Can I Open a Bank Account for Someone Else?

Can I Open a Bank Account for Someone Else?

Yes, you can open a bank account for someone else, but there’s an important condition. To do so, you either need to also be an account holder or have a certain form of access. For instance, you can likely open an account for your kid, your spouse, or someone who has deemed you their power of attorney. In most cases, that other party will need to be present and participate in the account opening process.

Here’s what you need to know about the ins and outs of the process.

Key Points

•   Opening a bank account for someone else is permissible under specific conditions such as joint ownership or having power of attorney.

•   Minors cannot legally open bank accounts; however, an adult can open a custodial or joint account for them.

•   For joint accounts, both parties typically need to be present during the account opening and provide valid identification.

•   Power of attorney allows an individual to manage another’s bank account, requiring legal documentation and identification during the account setup.

•   The process involves providing proof of identity, filling out an application with personal information, and possibly making an initial deposit.

How Do Bank Accounts Work?

Bank accounts act as a vessel to park and often use your money. Typically, banks, credit unions, and other financial institutions offer several different types of accounts. Each works in its own way. Some standard offerings include:

•   Checking accounts. A checking account allows the account holder to deposit funds and use the money to pay bills, write checks, or shop with a debit card. While some accounts earn interest, it may only be a tiny percentage.

•   Savings accounts. Unlike checking accounts, savings accounts are designed to hold and grow your money for an extended period. You can then use this money in the future or keep it as a rainy day fund. Savings accounts typically earn interest. Federal law may restrict the number of withdrawals you can take out of a savings account; check with your financial institution for details.

•   Money market accounts. Similar to savings accounts, money market accounts earn interest. Some money market accounts may have a debit card and check-writing features. Also, the number of withdrawals you can make from this type of account may be restricted.


💡 Quick Tip: Don’t think too hard about your money. Automate your budgeting, saving, and spending with SoFi’s seamless and secure online banking features.

Is It Possible to Open a Bank Account for Someone Else?

Now, for the question “Can I open a bank account for someone else?” There are three circumstances in which banks allow you to open an account for someone else. Either you’re opening the account for a minor, a joint account holder, or you hold power of attorney for another individual. Here’s a bit more detail on each of these situations.

•   Bank account for a minor. Minors cannot open a bank account according to federal law. Therefore, if you want to begin teaching your kids the concept of saving early on, you can open an account for a child. You do so by opening a custodial account or joint account. With a custodial account, the child owns the funds within the account, but the parent manages them until the child reaches the age of maturity, which is usually 18 years old. With a joint account, you and your child both have access to the account. As the parent, though, you can monitor the activity within the account, like setting withdrawal limits.

•   Bank account for a co-owner. Your other option is to become a joint or co-owner of a bank account. When you set up a joint bank account, you and the other co-owner have access to the funds. In many cases, you will be able to make deposits and withdrawals at your discretion; in others, you will need the other account holder’s approval to conduct transactions.

Usually, you open a joint account with someone you have already established a financial relationship with, like a spouse or other family member. Once you open the account, you can go about managing the joint bank account together.

•   Power of attorney. When someone gives you a power of attorney, you can manage their bank accounts on their behalf. However, you must keep your own money separate from their accounts. When opening the account, the bank usually requires a legal power of attorney document and a photo ID. You may also need to fill out the bank’s power of attorney form. Also, the account will usually be in the other party’s name, but you will have authority over the account.

Get up to $300 when you bank with SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings Account with direct deposit and get up to a $300 cash bonus. Plus, get up to 4.60% APY on your cash!


Steps to Open a Bank Account for Someone Else

There are typical steps for opening a bank account, though every bank, credit union, or other financial institution may have a slightly different process. Although the details may vary, here are some common steps you will usually take when opening a new bank account for someone else.

Valid Proof of Identity

The first step to opening a bank account for someone else is to provide a valid proof of identification. When you’re opening an account for a minor, you and your child must be present during the account opening process. You and your child will also have to provide a form of identification such as:

•   U.S. driver’s license

•   Social Security card or ITIN

•   Birth certificate

•   Immunization record

•   School photo ID

•   Passport/alien ID.

When you’re opening an account with someone else who is not a minor, both parties usually must be present to open the account. Also, you will have to provide the same forms of identification. Some common forms of identification include:

•   U.S. driver’s license

•   U.S. state ID

•   Passport.

If you’re a power of attorney for someone else, you will also need to bring your notarized power of attorney legal document. Depending on the bank, they may also require you to fill out a power of attorney form to accompany the rest of the documentation.

Basic Information

In addition to showing valid proof of identification, you will likely need to fill out an application. On the application, the bank will request personal information from each account holder. This information can include:

•   Social Security number or Tax ID (for business accounts)

•   Utility bill to verify current address

•   Name

•   Address

•   Phone number.

Initial Deposit

Some banks may also require an initial minimum deposit or a monthly minimum balance to keep the account active. Typically, banks require between $25 and $100 to open an account. However, some institutions may have no deposit requirement. It’s a good idea to know upfront if you’ll need to deposit funds to activate your account.

Recommended: What Is a High-Yield Savings Account?

Things to Consider When Opening a Bank Account for Someone Else

Opening a bank account for someone else may involve a family member. In these cases, you probably feel pretty sure the other party is trustworthy.

But what about opening an account for someone else who is a friend or distant relative? Consider these points before you open a bank account for someone else.

•   Limited privacy. When you combine your finances with another individual, you forgo your privacy when managing your money individually. For example, the other account holder can see all of the transactions within the account and know how you spend your money. So, if this raises some concerns, you may want to reconsider.

•   Shared financial responsibilities. Opening an account with someone else means you may now need to share financial responsibilities such as paying bills or saving for joint retirement (as well as any account fees). If the contributions or withdrawals are uneven, this financial partnership could be harmful, so discuss each party’s contributions and expectations for managing the account.

•   Use multiple accounts. If the idea of merging financial lives doesn’t suit you, you might want to continue managing your money separately and use the joint account for a few shared expenses. This way, you can keep your privacy while managing your money with someone else.

Recommended: How to Achieve Financial Minimalism

The Takeaway

Yes, you can open a bank account for someone else. However, they will usually have to be aware and participate in the account opening process. But, before you open an account on someone else’s behalf, make sure you understand the financial implication of this decision, such as forgoing your privacy. While the process is fairly straightforward, you do want to be sure the parties involved understand the ground rules and are comfortable with the shared access and responsibility.

Whichever path you take (shared or separate accounts), you can find banking options with SoFi.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.


Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

Can I open a bank account on behalf of someone else?

Yes, you can typically open an account for a minor or joint account holder. However, both parties will need to be present to open the account. It’s also possible to open an account on behalf of someone else if you’re their power of attorney.

What do I need when opening a bank account for someone else?

