers only. 5% minimum applies to other borrowers. Other loan types may require different fees or insurance (e.g., VA funding fee, FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums, etc.). Loan requirements may vary depending on your down payment amount, and minimum down payment varies by loan type.

¹FHA loans are subject to unique terms and conditions established by FHA and SoFi. Ask your SoFi loan officer for details about eligibility, documentation, and other requirements. FHA loans require an Upfront Mortgage Insurance Premium (UFMIP), which may be financed or paid at closing, in addition to monthly Mortgage Insurance Premiums (MIP). Maximum loan amounts vary by county. The minimum FHA mortgage down payment is 3.5% for those who qualify financially for a primary purchase. SoFi is not affiliated with any government agency.
Veterans, Service members, and members of the National Guard or Reserve may be eligible for a loan guaranteed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. VA loans are subject to unique terms and conditions established by VA and SoFi. Ask your SoFi loan officer for details about eligibility, documentation, and other requirements. VA loans typically require a one-time funding fee except as may be exempted by VA guidelines. The fee may be financed or paid at closing. The amount of the fee depends on the type of loan, the total amount of the loan, and, depending on loan type, prior use of VA eligibility and down payment amount. The VA funding fee is typically non-refundable. SoFi is not affiliated with any government agency.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

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I Make $36,000 a Year, How Much House Can I Afford?

On a salary of $36,000 per year, you can afford a house priced around $100,000-$110,000 with a monthly payment of just over $1,000. This assumes you have no other debts you’re paying off, but also that you haven’t been able to save much for a down payment.

Of course, you’ll want to talk to a lender for your individual situation, which could qualify you for more (or less). If it sounds overwhelming, don’t worry. We’ll walk you through what it takes to qualify for a home, no matter what your income level is.

What Kind of House Can I Afford With $36K a Year?

At a $36,000 annual income, you may need some help affording a home in today’s market. You’ll need to eliminate debt and make sure you have a good credit score, as well as find programs and lenders that can help. In addition to income and debt, your lender will take into account:

•   Your down payment savings

•   What taxes and insurance will cost

•   What interest rate you qualify for

•   The type of loan you’re applying for

•   Whether or not they can let your debt run up to 50% of your income

First-time homebuyers can
prequalify for a SoFi mortgage loan,
with as little as 3% down.


Understanding Debt-to-income Ratio

Beyond interest rates, debt is your biggest enemy to home affordability. The more debt you have to pay on a monthly basis, the less you’re able to pay toward a mortgage. In other words, your $200 monthly credit card payment could cost you thousands on the purchase price of a home.

To understand the debt-to-income ratio (DTI), add all of your debts together, and then divide that number by your monthly income. Your lender calculates your DTI ratio to determine how much you can afford as a monthly payment on a mortgage. The guideline is 36%, but some lenders can go higher on a home mortgage loan.


💡 Quick Tip: To see a house in person, particularly in a tight or expensive market, you may need to show the real estate agent proof that you’re preapproved for a mortgage. SoFi’s online application makes the process simple.

How to Factor in Your Down Payment

A down payment increases how much home you’ll be able to qualify for. The more you’re able to put down, the more home you’ll be able to afford.

You’ll also want to consider whether you can put down a deposit of more than 20% so you don’t have to buy mortgage insurance. This may help you qualify for a higher mortgage. Use a mortgage calculator to see how a down payment affects home affordability.

Factors That Affect Home Affordability

Home affordability goes beyond your down payment and DTI ratio. You also want to look at:

•   Interest rates When interest rates are high, borrowers qualify for a lower mortgage. When they’re low, it may be possible to qualify for a higher mortgage.

•   Credit history and score Your credit score is a reflection of your credit habits, and with a higher credit score, you’ll qualify for the best interest rates, giving you more buying power.

•   Taxes and insurance If you live in an area with higher taxes, insurance, or homeowners association dues, these will be taken into account by your lender. You’ll qualify for a lower mortgage amount when these numbers are high.

•   Loan type Depending on the type of loan you get, your interest rate, credit score, and down payment amount can affect how much house you can afford.

