Dogecoin Price History: 2013 to 2022

Dogecoin Price History: 2013 to 2023

Dogecoin (DOGE) — the infamous meme coin that launched in 2013 — has had a wild history of price fluctuations. At one point, it was worth a fraction of a penny, but then saw a “to the moon” moment where it peaked at an all-time high of about 74 cents in May of 2021.

Based on a viral internet meme of a Japanese Shiba Inu dog, Dogecoin (pronounced “dohj”) was created by two software engineers, Billy Marcus and Jackson Palmer, in 2013. The coin has never been worth even one dollar.

Doge was originally designed to be a simple blockchain-based payment system. However, it quickly attracted a large number of supporters who developed new use cases for it, including a third-party tipping service bot called “DogeTipBot” that interfaced with Reddit, where users could send tips for content posted on the site.

Dogecoin Price History

The code for Dogecoin is based on Litecoin, and uses scrypt technology. That scrypt technology set it apart from other kinds of cryptocurrency, including Bitcoin, which uses a different proof-of-work algorithm called SHA-256.

Essentially, Dogecoin’s code allows for an unlimited supply of dogecoins, which has contributed to its historically low price.

This makes Dogecoin a so-called “inflationary coin,” whereas Bitcoin and similar cryptocurrencies are considered deflationary, because there’s a fixed limit to the number of coins miners can create. Dogecoin launched with a total supply limit, similar to Bitcoin’s total coin limit, but the Doge supply is no longer capped. Plus, anyone can begin mining Doge immediately.

The price of Doge picked up in popularity over the years, with prices rising and dipping in 2017, and then hitting a peak in 2018 from bullish investors’ support. The cryptocurrency reached another level, however, when Tesla CEO Elon Musk and some other celebrities began tweeting about Doge at the start of 2021.

Between January and May 2021, Doge rose by 9,884%, from about 3 cents to 74 cents.

Dogecoin Price History

Dogecoin Price in 2013: The Start

Dogecoin Price in 2013: $0.00 to $0.0004

On December 15, 2013, Doge was first traded on cryptocurrency exchanges at a price of $0.00. The currency became popular among crypto users, and two weeks after its launch, the r/Dogecoin Reddit channel started attracting thousands of users and contributors.

Within the first two weeks of its launch, the Doge’s price soared from $0.0002 to $0.0023, which amounted to a 1,061% increase, although the ultimate value at the end of 2013 was still miniscule.

Dogecoin Price 2014 to 2019: Catching the Public Eye

Dogecoin Price 2014 to 2019: $0.0003 to $0.0020

The 2014 launch of DogeTipBot, a crypto tipping service, was a watershed moment for the cryptocurrency because it attracted users who normally would not have used Doge. It also attracted users who would not have had exposure to other types of cryptocurrency or digital tokens.

In 2014, the Doge community also used the currency to donate more than $170,000 in Doge to charitable organizations, including the Dogecoin community’s 2014 donation of 27 million Dogecoins (roughly $30,000 at the time) to help the Jamaican bobsled team compete at the Sochi Winter Olympic games.

The token did not see major price hikes until March 2017, when Doge’s price rose by 1,494%. Then, bullish investors began taking interest in Doge in November of 2017 when the price rose again.

That January 2018, Doge prices rose again and reached another peak, at $0.018. Dogecoin’s market capitalization broke $1 billion around that time. For the following two years, however, Doge had low trading activity.

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Dogecoin Price in 2020

Dogecoin Price in 2020: $0.0023 to $0.0046

In January of 2020, Doge was $0.0023. That year, the price hit a new peak in July at $0.0032 and then dipped over the next couple of months, until the price surged again in November and reached $0.0035. The year wrapped with Doge at $0.0046.

Dogecoin Price in 2021: All-Time Highs

Dogecoin Price in 2021: $0.0368 to $0.1702

In 2021, Doge began to gain traction again with renewed public support and interest. Between January and May of 2021, Doge rose by 9,884%. By May 2021, Dogecoin rose to its all-time high of $0.74, which is remarkable considering it started the year at $0.0368.

Dogecoin Price in 2022: Settling Down

Dogecoin Price in 2022: $0.1416 to $0.0858

Doge started at $0.1416 in January 2022, which saw a 16.8% price decrease from December 2021. The price surged in March to $0.1380 and then decreased again in May to $0.0858. As of July 20, 2022, Doge was worth $0.074, with a total circulating supply of about 132 billion coins.