When opening a bank account for someone else, you and the other party must usually be present. You and the other applicant will also need to provide valid proof of identification, as well as personal information like your Social Security number and address.

Can I open a bank account for a younger sibling?

Yes, you can open a bank account for younger siblings as long as they are over 18 years old and participate in the opening process. If they are under 18, they may need a parent or legal guardian to open the account with them instead.


Photo credit: iStock/kate_sept2004

SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Do Banks Run Credit Checks for a Checking Account?

Do Banks Run Credit Checks for a Checking Account?

If you’re wondering whether a bank checks your credit when you open a checking account, the answer is typically no…but there’s more to the story than that one little word.

When it comes to starting a new checking account, banks don’t usually check your three-digit FICO® score — the most common score used by lenders — in order to determine your eligibility to open a checking account. They do, however, often look into your banking history via an agency known as ChexSystems.

Here’s a closer look at credit checks when opening an account and what could prevent you from getting that approval you’re after.

Key Points

•   Banks typically do not check your FICO score when you open a checking account.

•   Instead, they may review your banking history through ChexSystems, which records banking behaviors like overdrafts.

•   A negative ChexSystems report can prevent you from opening a bank account.

•   Opening a checking account does not affect your credit score as it does not involve a hard credit inquiry.

•   Some banks offer accounts without consulting ChexSystems, allowing more people to open accounts despite past banking issues.

Whether or Not Banks Run Credit Checks for Checking Accounts

First, know that when most entities check your credit, they’re looking at that three-digit FICO score mentioned above — the one that ranges from 300 (poor) to 850 (exceptional). They will likely also receive your entire credit report, which is a detailed document listing all your open accounts, their statuses, and several years of your credit behavior, among other items.

When your credit is checked, it can be either a soft or hard credit inquiry. The former are inquiries that don’t impact your precious credit score. But the latter can wind up lowering your score because these “hard pulls,” as they are sometimes known, can indicate that you are shopping around for more credit, which can make you look like a risky prospect.

But back to our question about whether a bank will initiate a credit check…the answer is: not exactly. They typically use their own kind of financial background check system called ChexSystems. It’s a reporting agency that focuses on consumers’ banking behavior.

💡 Quick Tip: Don’t think too hard about your money. Automate your budgeting, saving, and spending with SoFi’s seamless and secure online banking features.

What Is ChexSystems?

ChexSystems is a reporting agency that focuses on your behavior around banking. Some details to note:

•   Your ChexSystems report will include your history of overdrafts, negative balances, and bounced checks, as well as any instances of fraud, security freezes, and other items specifically to do with your banking history. So while it’s not a credit check, per se, it is like a credit check, and your report could lead to your being rejected for a bank account.

•   Like any other reporting agency, ChexSystems is required by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) to issue consumers a free report once a year, so you can regularly check your history.

•   If any of the negative items on your report are fraudulent, you can dispute that information with the agency to get it removed — and if they’re legitimate, you can work toward improving the behavior that caused them. (Most information on your ChexSystems report falls off after five years.)

•   There are also deposit accounts that don’t pull ChexSystems reports. So even if you’ve got some negative history, it’s possible to turn over a new leaf and work toward a more positive relationship with banking.

Recommended: How to Avoid ATM Fees

Why Do Banks Run Credit Checks When You Open a Bank Account?

Now that you know how credit checks work, you may wonder, Why do banks run credit checks when you want to open an account? Isn’t that their whole reason for being, to give people checking and savings accounts?

While there’s truth to that, banks do rely on their customers to keep their accounts in good order — and to pay fees, ensure checks don’t bounce, and generally be responsible bankers.

Using ChexSystems gives banks an idea of how you might behave as a banking customer in the future based on your recorded behavior. The intel in ChexSystems can also help a bank disqualify you from obtaining an account if they don’t think you pass muster.

Get up to $300 when you bank with SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings Account with direct deposit and get up to a $300 cash bonus. Plus, get up to 4.60% APY on your cash!


Does It Hurt Your Credit Score When Trying to Open a Bank Account?

One exciting corollary to the fact that banks don’t pull your credit score when opening an account: Opening a bank account won’t hurt your credit score, since there’s no hard credit inquiry involved. That’s comforting news to anyone opening a new bank account. It also means you can even open a few different checking and savings accounts (perhaps you want a regular checking account, plus one for your side hustle income, as well as a savings account for your emergency fund), and you won’t negatively impact your rating.

Stressed about your credit score and not loving where it’s lingering? Building your credit score is definitely an important step toward plenty of financial goals, and the behaviors you cultivate to do so may also improve your ChexSystems report. Moves like lowering the amount of debt you carry, paying bills on time all the time, and not opening too many lines of credit can really pay off.

Reasons Why You Might Be Denied a Checking Account

Unfortunately, every now and then, people do get rejected when they apply for a bank account. For banks that use ChexSystems, these are some of the reasons for a denial.

Unpaid Negative Balance on a Previous Bank Account

As mentioned, banks aren’t officially loaning money to checking account holders — but if you maintain a negative balance on an account and never pay that money back, the financial institution is on the hook for that loss. For this reason, negative balances on existing or previous accounts can spell rejection for a new one.

Abusing Overdraft Privileges

On a similar note, overdrafting again and again hinders a bank’s ability to stay in the black on your account. That goes double if you’ve avoided paying overdraft fees or other charges associated with your behavior.

Fraudulent Activity on Previous Accounts

ChexSystems records suspected fraudulent activity — which, obviously, is not something a bank wants to have to deal with in the future.

Having a Joint Account With Someone Who Has Negative Unpaid Balances on Their Accounts

When you have a joint bank account, your partner’s behaviors can affect your standing as much as your own. So even if it’s not you who’s wreaking havoc on your bank account, the other person’s negative balances, overdraft abuses, and fraudulent activity could negatively impact your ChexSystems report.

The Takeaway

If you’re sweating whether opening a bank account can involve a credit check that deflates your credit score, don’t worry. Most banks don’t pull a hard credit check to qualify you for a checking account. However, they might look into your ChexSystems report, a banking industry way of peering into an applicant’s history. Certain negative items can disqualify you from opening a bank account.

That said, there are banks out there that don’t use ChexSystems to qualify their customers, and SoFi is one of them.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.


Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

Do banks check your credit score when opening a checking account?

While banks don’t check your FICO score to qualify you for a checking account, they may check your ChexSystems report. This is similar to your credit report but focused specifically on your banking history.

Can you be denied a checking account because of bad credit?

You likely won’t be denied a checking account because of bad credit directly. However, if you have bad credit, you may also have negative items on your ChexSystems report that could disqualify you from some (but not all) bank accounts.

Why would a bank deny a checking account?

A bank might deny your request for an account if you have negative items on your ChexSystems report, such as fraudulent activity, negative balances, or unpaid overdraft charges.