•   Lender Lenders have the final say when it comes to approving you for a mortgage. In special circumstances, you may be able to qualify for more than a 36% DTI ratio. Some lenders approve borrowers with a DTI ratio around 50%.

•   Location If you’re shopping in a state with a high cost of living, you’ll have a hard time qualifying for a mortgage no matter what your income level is. If you’re considering other areas, you may want to look at the best affordable places to live in the U.S.

How to Afford More House With Down Payment Assistance

Down payment assistance programs can help you qualify for a larger mortgage. These types of programs have money to help with down payment or closing costs. They are usually offered at the state or local level with both grant and second mortgage programs. They may limit participation to first-time homebuyers or borrowers with lower incomes, but you should still look into these programs and see if you can qualify.

Examples include CalHFA MyHome Assistance Program and the “Home Sweet Texas” Home Loan Program. You can look for programs in your own state, county, and city.

Recommended: Tips to Qualify for a Mortgage

How to Calculate How Much House You Can Afford

Knowing how much home you are likely to qualify for doesn’t have to be a mystery. While your lender may have flexibility, they generally follow these guidelines:

The 28/36 Rule: Lenders will look for housing payments (including mortgage, taxes, and insurance) to be more more than 28% of your income and total debt payments (including mortgage, car loan, student loan, etc.) to be less than 36% of your income.

The 35/45 Rule: Some lenders allow for higher debt levels. This rule says the housing payment can be up to 35% of your income and total debt to be 45%.

An easy way to calculate how much home you can afford is with a home affordability calculator.

Home Affordability Examples

On a $36,000 annual salary, you’ll have $3,000 each month for expenses. Using the 36% debt-to-income ratio, you can have a maximum debt payments of $1,080 ($3,000 * .36). In the two examples below, taxes ($2,500), insurance ($1,000), and interest (6%) are the same for a 30-year loan term.

Example #1: Debt limits home affordability, even with large down payment

Monthly credit card debt: $100
Monthly car payment: $500
Student loan payment: $100
Total debt = $700

Down payment = $20,000

Maximum DTI ratio = $3,000 * .36 = $1,080
Maximum mortgage payment = $380 ($1,080 – $700)

Home budget on $36,000 salary = $34,733

Example #2: No down payment, but little debt

Monthly credit card debt: $0
Monthly car payment: $0
Student loan payment: $100
Total debt = $100

Down payment: $0

Maximum DTI ratio = $3,000 * .36 = $1,080
Maximum mortgage payment = $980 ($1,080 – $100)

Home budget on $36,000 salary = $96,314

How Your Monthly Payment Affects Your Price Range

The amount you’re able to pay toward a mortgage each month determines how much home you’ll be able to afford. Any monthly payments you have, such as debt, can take away from how much you’re able to pay for a mortgage. Conversely, how much income you earn in a month can improve how much mortgage you can qualify for.

Interest rates also play a huge role in your monthly payment. Higher interest rates mean you’ll qualify for a lower mortgage while lower interest rates improve home affordability. That’s why homeowners get a mortgage refinance when interest rates drop.

Recommended: Home Loan Help Center

Types of Home Loans Available to $36K Households

The different types of mortgage loans also affect home affordability. Some have a zero down payment option, flexible credit requirements, less expensive mortgage insurance, and varying interest rates. You’ll want to consult with your lender to determine what loan type of right for you.

•   FHA loans: Loans backed by the Federal Housing Administration are great for buyers with unique credit situations that can’t get approved for conventional financing. It can be more expensive to go with an FHA loan, but there are low down payment options and flexible credit requirements for those with a score as low as 500.

•   USDA loans: United States Department of Agriculture mortgages, available in rural areas, offer great interest rates, zero down payment options, and competitive mortgage insurance rates. Some USDA mortgages are directly serviced by USDA, and have a subsidized interest rate.

•   Conventional loans: Many borrowers opt for conventional financing if they qualify. Over the course of a mortgage, this is one of the least expensive types due to competitive interest rates and mortgage insurance premiums that drop off after you pay down the loan past 80%.