Considerations When Investing in Dogecoin

There are a few considerations to keep in mind when investing in Dogecoin. While the coin has seen some incredible peaks and troughs, Doge has never been worth more than a dollar. There’s an unlimited supply of Dogecoin, which means that the value relies on buyers constantly buying new Doge that enters circulation.

There may be higher security risks with Doge because it hasn’t had the same level of code security or scrutiny that many other currencies have had. That goes back to the fact that it initially wasn’t treated as a serious cryptocurrency.

Another consideration is that holdings are becoming increasingly concentrated (much like with other crypto assets) — in fact, nine wallets hold more than 40% of all Dogecoin, one of which holds close to 30%. That means that those investors have a heavy hand on how the price could potentially change — they could cash out and the price of Doge would fall, or they could use their large position to manipulate the price of Doge.

The entities with large holdings that could potentially move the markets are often called “whales.”

The Takeaway

For a currency that started at $0.00, its lowest price, Doge has had a remarkable journey. Its most exciting phases include the tipping service DogeTipBot and Musk’s public support of the currency, which caused its peak price of $0.74 and a 9,884% increase within five months in 2021.


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What Does FUD Mean in Investing in Crypto?

What Does FUD Mean?

FUD stands for “fear, uncertainty, and doubt” and refers to a general mindset of pessimism about a particular asset or market, as well as the manipulation of investor or consumer emotions so that they succumb to FUD.

While the term “fear, uncertainty, and doubt” has been in circulation for a century or so, it became popular as the abbreviation FUD in the 1970s — and widely known more recently, thanks to the highly volatile crypto markets. FUD is also used throughout finance and can apply to any asset class.

Here’s what you need to know about FUD now.

What Does FUD Mean in Investing?

Investment strategies based on fear, uncertainty, and doubt are not usually recommended. Sometimes FUD might be justified, but in general, the term is used to describe irrational, overwhelming negative sentiment in the market.

Many investors have concrete or pragmatic fears and doubts. Some investors worry that they’ve invested too little or too late (or both). Others might fear a total market meltdown. Some investors worry that an unforeseen factor could impact their investments. These are ordinary, common concerns.

FUD is different, and it’s important to understand what FUD is. When investors talk about FUD, they’re referring to rumors and hype that spread through media (and social media) that drive impulsive and often irrational investor decisions. Think about the meme stock craze.

Thus the term FUD can often have a demeaning edge, in the sense that it refers to these unpredictable waves of investor behavior.

FUD vs FOMO: What Is the Difference?

What is FUD in stocks or the stock market? FUD can be thought of as the opposite of FOMO (fear of missing out). While FOMO tends to inspire people to do what others are doing — often in that they don’t want to miss out on a hot stock and potential gains — FUD can be described as a collective negative effect that spreads like wildfire, typically through social media.

When markets are going up, many people fall victim to FOMO trading, but when markets are going down, FUD can also spread swiftly. In the most basic sense, you could think of it like this: FUD equals fear and FOMO equals greed.

The two can sometimes be contrary indicators. In other words, when FUD seems to be everywhere, astute investors might actually be buying assets at reduced prices (aka buying the dip), and when many people are experiencing FOMO, seasoned traders might actually be selling at a premium.

Crypto traders offer a counter to FUD by using the term “hodl.” The hodl meaning is interpreted as “hold on for dear life.” Hodl comes from an old Reddit post where an investor posted a rant about having trouble timing the market, while misspelling the word “hold” several times.

The phrase was initially used in reference to Bitcoin but can apply to different types of cryptocurrency.

What Does FUD Mean in Crypto?

While FUD is often associated with investor sentiment in the crypto markets, the phrase “fear, uncertainty, and doubt” actually has a much longer history than many people realize.

The History of FUD

According to Wikipedia, the general term “fear, uncertainty, and doubt” dates back to the 1920s, but its abbreviation as FUD may have begun in 1975 when an executive departed IBM to start his own company, and noted that FUD was being used as a tactic to discourage customers from leaving IBM.

The use of FUD soon gained traction in marketing, sales, and public relations, and was used to indicate a psychological manipulation through disinformation.