Photo credit: iStock/MicroStockHub

SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Disclaimer: Many factors affect your credit scores and the interest rates you may receive. SoFi is not a Credit Repair Organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. SoFi does not provide “credit repair” services or advice or assistance regarding “rebuilding” or “improving” your credit record, credit history, or credit rating. For details, see the FTC’s website .

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

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hands holding cash

How to Grocery Shop on a Budget: 31 Tips

It’s not your imagination: Grocery prices are rising, having gone up 2.2% between February 2023 and 2024, after the sticker shock of an 11% increase between 2021 and 2022.

You may think there’s not much you can do about the high cost of groceries (after all, a person has to eat!), but there are many easy ways to slash your weekly spending on groceries. And, saving at the supermarket doesn’t have to mean skimping on quality, taste, or nutrition.

What follows are 31 simple tricks that can help you shop smarter and spend less whenever you visit the supermarket.

Key Points

•   Grocery prices have increased significantly, prompting the need for budget-conscious shopping strategies.

•   Planning meals, understanding pricing, and avoiding shopping when hungry are key to saving on groceries.

•   Buying in bulk, choosing generic products, and shopping in season can reduce costs.

•   Making a shopping list and sticking to it helps avoid impulse purchases and manage spending.

•   Utilizing online grocery shopping can prevent off-script purchases and facilitate price comparison.

Key Principles Behind Saving Money on Groceries

Before diving into the ideas for saving money on groceries, consider the big-picture principles at work when it comes to frugal living for food. Consider these concepts:

•   Plan your meals

•   Understand pricing

•   Don’t shop when hungry

•   Buy in bulk when possible

•   Choose generic products

•   Shop in season

•   Comparison-shop like a pro; no grabbing the first item you see

•   Stick to your list

•   Buy local or grow your own food.

💡 Quick Tip: Help your money earn more money! Opening a bank account online often gets you higher-than-average rates.

How Much Do Groceries Cost on Average?

The average household spends about $270 a week on groceries; those with kids spend more, or about $331 per week. Using Census Bureau data, the average monthly costs for groceries therefore tops $1,000.

These costs are strictly for groceries. If you eat out or grab takeout (whether a flat white or fancy salad), your total food costs will of course be higher.

How Can I Determine What My Budget Is?

It’s important to set aside an amount of money for food that fits into your overall financial planning. In terms of how to make a budget, you might try the popular 50/30/20 budget rule. With this plan, you take your after-tax income and allocate 50% to needs, such as housing, utilities, health care, minimum debt repayment, basic transportation, and food. Thirty percent is for the “wants” in life, such as travel, dining out, and cute (but not vital) clothes. The last 20% goes to savings and additional debt payment.

If you use this budget or another method, you will want to make sure that your food costs fall in line with the other necessities of life, perhaps trimming from your spending on “wants,” if needed.

Tips for Grocery Shopping on a Budget

Now, dive in and learn how to trim your grocery bill and live on a budget.

1. Make – and Stick to – a List

Impulse buys can quickly bust your budget. So before going to the supermarket it can be wise to plan out your meals and make a detailed list of all the things you will need, including any household supplies.

At the store, you’ll want to be strict about sticking to the list. Yes, those pineapples look great and they’re on sale, but are they on your list? No? Then you should probably keep walking. Otherwise, you may well wind up blowing your budget.

Shopping with a list not only helps save money but can also cut down on food waste — the items that tend to sit idle in the fridge or on the countertop are often the ones that never had an assigned meal to begin with.

2. Eat Before You Shop

If you enter a supermarket hungry, there’s no telling what you’ll end up putting into your cart because, since just about everything is going to look good. Some popcorn? Why not? Pomegranate juice? It’s healthy, so into the cart it goes. And maybe some cookies as a little treat.

Walk into the grocery store with a full stomach, on the other hand, and you might be shocked by how much lower your grocery bill is.

3. Plan for Leftovers

In America, 80 million tons of food go to waste every year. One reason that food goes to waste is that it can be difficult to buy the exact amount of food you need to make the meals we’ve planned. This can result in leftover ingredients languishing in the fridge or pantry, and then landing in the trash can.

You can help reduce wasted food (and money) by doubling your recipe and then having leftovers for lunch and/or putting some in the freezer so you’ll have a meal at the ready when you need it.

Recommended: How Much Should I Spend on Groceries a Month?

4. Grocery-Shop Online

Think you’ll be tempted to go off-script if you enter a grocery store? You might want to try online grocery shopping instead. Many local supermarkets offer online ordering, and allow you to choose either curbside pick-up or delivery.

Or, you may want to try one of the many online grocery services, such as Instacart or Amazon Fresh. You can often choose one-off delivery, as well as recurring delivery of staples (like toilet paper) so you never run out.

It can be easier to avoid the temptations when you can type everything you need into a search bar. Plus, shopping online makes it easy to compare brand prices, see what’s on sale, and watch the total tally up in real time.

5. Develop a Green Thumb

Even if you’re not much of a gardener, you might want to try growing one or two of your favorite vegetables in a container or a small garden area outdoors. You can then step outside and pick your tomato or bell pepper rather than buying them at the store.

If you don’t have any outdoor space, you might consider starting an indoor herb garden. If you have parsley, basil, or dill right on your windowsill, you can just pick what you need rather than buy a whole bunch at the market. It’s a fun and tasty way to stick to your budget.

6. Shop at Stores You Know

Having a tried-and-true grocery store may be good for your wallet. Walking into a store you’re familiar with means you already know where to get the items on your list.

Head into an unfamiliar store and you may be left wandering the aisles for what seems like an eternity trying to find your goods. That’s because grocery stores are set up to be a little confusing and to drive consumers to have to do a bit of strolling, as that’s when you’re more likely to make random purchases.

7. Bring Your Own Bags

One quick way to potentially drive down the cost of your grocery store run is to BYOB — bring your own bags. Many cities and states have imposed plastic bag bans. If you show up empty-handed, you’ll be stuck purchasing reusable bags at the checkout.

In areas where plastic bags are allowed, many stores will reward customers who bring reusable bags by reimbursing them about 5 to 10 cents a bag at checkout. BYOBing is also kinder to the environment.

Keeping some reusable bags in your car is a good way to avoid forgetting them at home.

8. Join Loyalty Programs

Many stores now offer discounts for regular shoppers and even secret sale items only for those who’ve signed up.

It’s typically quick, easy, and free to join, though some stores like Whole Foods require customers to be part of its Amazon Prime membership service (which comes with a yearly fee). Still, it may be worth it as discounts at the register can add up to real savings.

9. Embrace Meatless Mondays

Here’s another way to buy groceries on a budget: Buy and eat less meat. Reducing meat consumption and eating more plant-based meals has benefits for the environment, your waistline, and your wallet.