•   VA loans: A loan from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is hard to beat for service members, veterans, and others who qualify. You may be able to qualify for a home purchase price with no down payment. VA loans may have great interest rates and flexible credit requirements (depending on the lender).


💡 Quick Tip: Active duty service members who have served for at least 90 consecutive days are eligible for a VA loan. But so are many veterans, surviving spouses, and National Guard and Reserves members. It’s worth exploring with an online VA loan application because the low interest rates and other advantages of this loan can’t be beat.†

The Takeaway

Purchasing a home on a $36,000 salary is a feat you’ll need help with in a market where the U.S. median sale price tops $342,000. Whether it’s down payment assistance, paying down debt, nurturing your credit score, or adding income, there are a lot of moves you can make to bolster your home budget. In the end, when you move into a place that’s all yours, the hard work will be worth it.

Looking for an affordable option for a home mortgage loan? SoFi can help: We offer low down payments (as little as 3% - 5%*) with our competitive and flexible home mortgage loans. Plus, applying is extra convenient: It's online, with access to one-on-one help.

SoFi Mortgages: simple, smart, and so affordable.

FAQ

Is $36K a good salary for a single person?

A single person can afford to live on $36,000 a year in more affordable places in the U.S., but it could still be difficult to afford to buy a home in today’s real estate market.

What is a comfortable income for a single person?

The median income for a single person is $56,929, according to data from the U.S. Census, but a comfortable income for a single person depends on your lifestyle.

What is a liveable wage in 2024?

What is livable varies greatly by location. For a single person living in San Francisco, a living wage is equivalent to $26.63 per hour. In other cities, it’s considerably less.

What salary is considered rich for a single person?

If you make more than $234,342 per year, you would make more than 95% of earners in the United States. But what feels “rich” is going to depend on your lifestyle and where you live.


Photo credit: iStock/mapodile

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


SoFi Mortgages
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. Not all products are available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.


*SoFi requires Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) for conforming home loans with a loan-to-value (LTV) ratio greater than 80%. As little as 3% down payments are for qualifying first-time homebuyers only. 5% minimum applies to other borrowers. Other loan types may require different fees or insurance (e.g., VA funding fee, FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums, etc.). Loan requirements may vary depending on your down payment amount, and minimum down payment varies by loan type.

Veterans, Service members, and members of the National Guard or Reserve may be eligible for a loan guaranteed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. VA loans are subject to unique terms and conditions established by VA and SoFi. Ask your SoFi loan officer for details about eligibility, documentation, and other requirements. VA loans typically require a one-time funding fee except as may be exempted by VA guidelines. The fee may be financed or paid at closing. The amount of the fee depends on the type of loan, the total amount of the loan, and, depending on loan type, prior use of VA eligibility and down payment amount. The VA funding fee is typically non-refundable. SoFi is not affiliated with any government agency.
¹FHA loans are subject to unique terms and conditions established by FHA and SoFi. Ask your SoFi loan officer for details about eligibility, documentation, and other requirements. FHA loans require an Upfront Mortgage Insurance Premium (UFMIP), which may be financed or paid at closing, in addition to monthly Mortgage Insurance Premiums (MIP). Maximum loan amounts vary by county. The minimum FHA mortgage down payment is 3.5% for those who qualify financially for a primary purchase. SoFi is not affiliated with any government agency.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

External Websites: The information and analysis provided through hyperlinks to third-party websites, while believed to be accurate, cannot be guaranteed by SoFi. Links are provided for informational purposes and should not be viewed as an endorsement.

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I Make $40,000 a Year, How Much House Can I Afford?

On a salary of $40,000 per year, you can afford a house priced at around $100,000-$110,000, assuming you have some money — say, $10,000 or $15,000 — for a down payment and are not already carrying debt, such as a car loan or student loan. The number can change quite a bit when you factor in your specific numbers:

•   Your debt

•   Your down payment

•   Your taxes, insurance (and homeowners association dues, if applicable)

•   Your interest rate

•   Your loan type

•   Your lender

Understanding how these factors play into home affordability can get you closer to finding a home you can afford on your $40,000 salary.

What Kind of House Can I Afford With $40K a Year?

On a $40,000 salary, you want to get the nicest home you can. But what amount of home mortgage loan you qualify for depends on a number of factors, including your debt, income, interest rate, down payment, type of loan, and lender.

Understanding Debt-to-income Ratio

You may have heard that debt can seriously derail your plan to buy a house, but you might not know exactly how it does that. Here’s the scoop: A potential lender will calculate your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio by adding all your monthly debts and dividing that number by your monthly income.

Your DTI ratio determines how much home you can afford. If you have more debt, you can’t afford a bigger monthly housing payment, which means you’ll qualify for a smaller home loan. For example, if your total debt amounts are $3,000 each month and your income is $6,000 per month, your debt-to-income ratio would be 50%. This is well above the 36% guideline many mortgage lenders want to see.


💡 Quick Tip: To see a house in person, particularly in a tight or expensive market, you may need to show the real estate agent proof that you’re preapproved for a mortgage. SoFi’s online application makes the process simple.

First-time homebuyers can
prequalify for a SoFi mortgage loan,
with as little as 3% down.


How to Factor in Your Down Payment

A down payment can also drastically impact home affordability. If you have a larger down payment, you’ll be able to afford a higher-priced home. With a down payment of 20% or more, you’ll be able to avoid the added expense of private mortgage insurance (PMI), which will in turn increase the loan amount you’ll be able to qualify for.

Try using a mortgage calculator to see how different down payment amount can affect how much home you’ll be able to qualify for.

Factors That Affect Home Affordability

To complete the picture of home affordability, you’ll also need to consider these factors:

•   Interest rates A higher interest rate means you’ll qualify for a smaller home purchase price. A lower interest rate increases how much home you’ll be able to afford.

•   Credit history and score You’ll also see that your credit score directly affects home affordability. With a good credit score, you’ll qualify for a better rate, which means you’ll qualify for a higher mortgage.

•   Taxes and insurance Higher taxes and insurance can also affect home affordability. Your lender has to take into account how much you’ll be paying in taxes and insurance and include it as part of your monthly payment.

•   Loan type Different loan types have different interest rates, down payment options, and credit requirements, which can affect home affordability.

•   Lender Your lender may be able to approve you at a higher DTI ratio — some lenders will allow the DTI to be as much as 50%.

•   Area The cost of living in your state is a top factor in determining home affordability. Price varies greatly around the country, so you may want to consider the best affordable places to live in the U.S. if you’re open to moving.

How to Afford More House With Down Payment Assistance

If you make $40,000, how much house you can afford also depends on what programs you’re able to qualify for. Down payment assistance programs can help with home affordability. These programs offer a grant or a second mortgage to cover a down payment. These programs are often offered by the state or city you live in. They may be restricted to first-time homebuyers or low-income borrowers, but these programs are worth looking into. Examples include Washington state’s Home Advantage DPA and Virginia’s HOMEownership DPA. Look for programs in your state, county, and city. You may also want to read tips to qualify for a mortgage.


💡 Quick Tip: Backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), FHA loans provide those with a fair credit score the opportunity to buy a home. They’re a great option for first-time homebuyers.1

How to Calculate How Much House You Can Afford

There are some guidelines lenders use to qualify borrowers for a mortgage. Knowing how home affordability is calculated can help you understand what income you need to make and what debts you need to pay off to qualify for a mortgage. Lenders often follow the 28/36 rule, looking for a housing payment less than 28% of a borrower’s income and total debt payments less than 36% of your income. Here’s how to calculate it.

Back-end ratio (36%): The back-end ratio is your debt-to-income ratio. Add together all of your debts (including the new mortgage payment) to make sure all debts are under 36% of your income. If your monthly income is $3,333 ($40,000/12 = $3,333), your debts (including the mortgage payment) should be no more than $1,200 ($3,333*.36).

Front-end ratio (28%): With a monthly income of $3,333, this number works out to $933.

The 35/45 Rule: It’s possible to qualify for a larger mortgage based on the 35/45 guideline, which is used at the discretion of your lender. With a monthly income of $3,333, the housing allowance (35% of your income) increases to $1,167 and the total monthly debts (45% of your income) increases to $1,500.