Chickpeas, pinto beans, peas, Brussels sprouts, quinoa, tofu, along with many other beans, whole grains, and vegetables are all excellent (and inexpensive) sources of protein without the added saturated fat that comes with animal products.

You may want to consider going meatless at least one day a week, and then building up to a few meat-free meals per week.

10. Buy Larger Containers

Buying the largest size of packaged, canned, and frozen foods can sometimes help you save money on food. That’s because some of the cost of every grocery item is in the packaging.

If your grocery store has a “bulk foods” section you might save even more by buying the amount of food you need in plastic bags.

11. Think Beyond Fresh Produce

Another way to save money at the grocery store is to buy fruits and vegetables in the frozen or canned foods aisle. The savings can add up, especially when the food is out of season.

If you’re looking to add pineapple to a recipe in the winter, for example, you can save money by opting for canned pineapple over a fresh one that’s not in season. Canned and frozen fruits and vegetables also don’t go bad as quickly as fresh, so they may be less likely to get wasted.

12. Try a CSA

A Community-Supported Agriculture (CSA) program can help you save money on fresh produce, eggs, and herbs. You can look for one using the USDA’s CSA directory and see if they’ll deliver to your front door.

Not only will you be saving money but you’ll be supporting local farmers and eating food that’s close by helps ensure it’s fresher.

13. Clip Coupons

While it’s not rocket science, this tried-and-true technique is still one of the best ways to cut your grocery bill. You may want to consider scanning the local circulars that come in the mail to see which stores are having deals on the food items you need that week. You can also look for manufacturers’ coupons (online and in circulars inserted into Sunday newspapers).

When it comes to how to coupon successfully, however, it’s wise to make sure that you’re only buying items you need and usually buy — otherwise you could end up adding to, not shrinking, your grocery bill.

💡 Quick Tip: Want a simple way to save more everyday? When you turn on Roundups, all of your debit card purchases are automatically rounded up to the next dollar and deposited into your online savings account.

14. Shop in Season

Another way to spend wisely is to cook and shop seasonally. It’s typically cheaper to buy fruits and vegetables that are in season than ones that have been shipped to the store from a far-away place where it can be grown year-round.

Also, since in-season produce is in large supply, it tends to be sold at affordable prices to maintain demand. In-season produce also tends to be tastier.

15. Use Apps

There are a number of rebate apps you can download onto your phone for free that allow you to get cashback on items you purchased. Options include Ibotta, Checkout 51, and Fetch.

While rebates don’t give you a discount upfront (like a traditional coupon), you should see savings in the long run.

If you frequently shop at large chains like Walmart or Target for groceries, getting their apps may help you earn rewards and get discounts for being a loyal shopper. You just need to scan your mobile app when you check out.

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Open a SoFi Checking and Savings Account with direct deposit and get up to a $300 cash bonus. Plus, get up to 4.60% APY on your cash!


16. Stock up on Shelf-Stable Items

When your grocery store is having a sale on canned goods, dried goods, or other pantry items, you may want to consider buying multiples. Items like beans, sauces, soups, nuts, peanut butter, pretzels, shelf-stable snacks like unpopped popcorn won’t expire for a long time.

You’ll be able to enjoy the cost savings and will likely appreciate having them on hand when preparing meals.

17. Buy Store-Brand or Generic

You don’t have to sacrifice flavor and taste in order to save money while grocery shopping. While It’s easy to overlook no-name or store brands, in many cases these items are actually made by the brand name companies, just with a different label.

And the savings can be real. Using generic (rather than brand name) products can save as much as 40% off your grocery bill. You can put that extra cash right into your bank account.

18. Shop the Outside Aisles

The inside aisles of the grocery store are where pricier processed foods are typically stocked, The outer edges, on the other hand, is where you tend to find fresh fruits and vegetables, grains and beans.

Shopping on the edge — and filling your cart with nutrient-dense items and fresh, seasonal food — can help your wallet, as well as your waistline.

Recommended: Examining the Price of Eating at Home vs Eating Out

19. Portion Food Out Yourself

It can be tempting to buy convenience items where food is pre-portioned into single servings so you can just grab-and-go. Smaller items can also help you keep from overeating. But all of that packaging tends to increase the cost of the item.

If your kids love crackers, you may want to buy a full-size box and portion them out in zip-top bags or reusable containers. You can do the same with other favorite snacks so you won’t be tempted to eat the whole bag in one sitting. You can also spoon yogurt into small containers for school lunches and cut cheese into slices from a block for easy snacks.

20. Drink Tap Water

To avoid spending money on bottled water, you may want to get a filtered pitcher and switch to drinking tap water. Depending on how much you typically sip, you can save a bundle. By drinking from a reusable water bottle or a glass throughout the day, you’ll also reduce the amount of plastic waste you’re putting into the environment.

Getting your kids used to drinking water instead of juice or soda can also reduce your supermarket bills.

21. Use a Smaller Cart

Here’s a little swap that can help you save: If you’re not shopping for a full week’s worth of groceries, consider grabbing a small cart or, even better, a hand-held basket. This will automatically limit how much you can buy because only so much will fit.

When you have a smaller cart — or a basket that will get heavy quickly — you’re forcing yourself to ask, “Do I really need this?” every time you pick up something to buy in the store.

22. Minimize Trips to the Store

One way you can save money on your grocery bill is to only shop when you need to and to minimize the frequency that you set foot in the supermarket door.

The reason is that the less often you’re physically in the store, the less likely you’ll be tempted to buy something you don’t absolutely need. It can be all too common to go to the grocery store for “one thing” and come out with a few items.

23. Shop Off-Peak

Most of us don’t want to spend our weekends grocery shopping, right? Unfortunately, Saturdays and Sundays are the days when many of us have the time to go to the supermarket — along with everyone else in our town.

Shopping during peak times can hurt your budget in a few ways. You might try to speed through the supermarket crush and be more likely to buy an item at the end of the aisle because it’s convenient, rather than grab a similar product on the shelf a few feet away. This could mean they are buying a more expensive version of what they need.

You might also run into trouble shopping during peak times because you’re more likely to get stuck in a long line — and become tempted by miscellaneous items stocked near and along the checkout line.

24. Calculate the Bill While You Shop

Shopping with a calculator or getting out your phone and adding things up as you put them in your cart can help you stick to your spending plan<. (If you’re shopping with kids, you can give them the job to tally what’s in the cart.) By keeping a running tally of how much money is in your cart, you can save yourself from any unpleasant surprises during check-out. Plus, it can make you think twice before putting any extras in your cart.

25. Shop Your Pantry First

It’s easy to accidentally buy an extra item at the supermarket that you didn’t realize you already had stored at home. That’s why after you write your grocery list, it can be a good idea to double-check pantry shelves, spice racks, the fridge, and the freezer to make sure you truly need what’s on your list.