An easy way to calculate how much home you can afford is with a home affordability calculator.

Home Affordability Examples

For homebuyers with a $40,000 annual income (a $3,333 monthly income), traditional guidelines of a 36% debt-to-income ratio give a maximum house payment of $1,200 ($3,333 * .36). Each example has the same amount for taxes ($2,500), insurance ($1,000), and APR (6%) for a 30-year loan term.

Example #1: Too much debt

Monthly credit card debt: $100
Monthly car payment: $300
Student loan payment: $300
Total debt = $700 total debt payments

Down payment = $20,000
Maximum DTI ratio = $3,333 * .36 = $1,200
Maximum mortgage payment = $500 ($1,200 – $700)

Home budget = $54,748

Example #2: Low-debt borrower

Monthly credit card debt: $0
Monthly car payment: $100
Student loan payment: $0
Total debt = $100

Down payment: $20,000
Maximum DTI ratio = $3,333 * .36 = $1,200
Maximum mortgage payment = $1,100 ($1,200 – $100)

Home budget = $141,791

How Your Monthly Payment Affects Your Price Range

As shown above, your monthly debt obligations affect how much house you can afford. With a lot of debt, it’s hard to make a mortgage payment that qualifies you for the home you want.

It’s also important to keep in mind how interest rates affect your monthly payment. By paying so much interest over the course of 30 years, even small fluctuations in interest rates will affect your monthly payment. That’s why you see your neighbors scrambling to refinance their mortgages when interest rates drop.

Recommended: Home Loan Help Center

Types of Home Loans Available to $40K Households

There are different types of mortgage loans available for households in the $40K range:

•   FHA loans: With Federal Housing Administration loans, you don’t have to have perfect credit or a large down payment to qualify. In fact, you can apply for a FHA loan with a credit score as low as 500.

•   USDA loans: If you live in a rural area, you’ll definitely want to look at United States Department of Agriculture loans. You may be able to qualify for a USDA mortgage with no down payment and competitive interest rates.

•   Conventional loans: For borrowers with stronger financials, conventional loans are some of the least expensive mortgages in terms of interest rates, mortgage insurance premiums, and property requirements. They’re backed by the federal government, and if you’re able to qualify for a conventional mortgage, it could save you some money.

•   VA loans: For qualified veterans and servicemembers, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs loan is quite possibly the best out there. There are zero down payment options with great interest rates. If your credit is hurting, you still might be able to get a loan since the VA doesn’t have minimum credit score requirements (though the individual lender may).

The Takeaway

With proper planning, a salary of $40K should be able to get you into a home in many U.S. markets. However, you’ll want to make sure you keep a close eye on your credit score and save up for a down payment or find programs to help with one. Over time, the small, determined steps you take will lead you to your goals.

Looking for an affordable option for a home mortgage loan? SoFi can help: We offer low down payments (as little as 3% - 5%*) with our competitive and flexible home mortgage loans. Plus, applying is extra convenient: It's online, with access to one-on-one help.

SoFi Mortgages: simple, smart, and so affordable.

FAQ

Is $40K a good salary for a single person?

You work hard for your salary, and a $40,000 salary for a single person is a good start, though it is below the median income for a single person, which is $56,929, according to data from the U.S. Census.

What is a comfortable income for a single person?

Comfortable depends on the cost of living where you live and your personal needs, but it can range from around $45,000 per year in Mississippi to $112,000 in Hawaii.

What is a liveable wage in 2024?

Your liveable wage depends on your area, working household members, and children. For example, it can range from $15.89 per hour for a single living in Beaumont, Texas, to $44.99 per hour for a household with three children in St. George, Utah.

What salary is considered rich for a single person?

A salary of $234,342 would put you in the top 5% of all earners in the U.S.


Photo credit: iStock/stevecoleimages

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


SoFi Mortgages
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. Not all products are available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.


*SoFi requires Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) for conforming home loans with a loan-to-value (LTV) ratio greater than 80%. As little as 3% down payments are for qualifying first-time homebuyers only. 5% minimum applies to other borrowers. Other loan types may require different fees or insurance (e.g., VA funding fee, FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums, etc.). Loan requirements may vary depending on your down payment amount, and minimum down payment varies by loan type.