You may even want to shop your pantry and fridge before making your meal plan and shopping list to see if you can think of meals that incorporate foods you already have on hand.

26. Pay with Cash

Another idea for grocery shopping on a budget: A simple trick for lowering your grocery bill is to set your budget and then only bring that much money in cash, leaving the plastic at home.

This will help ensure that you stick to your list and avoid grabbing any tempting extras. You can only spend what you have in your wallet. Full stop. (A variation on the theme: Use your debit card, not your credit card, to keep your spending in line.)

Recommended: Envelope Budgeting Method

27. Make Breakfast for Dinner

Eggs are one of the most affordable protein sources out there. By making simple breakfast-style food for dinner, you’re offering your family a fun meal and using up some of your (affordable) breakfast foods.

You might consider making an omelet or frittata with eggs, cheese, and leftover vegetables or creating a bacon, egg, and cheese burrito. Not only are many breakfast recipes a delicious dinner option, but they’re affordable and often quick to prepare.

28. Avoid Eye-Level Items

Grocery stores are designed to get you to spend more money, which is why the most expensive products tend to be stocked at eye level. Brands often pay more money for their products to be displayed prominently so you’re more likely to buy them.

Searching high and low when you’re shopping may help you stop spending money (or at least more than you budgeted for). Once you start looking, you may even notice a price differential between the eye-level item cost and the one at your feet.

29. Bake Your Own Treats

Many impulse buys happen in the bakery and snack sections of the supermarket. Before you succumb, you may want to ask yourself if you could bake it at home. You may already have the baking basics on your pantry shelves and could whip up some muffin or cookies fairly quickly. Or, you might want to buy a mix to save time (you’ll still save money).

Before buying chips and snacks, you may also want to consider if there is a more affordable DIY option, like buying popcorn kernels to cook on the stove.

Asking yourself, “Can I make this?” will likely result in saving money and getting the freshest item possible. This way, you can reward yourself without breaking your budget.

30. Hit the Store on a Wednesday

When it comes to snagging good deals, shopping on a Wednesday may be beneficial. That’s because grocery stores tend to restock their shelves and make new markdowns in the middle of the week. Since they’re in the process of changing the discounts, they may still honor the price cuts from last week’s sale as well as the new ones, which could help boost your savings.

31. Do the Prep Work Yourself

Those packaged baby carrots and bagged pre-washed salads make it easier to eat healthier, but if you’re willing to do the cleaning, prepping, and chopping of fresh produce, and even meats and poultry, you can save money.

A boneless, skinless chicken breast package will cost more than buying a whole chicken. You’re paying for the convenience. By setting aside time to prep and chop your foods after you get home from grocery shopping, you’ll likely reap savings.

The Takeaway

A little planning and knowing some money-saving tricks can help you lower your monthly grocery bill and stick to your budget.

By following these budget shopping tips, you may find that you have more money left over each month to pay down debt, invest for the future, or save for something fun. And those funds can grow if you put them in an interest-bearing bank account.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.


Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

What is a realistic budget for groceries?

The average household spends $270 a week on groceries, but how much you need to spend will vary on family size, location, and other considerations.

Which store is cheapest to buy groceries?

Which grocery store is cheapest will vary from location to location, but among the most affordable are Aldi, Lidl, Market Basket, WinCo, and Trader Joe’s.

How can I make my grocery bill cheaper?

Some ways to go grocery shopping on a budget include buying in bulk, buying generic products, planning your meals in advance, and using coupons, apps, and loyalty clubs.


SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


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How Many Savings Accounts Should I Have?

How many savings accounts you should have will depend on your savings goals and money management style. You may prefer the simplicity of having just one savings account. Or, you might find it helpful to have different savings accounts for different savings goals, such as an “emergency fund” and a “travel fund.”

There’s no ideal number of savings accounts to have, nor is there a limit to how many savings accounts you can open. So what’s the right number?

Read on to learn why you may want to have more than one savings account, the pros and cons of having multiple savings accounts, types of savings accounts to consider, and how to manage your savings accounts so you reach your financial goals.

Key Points

•   Multiple savings accounts can help separate and manage funds for different financial goals effectively.

•   An emergency fund should ideally be kept in a distinct account to avoid accidental use.

•   Using different accounts facilitates easier tracking of progress towards individual savings goals.

•   There are benefits to having multiple accounts, such as better organization and potentially earning more interest.

•   Managing multiple accounts might involve additional fees and requires careful monitoring to avoid errors.

How Many Savings Accounts Should You Have?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. The number of savings accounts you should have depends on your financial goals and personal preferences. Some people find it helpful to have multiple accounts to separate their savings for different purposes, such as an emergency fund, a vacation fund, or a down payment on a house. Others prefer to keep all their savings in a single account for simplicity.

You might aim to have at least two savings accounts, one for your emergency fund (since you don’t want to accidentally deplete that for another purpose) and one for other savings goals. Or, you might want to further subdivide your savings. For example, you might have savings accounts for:

•   A vacation

•   A home improvement project

•   A down payment for a car or home

•   Holiday shopping

•   A wedding or other event

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Open a SoFi Checking and Savings account and earn up to 4.60% APY - with no minimum balance and no account fees.


Reasons to Have Multiple Savings Accounts

Here’s a look at some reasons why you may find it helpful to have more than one savings account.

Separating Your Goals

Having multiple accounts allows you to separate your savings for different goals. This can make it easier to track your progress toward each goal and avoid the temptation to dip into funds earmarked for a specific purpose.

Emergency Fund

Many financial experts recommend having enough money set aside in an emergency fund to cover at least three to six month’s worth of living expenses. This helps ensure you can pay for a sudden expense like a car repair or medical bill without having to run up expensive debt. By keeping your emergency fund in a separate account, you’re less likely to touch it until it’s truly needed.

Tracking Your Progress

If all of your savings are lumped into one account, it can be hard to tell how much you have saved up for different goals, and how much farther you have to go. For example, if your goals include building up your emergency fund, saving for a vacation next year, and making a down payment on a home within three years, it can be unclear how much you’ve put away for each purpose. If you have multiple accounts, on the other hand, you’ll have different balances attached to different goals.

Advantages of Having Multiple Savings Accounts

There are both pros and cons to having more than one savings account. Here’s a look at some of the benefits.

•   Organization: Multiple accounts can help you keep your savings organized and easily accessible for different purposes.

•   Goal tracking: Separating your savings into different accounts makes it easier to track your progress toward each goal.

•   Earning more bonuses: If you set up savings accounts at several financial institutions, you might reap an account-opening bonus (which is usually cash) from each bank or credit union.

•   Get a higher interest rate: Opening savings accounts at different banks could help you take advantage of higher interest rates. For example, your brick-and-mortar bank may pay a lower annual percentage yield (APY) for a regular savings account compared to a high-yield savings account at an online bank.