Veterans, Service members, and members of the National Guard or Reserve may be eligible for a loan guaranteed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. VA loans are subject to unique terms and conditions established by VA and SoFi. Ask your SoFi loan officer for details about eligibility, documentation, and other requirements. VA loans typically require a one-time funding fee except as may be exempted by VA guidelines. The fee may be financed or paid at closing. The amount of the fee depends on the type of loan, the total amount of the loan, and, depending on loan type, prior use of VA eligibility and down payment amount. The VA funding fee is typically non-refundable. SoFi is not affiliated with any government agency.
¹FHA loans are subject to unique terms and conditions established by FHA and SoFi. Ask your SoFi loan officer for details about eligibility, documentation, and other requirements. FHA loans require an Upfront Mortgage Insurance Premium (UFMIP), which may be financed or paid at closing, in addition to monthly Mortgage Insurance Premiums (MIP). Maximum loan amounts vary by county. The minimum FHA mortgage down payment is 3.5% for those who qualify financially for a primary purchase. SoFi is not affiliated with any government agency.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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I Make $45,000 a Year, How Much House Can I Afford?

On a salary of $45,000 per year, you can afford a house priced at around $120,000 with a monthly payment of $1,050 for a conventional home loan — that is, if you have no debt and can make a down payment. This number assumes a 6% interest rate.

These numbers change—sometimes dramatically—depending on a few factors, including:

•   How much debt you have

•   What your down payment is

•   How much you’re paying for taxes, insurance, and homeowners association dues, if anything

•   What interest rate is available to you

•   What type of loan you get

With the median home price in the U.S. topping $400,000, you might be wondering how everyone else affords a home in your neighborhood. We’ll cover every aspect of home affordability for a $45,000 salary to help you work toward getting the home you’ve always wanted.


💡 Quick Tip: A VA loan can make home buying simple for qualified borrowers. Because the VA guarantees a portion of the loan, you could skip a down payment. Plus, you could qualify for lower interest rates, enjoy lower closing costs, and even bypass mortgage insurance.†

What Kind of House Can I Afford With $45K a Year?

The kind of home you can afford depends on more than your $45,000 salary. It’s also based on your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio, interest rate, down payment, type of home loan, and lender.

First-time homebuyers can
prequalify for a SoFi mortgage loan,
with as little as 3% down.


Understanding Debt-to-income Ratio

Your DTI ratio is a key factor in determining how much home you can afford. The more debt you have, the lower your housing payment needs to be. This directly translates into a lower priced home. So, what exactly is a DTI ratio? It is the proportion of monthly debt you need to repay in relation to your gross monthly income.

For example, if your total debt amounts are $2,000 each month and your income is $6,000 per month, your debt-to-income ratio would be 33%. This falls under the 36% threshold mortgage lenders look for with conventional home mortgage loans.

However, keep in mind that the $2,000 has to include your new mortgage payment. If your debts cost $500 each month, your monthly mortgage payment cannot be more than $1,500.

How to Factor in Your Down Payment

Your down payment also plays a significant factor in home affordability. Generally, the higher down payment you have, the more home you can afford. If you purchase a home far below what you can afford, your monthly payment will be much lower.

If you make a down payment of 20% or more, you’ll also be able to save on mortgage insurance premiums, which are typically required on most loan types for homes purchased with a down payment lower than 20%.

If you play around with a mortgage calculator, you can see how a larger down payment can affect your monthly payment and home price.

Factors That Affect Home Affordability

Beyond your debt, income, and down payment, there are a number of other factors that go into home affordability. These include:

•   Interest rates The interest rate you have on your home dramatically impacts how much home you can afford. When interest rates are high, your monthly payment is higher. When interest rates are down, you pay less interest on your loan, which means you can afford a more costly home. Remember that if rates drop significantly a mortgage refinance is always an option.

•   Credit history and score The interest rate that you’ll qualify for is dependent on your credit score and history. A better credit score will qualify you for the best interest rates, which means your monthly payment will be lower, which can increase your buying power.