Disadvantages to Having Multiple Savings Accounts

There are also some downsides to having multiple savings accounts. Here are some to consider.

•   It may trigger fees: Some savings accounts may be fee-free, while others might charge fees if your account dips below a certain balance. If you can’t meet the minimum balance required for each account, you could end up racking up fees by having multiple savings accounts.

•   More difficult to keep track of: Managing multiple accounts can be more time-consuming and require more effort than managing a single account. You may find that monitoring multiple accounts is too much of a juggling act.

•   Potential for errors: With multiple accounts, there is a risk of forgetting about or neglecting some accounts, which could lead to missed savings opportunities.

•   You could lose out on higher interest rates: Some banks have a tiered interest rate structure for savings accounts, meaning you only earn the highest rates once your balance reaches a certain amount. If your money is spread out, you may find it hard to reach the threshold for the best rate.

Types of Savings Accounts to Consider

There are different types of savings accounts you can open, and which one is best will depend on your goals and needs. Here’s a brief look at how they compare.

•   Traditional savings accounts: These accounts are offered by brick-and-mortar banks and credit unions and are designed to be a basic savings option. They typically pay a low interest rate, and may come with a monthly or minimum balance fee.

•   High-yield savings accounts: These accounts offer a higher interest rate than the average for savings accounts. You’re more likely to find high-yield savings accounts at online banks, though some traditional banks and credit unions offer them. In addition to providing higher average APYs, online banks usually charge lower (or no) fees due to their reduced overhead costs.

•   Money market accounts: These accounts are a hybrid of a checking account and a savings account. They pay interest on your deposits and also allow you to write checks or make withdrawals and purchases using a debit card. Money market accounts typically offer higher interest rates than basic savings accounts but may have higher minimum balance requirements.

•   Certificate of Deposit (CD): Certificates of deposit, or CDs, usually pay a higher yield than traditional savings accounts because you agree to let the bank keep your money locked up for a specific term that could range from three months to five years or longer. Should you need to withdraw your money before the CD has matured, you’ll incur an early withdrawal penalty.

Tips on Managing Multiple Savings Accounts

While having more than one savings account may sound confusing, it doesn’t have to be. Here are six tips for making the most of multiple savings accounts.

1.   Use account nicknames. If your bank allows it, consider giving each saving account a title, such as “Hawaii Fund” or “New Furniture Fund.” This makes it easy to identify the account and track your progress.

2.   Look for the best rates. If you’re looking to open a new savings account, see what online banks are offering (thanks to lower overhead, online-only banks often offer the most competitive APYs).

3.   Automate your savings. Setting up automatic transfers from your checking account to your savings accounts will ensure that you’re consistently saving toward your goals.

4.   Use technology to track your accounts. Many banks offer online or mobile banking apps that make it easy to track your savings goals and account balances all in one place.

5.   Resist the urge to dip into different accounts for different needs. For example, try not to touch your emergency fund to come up with cash for a home improvement project.

6.   Stay on top of your financial goals. If your goals change, you might want to adjust how much money is going into each account – and how often.

Recommended: How Much Money Should I Save a Month?

The Takeaway

Ultimately, the decision of how many savings accounts to have is an individual one. While having multiple accounts can offer benefits such as goal separation and organization, it’s important to weigh these benefits against the potential drawbacks, such as fees and complexity.

By carefully considering your financial situation and goals, you can make an informed decision about how many savings accounts are right for you.

Interested in opening an online bank account? When you sign up for a SoFi Checking and Savings account with direct deposit, you’ll get a competitive annual percentage yield (APY), pay zero account fees, and enjoy an array of rewards, such as access to the Allpoint Network of 55,000+ fee-free ATMs globally. Qualifying accounts can even access their paycheck up to two days early.


Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

Is it a good idea to have multiple savings accounts?

Having multiple savings accounts can be a good idea for several reasons. It can help you organize your finances by separating your savings goals, such as an emergency fund, a vacation fund, or a down payment for a house. Being able to clearly see individual goals and track progress can help you stay committed and motivated to save.

However, having multiple accounts can also mean more fees (if your bank charges them) and more effort to manage them, so it’s important to weigh the pros and cons based on your individual financial situation and goals.

Can you have multiple savings accounts at the same bank?

Yes. Many banks allow customers to open multiple accounts, each with its own account number and possibly different features or benefits. This can be useful for organizing your savings for different purposes or for taking advantage of different interest rates or account types offered by the bank.

What is the cost of having multiple savings accounts?

The cost of having multiple savings accounts can vary depending on the bank and the specific accounts you have. Some banks don’t charge any fees for savings accounts. Others may charge monthly maintenance fees or only charge fees if your account dips below a certain minimum balance. Before you open multiple savings accounts, you’ll want to make sure you understand what fees (if any) may be involved.


SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


Our account fee policy is subject to change at any time.
Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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50-30-20 budget rule

The 50/30/20 Rule: Budgeting Your Money Wisely

Wouldn’t it be great if there were a super simple way to budget; say, no more than three figures you had to keep in mind to take control of your finances? That’s exactly what the 50/30/20 budget rule (aka the 50 30 20 rule) can do for you. It’s a simple and effective way to manage your money, allocating 50% of your take-home income to “musts,” 30% to “wants,” and 20% to saving for your future.

For anyone who has ever felt that budgeting was too complicated and headache-triggering to take on, this guideline can make things clear and easy.

Key Points

•   The 50/30/20 budget rule simplifies financial planning by allocating income into three categories: needs, wants, and savings.

•   Essential expenses should take up 50% of after-tax income, covering necessities like housing and food.

•   Discretionary spending, or “wants,” should account for 30% of the budget, including entertainment and non-essential purchases.

•   Savings and financial goals should receive 20% of income, emphasizing the importance of future financial security.

•   This budgeting method was popularized by Senator Elizabeth Warren to help individuals manage finances more effectively.

What Is the 50/30/20 Rule?

The 50/30/20 budget or “rule” is a budgeting framework that can be relatively easy to create and implement. It’s one potential way to help keep your finances on track and help you work towards your goals.

The 50/30/20 numbers refer to percentages of your take-home income that you would allocate to three main categories: ”needs” or “musts” (essentials), “wants” (nonessentials), and saving (financial goals), respectively.

The primary goal of the 50/30/20 rule is to learn to prioritize saving money by making it a key part of your spending plan.

Everyone’s financial needs and goals are different, however. And, while these percentages can be a great starting point, you may find that you need to tweak these exact numbers to better suit your needs and current financial situation.

Where Did the 50/30/20 Rule Come From?

The 50/30/20 budget rule gained popularity when Sen. Elizabeth Warren explained it in her book, “All Your Worth: The Ultimate Lifetime Money Plan,” which was first published in 2005.