•   Taxes and insurance Taxes and insurance factor into your home’s monthly payment. They will be calculated into the home’s PITI (payment, interest, taxes, insurance) and included as part of your monthly debts.

•   Loan type The type of loan you get affects home affordability. This is due to the different interest rates and down payment options available to specific loan types. VA loans from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, for example, come with a lower interest rate and don’t require a down payment.

•   Lender Lenders may have discretion to increase the allowable debt-to-income ratio. Some can go as high as 50%.

•   Location Some areas are more affordable than others. Thinking about moving? Take a look at a list of the best affordable places to live in the U.S.

Recommended: The Cost of Living By State

How to Afford More House With Down Payment Assistance

One of the best tools for increasing home affordability is with down payment assistance programs. These programs provide funds for the down payment (and sometimes closing costs) to help make homes more affordable for buyers.

Some programs offer down payment assistance in the form of a grant that does not need to be repaid, while others finance a second mortgage which may need to be paid when the home is sold (but sometimes is forgiven earlier). In Colorado, for example, there’s the CHFA Colorado Down Payment Assistance Grant. Virginia offers the Virginia HOMEownership Down Payment and Closing Cost Assistance program (DPA)

Search your state, county, and city to see what programs are offered for your area. You may also want to read tips to qualify for a mortgage.

How to Calculate How Much House You Can Afford

Calculating how much house you can afford is smart, especially if you’re a first-time homebuyer and making early plans to buy a home. There are some guidelines lenders use to qualify borrowers for a mortgage, including:

The 28/36 Rule: This guideline states that no more than 28% of your income should go to your monthly housing payment and your debt-to-income ratio should be no more than 36% of your income

When calculating DTI (also known as the back-end ratio), your lender will add all of your debts (including the new mortgage payment) to make sure all debts will fall under 36% of your income amount. If your monthly income is $3,750 ($45,000/12 = $3,750), your debts (including the mortgage payment) should be no more than $1,350 ($3,750*.36).

Lenders will also calculate the front-end ratio, which should be no more than 28% or your income. With a monthly income of $3,750, this number works out to $1,050.

The 35/45 Rule: Some lenders may go by the 35/45 guideline, which allows for a housing payment up to 35% of income and 45% of total DTI ratio. This expanded allowance is up to the lender, but may allow for qualification of higher purchase amount and payment.

With a monthly income of $3,750, the housing allowance (35% of your income) increases to $1,312.50 and the total monthly debts (45% of your income) increases to $1,687.50. An easier way to calculate how much home you can afford is with a home affordability calculator.

Home Affordability Examples

Let’s take a look at two examples of homebuyers with $45,000 incomes in differing scenarios. All assume the same taxes ($2,500), insurance ($1,000), and APR (6%) for a 30-year loan term (just for illustrative purposes).

The $45,000 annual salary is divided by 12 to get a $3,750 monthly income and the maximum DTI ratio works out to be $1,350 ($3,750 * .36).

Example #1: $45,000 income but lots of debt
Monthly credit card debt: $300
Monthly car payment: $350
Student loan payment: $300
Total debt = $950 total debt payments

Down payment = $20,000
Maximum DTI ratio = $3,750 * .36 = $1,350
Maximum mortgage payment = $400 ($1,350 – $950)

Home budget = $38,069

Even with a $20,000 down payment, it could be hard to buy a home in this scenario.

Example #2: $45,000 income with little debt
Monthly credit card debt: $50
Monthly car payment: $0
Student loan payment: $0
Total debt = $50

Down payment: $20,000
Maximum DTI ratio = $3,750 * .36 = $1,350
Maximum mortgage payment = $1,300 ($1,350 – $50)

Home budget = $171,925



💡 Quick Tip: Don’t have a lot of cash on hand for a down payment? The minimum down payment for an FHA mortgage loan is as low as 3.5%.1

How Your Monthly Payment Affects Your Price Range

The monthly payment you qualify for affects the total price you can pay for a home. If monthly debts are too high, for example, you’ll likely qualify for a lower-priced home. The monthly payment is also affected by interest rates. Because interest is amortized over 30 years (on a 30-year mortgage), the amount of interest you pay is significant, even if you manage to score a lower rate.

Recommended: Home Loan Help Center

Types of Home Loans Available to $45K Households

When you’re looking for home loans, you’ll see these different types of mortgage loans available:

•   FHA loans Loans backed by the Federal Housing Administration are geared toward buyers with low down payments, low credit scores, and other situations that require a lender to be more flexible.

•   USDA loans United States Department of Agriculture loans are for those who live in rural areas. They offer zero down payment options and low interest rates.

•   Conventional loans Conventional loans are loans that are not part of a government program, but they are backed by government-sponsored enterprises, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. They’re usually less expensive than FHA loans, but your application does need to meet certain guidelines to qualify for conventional financing.

•   VA loans VA loans offer zero down payment options, the lowest interest rates on the market, and flexible credit requirements. If you qualify for a VA loan, you’ll likely want to go with this option.

The Takeaway

There’s no way around it — affording a home in today’s housing market is tough. If your $45,000 salary is all you have access to, you’ll need to save, improve your credit, research down payment assistance programs, enlist a partner, move to a less expensive area, or find other creative ways to afford a home. But don’t give up. It can be done. Your hard work will pay off with a mortgage for a home of your own soon.

Looking for an affordable option for a home mortgage loan? SoFi can help: We offer low down payments (as little as 3% - 5%*) with our competitive and flexible home mortgage loans. Plus, applying is extra convenient: It's online, with access to one-on-one help.

SoFi Mortgages: simple, smart, and so affordable.

FAQ

Is $45K a good salary for a single person?

A $45,000 salary for a single person is a good start. How good it feels to earn $45,000 will depend on the cost of living where you live and the friends and neighbors you’re surrounded by.

What is a comfortable income for a single person?

A comfortable income for a single person depends on your lifestyle and habits. The median income for a single person is $56,929, according to data from the U.S. Census. A single person in Cobb County, Georgia, would be able to cover their expenses for about $40,000 per year while the same person in New York City would need $53,342.

What is a liveable wage in 2023?

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Living Wage Calculator takes into account your area, working household members, and number of children. For example, a single living in San Francisco has a living wage of $26.63. A household with three children where only one spouse works in St. George, Utah has a living wage of $44.99 per hour.

What salary is considered rich for a single person?

To be in the top 5% of earners, you would need a salary north of $234,342.


Photo credit: iStock/500

SoFi Loan Products
SoFi loans are originated by SoFi Bank, N.A., NMLS #696891 (Member FDIC). For additional product-specific legal and licensing information, see SoFi.com/legal. Equal Housing Lender.


SoFi Mortgages
Terms, conditions, and state restrictions apply. Not all products are available in all states. See SoFi.com/eligibility for more information.


*SoFi requires Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) for conforming home loans with a loan-to-value (LTV) ratio greater than 80%. As little as 3% down payments are for qualifying first-time homebuyers only. 5% minimum applies to other borrowers. Other loan types may require different fees or insurance (e.g., VA funding fee, FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums, etc.). Loan requirements may vary depending on your down payment amount, and minimum down payment varies by loan type.

¹FHA loans are subject to unique terms and conditions established by FHA and SoFi. Ask your SoFi loan officer for details about eligibility, documentation, and other requirements. FHA loans require an Upfront Mortgage Insurance Premium (UFMIP), which may be financed or paid at closing, in addition to monthly Mortgage Insurance Premiums (MIP). Maximum loan amounts vary by county. The minimum FHA mortgage down payment is 3.5% for those who qualify financially for a primary purchase. SoFi is not affiliated with any government agency.
Veterans, Service members, and members of the National Guard or Reserve may be eligible for a loan guaranteed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. VA loans are subject to unique terms and conditions established by VA and SoFi. Ask your SoFi loan officer for details about eligibility, documentation, and other requirements. VA loans typically require a one-time funding fee except as may be exempted by VA guidelines. The fee may be financed or paid at closing. The amount of the fee depends on the type of loan, the total amount of the loan, and, depending on loan type, prior use of VA eligibility and down payment amount. The VA funding fee is typically non-refundable. SoFi is not affiliated with any government agency.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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