The simplicity of the concept (and the math) contributed to its appeal. The idea of dividing one’s money into three instantly understandable buckets proved to have staying power.

How the 50/30/20 Rule Works

In the 50/30/20 budget, you allocate your take-home (or after-tax) income into three main categories or buckets according to percentages.

Recommended: Check out the 50/30/20 calculator to see a breakdown of your money.

50% to “Needs”

These are things you cannot live without and the bills you cannot avoid paying. Consider them the “musts;” the items that you need to survive or that would leave you in a difficult situation if you didn’t pay them.

Here are some examples of typical needs:

•   Rent or one of the different kinds of mortgage payments that are possible (in a nutshell, your housing costs)

•   Utilities, including electricity, WiFi, and water

•   Car payments and/or other transportation expenses (say, to get to work)

•   Groceries (but not that pricey takeout salad)

•   Basic clothing (what you need to wear in daily life, at work, and/or to stay warm; not the latest style of jeans just because they’re cool)

•   Insurance payments

•   Healthcare costs

•   Debt payment, such as the minimums on student loans and/or your credit card

The “needs” category does not include items that are extras, such as Netflix, dining out, and clothing beyond what you need for work. Those fall under the next category.

30% to “Wants”

Also known as personal, discretionary, or nonessential spending, these are the things you buy that you could technically live without. This includes:

•   Dining out or takeout food

•   Going to the movies, a show, or a concert

•   Vacation/travel costs

•   Streaming channel subscriptions (unless they are somehow vital for your work)

•   New clothes, simply because you feel like buying them

•   Electronics that are cool but not vital to your job

•   Spa treatments

•   Ubers or taxis instead of public transportation.

Wants are all the little extras and upgrades you spend money on that make life more fun.

20% to Savings

This is the money you save for future financial goals. This category often provides a means to financial security. This includes:

•   Money put into an emergency fund

•   Saving for a downpayment on a home

•   IRA or other retirement contributions

•   Extra payments to help pay off your loans sooner (minimum payments are part of the “needs” category).

Even though the budget is written as 50/30/20, the purpose of this system is to prioritize the saving aspect, this 20%. (It may be more appropriately named the 20/50/30 budget.) The goal here is to get people to save for tomorrow rather than just spend today.

The idea is to make space for the 20% without laboring over the rest. The minutiae of where your fun money is going ($5 for a latte here, $10 for an appetizer there) isn’t super important if you’re saving enough to meet your financial goals.

Another point to note: If you aren’t saving 20% of your income right now, that’s okay. The process of setting up the 50/30/20 budget will help you find out where your money is going so that you can make adjustments. After completing your budget breakdown, you can address the areas where you’d like to cut back.

Get up to $300 when you bank with SoFi.

Open a SoFi Checking and Savings Account with direct deposit and get up to a $300 cash bonus. Plus, get up to 4.60% APY on your cash!


Benefits of the 50/30/20 Budget

The 50/30/20 rule may be a minimalist budget, but it can pack the same powerful benefits you would get with a more labor-intensive budget.

Some of the payoffs of setting up and following a 50/30/20 include:

•   Knowing where you stand. As a popular adage goes, “what gets measured gets improved.” It can be hard to start spending less and saving more if you aren’t clear on how much and where you are currently spending.

•   Identifying easy ways to cut back. As with any budgeting process, the 50/30/20 budget can reveal opportunities to cut back on spending. Simply going through the process – and seeing exactly where your money is going each month – can help to motivate you to make some relatively pain-free adjustments.

•   Reducing financial stress. While building a budget may seem like a stress-inducing exercise, it can ultimately relieve a lot of financial worry. It can add structure and clarity to your spending. Instead of angsting over every purchase, you’ll have built-in boundaries that allow you to spend freely within your budget.

•   Simplifying the budgeting process. By having fewer categories than a traditional monthly budget, the 50/30/20 rule of thumb can be easy to set up and to maintain. It can also be simple to track a 50/30/20 budget digitally.

•   Achieving your savings goals. By making saving a priority and setting some money aside before you start spending, a 50/30/20 budget can help you work effectively towards your financial goals. Whether that’s creating an emergency fund, making a downpayment on a home, or going on a great vacation is your decision.

Tips for Implementing the 50/30/20 Budget

Want to give the 50/30/20 budget a try? If you decide to go this route, or you’re just looking for some budgeting basics, here are some steps you can take to get started.

Gathering Your Financial Records

To get started with any kind of budget, it’s helpful to collect the last three months or so of bank and credit card statements, pay stubs, receipts, and bills.

Calculating Your Monthly Income

You can use your statements to figure out exactly how much money you are bringing in each month after taxes are taken out. You can think of after-tax dollars as the pot of money you have to siphon into the three budget categories each month.

Setting a Savings Target

You may want to begin with the most important category, which is the 20% (savings). Since the goal for this budget is to turn the 20% into a nonnegotiable part of the plan, you’d calculate 20% of your monthly after-tax income and set that figure aside for things like debt repayment, cash savings, retirement investing, and any other financial goals that you have.

Even if you don’t feel it’s realistic for you to put 20% into saving right now, you might run the exercise assuming that you will. You’ll be able to tinker with the numbers later.

Calculating Essential Monthly Expenses

Next, you may want to make a list of all of your monthly essential or fixed expenses, such as rent/mortgage, utilities, groceries, and insurance.

Currently, do essential items absorb more than 50% of your take-home income each month? If so, what percentage do they comprise? And, is there any way to reduce any of these monthly expenses?

Building a Hypothetical Budget

After adding up savings and essentials, what is left over is what can be allocated towards discretionary spending, or the “wants” outline above.

It can be helpful to keep in mind that the 50/30/20 numbers are just a guideline. If the cost of living is high where you live, for example, it may not be feasible to keep essentials to 50% of your take-home income. In this case, you may need to reduce spending on wants.

Or, you may decide that at this point you can’t quite afford to put 20% into savings. There are variations on the 50/30/20 theme that accommodate these situations, such as the 70/20/10 rule, which acknowledges that for some people, a hefty 70% will be needed for the “musts” of life.

Recommended: Cost of Living by State Comparison

Once you see your numbers in black and white, you can play with the percentages and come up with a workable plan for roughly how much you can spend on nonessentials, or fun, each month.

Putting Your Plan into Action

Now that you have a basic guideline of how much money you will put into one type of savings account each month and how much cash you can spend each month on wants, it’s time to give your budget a try.

You may want to plan on tracking your spending for two to three months to start. You can do this by saving receipts and logging expenses according to the three categories at the end of the day. Or, you could use a budgeting app that makes it easy to track and categorize expenses.

Another tip: Try automating your finances and having money transferred from your checking account to your savings right after payday. That way, you won’t see the cash sitting in checking and think it’s there for the spending.

Making Some Tweaks

After tracking your spending for several months, you’ll probably have enough data to refine your original 50/30/20 budget. From there you can adjust the categories based on your actual spending, not just your projected spending.

You may also find that you need to adjust your spending. Discretionary spending is typically the easiest place to do some trimming.

You may decide you need to cook at home (rather than get takeout) a few more times a week, save on streaming services by dropping a channel you rarely watch, or ditch the gym membership and work out at home.

it may also be possible to pare back some of your fixed monthly expenses. Reducing utility bills, saving on gas, and, if possible, rent, could free up more money for fun spending.

After making some adjustments, you can execute your new and improved budget. You may want to continue to track spending in a method that works best for you until spending according to your budget becomes second nature.

The Takeaway

The 50/30/20 rule of thumb is a set of easy guidelines for how to plan your budget. Using them, you allocate your monthly after-tax income to the three categories: 50% to “needs,” 30% to “wants,” and 20% to saving for your financial goals.

Your percentages may need to be adjusted based on your personal circumstances and goals. But using this simple formula can be a good way to get a better handle on your finances, and to start working more effectively towards your goals.

You may find that technology can make sticking to a budget simpler. If you open a bank account online with SoFi, you’ll have features and perks that can help make the most of your money. Our Checking and Savings offers a competitive annual percentage yield (APY) and charges you no account fees. Plus you’ll spend and save in one convenient place, be able to track where your money goes, and use Vaults and Roundups to boost your savings.

Better banking is here with SoFi, NerdWallet’s 2024 winner for Best Checking Account Overall.* Enjoy up to 4.60% APY on SoFi Checking and Savings.

FAQ

Is the 50/30/20 rule a realistic goal?

For many people, the 50/30/20 rule is a realistic way to budget for essentials, discretionary expenses, and savings contributions. For others, it may not be realistic. If you are just starting your work life, earn a lower salary, live in an area where housing is very expensive, or have considerable debt to manage, you might do better with a different budget guideline.

Is the 50/30/20 rule weekly or monthly?

When budgeting, people typically work with their monthly expenses, since that is how housing costs, utilities, and other payments (say, student loans and credit card debt) are assessed. You could, however, apply the 50/30/20 guideline to your weekly spending and see how your finances are tracking.

What is the 60/30/10 rule budget?

The 60/30/10 budget is a different version of the 50/30/20 rule that can work well for super savers. It allocates 30% more for the “musts” of life and 10% for discretionary spending. The remaining 60% is for saving, investment, and paying off debt.

What is the 70/20/10 rule for money?

The 70/20/10 rule is a budgeting system that allocates 70% of one’s take-home income towards needs (minus debt) and “wants” (discretionary spending), 20% to saving and investing, and 10% towards debt repayment or donations.


SoFi® Checking and Savings is offered through SoFi Bank, N.A. ©2023 SoFi Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.
The SoFi Bank Debit Mastercard® is issued by SoFi Bank, N.A., pursuant to license by Mastercard International Incorporated and can be used everywhere Mastercard is accepted. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design is a trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated.


SoFi members with direct deposit activity can earn 4.60% annual percentage yield (APY) on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Direct Deposit means a recurring deposit of regular income to an account holder’s SoFi Checking or Savings account, including payroll, pension, or government benefit payments (e.g., Social Security), made by the account holder’s employer, payroll or benefits provider or government agency (“Direct Deposit”) via the Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) Network during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Deposits that are not from an employer or government agency, including but not limited to check deposits, peer-to-peer transfers (e.g., transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc.), merchant transactions (e.g., transactions from PayPal, Stripe, Square, etc.), and bank ACH funds transfers and wire transfers from external accounts, or are non-recurring in nature (e.g., IRS tax refunds), do not constitute Direct Deposit activity. There is no minimum Direct Deposit amount required to qualify for the stated interest rate.

As an alternative to direct deposit, SoFi members with Qualifying Deposits can earn 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances. Qualifying Deposits means one or more deposits that, in the aggregate, are equal to or greater than $5,000 to an account holder’s SoFi Checking and Savings account (“Qualifying Deposits”) during a 30-day Evaluation Period (as defined below). Qualifying Deposits only include those deposits from the following eligible sources: (i) ACH transfers, (ii) inbound wire transfers, (iii) peer-to-peer transfers (i.e., external transfers from PayPal, Venmo, etc. and internal peer-to-peer transfers from a SoFi account belonging to another account holder), (iv) check deposits, (v) instant funding to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, (vi) push payments to your SoFi Bank Debit Card, and (vii) cash deposits. Qualifying Deposits do not include: (i) transfers between an account holder’s Checking account, Savings account, and/or Vaults; (ii) interest payments; (iii) bonuses issued by SoFi Bank or its affiliates; or (iv) credits, reversals, and refunds from SoFi Bank, N.A. (“SoFi Bank”) or from a merchant.

SoFi Bank shall, in its sole discretion, assess each account holder’s Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits throughout each 30-Day Evaluation Period to determine the applicability of rates and may request additional documentation for verification of eligibility. The 30-Day Evaluation Period refers to the “Start Date” and “End Date” set forth on the APY Details page of your account, which comprises a period of 30 calendar days (the “30-Day Evaluation Period”). You can access the APY Details page at any time by logging into your SoFi account on the SoFi mobile app or SoFi website and selecting either (i) Banking > Savings > Current APY or (ii) Banking > Checking > Current APY. Upon receiving a Direct Deposit or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits to your account, you will begin earning 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% on checking balances on or before the following calendar day. You will continue to earn these APYs for (i) the remainder of the current 30-Day Evaluation Period and through the end of the subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period and (ii) any following 30-day Evaluation Periods during which SoFi Bank determines you to have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits without interruption.

SoFi Bank reserves the right to grant a grace period to account holders following a change in Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits activity before adjusting rates. If SoFi Bank grants you a grace period, the dates for such grace period will be reflected on the APY Details page of your account. If SoFi Bank determines that you did not have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits during the current 30-day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, then you will begin earning the rates earned by account holders without either Direct Deposit or Qualifying Deposits until you have Direct Deposit activity or $5,000 in Qualifying Deposits in a subsequent 30-Day Evaluation Period. For the avoidance of doubt, an account holder with both Direct Deposit activity and Qualifying Deposits will earn the rates earned by account holders with Direct Deposit.

Members without either Direct Deposit activity or Qualifying Deposits, as determined by SoFi Bank, during a 30-Day Evaluation Period and, if applicable, the grace period, will earn 1.20% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) and 0.50% APY on checking balances.

Interest rates are variable and subject to change at any time. These rates are current as of 10/24/2023. There is no minimum balance requirement. Additional information can be found at https://www.sofi.com/legal/banking-rate-sheet.


Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

Third-Party Brand Mentions: No brands, products, or companies mentioned are affiliated with SoFi, nor do they endorse or sponsor this article. Third-party trademarks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

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