As FUD traveled over to the investing realm, it has taken on a broader connotation — particularly in the crypto markets — referring to the potential many investors have to succumb to sudden anxiety or pessimism that changes their behavior.

FUD and Crypto

In crypto, FUD has become a well-known crypto term, and it means one of two things:

1.    To spread doubt about a particular token or project in an attempt to manipulate prices downward.

2.    The general skepticism and cynicism about crypto as an asset class, and any related news/events. Even the rumor of a negative event possibly happening can generate FUD.

•   A crypto influencer tweets that a large company won’t accept BTC as payment: FUD

•   China allegedly bans Bitcoin for the umpteenth time: FUD

•   An investment manager says they will never own crypto: FUD

FUD Crypto and Memes

Crypto FUD also tends to involve the spreading of memes that can either amplify or lessen the FUD’s effect. Sometimes FUD being spread by the media is widely seen as trivial, in which case memes making fun of the idea might pop up. Or, if the FUD is perceived as more legitimate, memes making fun of those not taking the threat seriously might start circulating.

When Can FUD Occur?

FUD can occur whenever prices are falling or a big event happens that’s widely thought to be bearish. A company could miss earnings expectations or it could be revealed that an influential investor has taken a short position against a stock. Or the FUD could come from a larger source, like a pandemic, natural disaster, or the threat of a government defaulting on its debt.

The more catastrophic something could theoretically be, and the greater uncertainty surrounding its outcome, the more it becomes a suitable subject for people to spread FUD.
Sometimes markets react swiftly across the board to such news. Other times people take things out of context or exaggerate them, creating a sort of fake news buzz to scare others into selling.

In stocks and other regulated securities, it’s against the law to spread FUD with the intention of lowering prices. Doing so is considered to be a form of market manipulation and could subject individuals to legal action from regulatory agencies like the SEC, FINRA, or FINCEN.

As not all cryptocurrencies have been definitively classified as securities by all regulatory agencies, there is still some gray area. The idea that many altcoins could one day be deemed securities has itself become a big topic of FUD, because it would have a big impact on the regulatory landscape surrounding crypto.

FUD Crypto Examples

Here are a few well-known examples of FUD in crypto. These examples show FUD at its finest. There are elements of truth to them, but the idea is that their detrimental impacts to asset prices are exaggerated to the point of hysteria.

China Banning Bitcoin

This might be one of the best examples of FUD in crypto, and perhaps the one that has been the subject of more memes and Twitter rants than any other.

Practically every year since crypto hit the scene in a big way, and sometimes multiple times per year, officials in China claim to ban Bitcoin in one way or another. Of course, a real, comprehensive “ban” on Bitcoin would be a one-time event. What really happens is the Chinese government introduces some kind of restrictions for individuals or organizations involved in crypto markets, and media outlets report the event as a “ban on Bitcoin.”

In 2021, China really did make Bitcoin mining illegal in the country. Even so, markets shrugged off the event over time.

Government Regulation

Regulatory concerns coming from any national government can be a big source of fear, uncertainty, and doubt. Because crypto markets are still somewhat new, many countries have yet to adopt regulatory frameworks around crypto that provide specific rules around the use and taxation of cryptocurrencies.

Several countries have tried to make any use of crypto illegal, while others make public statements about harsh restrictions coming down the line. Whether the threat is real or perceived, the mere suggestion of governments cracking down on crypto transactions tends to spook investors.

Bitcoin Boils the Oceans

Another example of FUD is the argument that some forms of crypto use so much energy that it’s not sustainable, making it a dangerous threat to the planet. These concerns usually refer to proof-of-work (PoW) crypto like Bitcoin, Dogecoin, Litecoin, Bitcoin Cash, Ethereum Classic, and others that require vast amounts of computer power for mining coins.

However, some analysts claim that a good portion of crypto mining is done with renewable energy. Moreover, these analysts note that gold mining, banking, transportation, construction, healthcare, and other industries use exponentially more energy than it takes to maintain the Bitcoin network.

💡 Recommended: How Much Electricity Is Needed to Mine Bitcoin?

The Fear of Lost Crypto

Nothing stokes investors’ fears like the idea of investment losses, but with crypto there’s the even greater dread of actually losing your coins. Unfortunately, there is some truth to that anxiety, in that there are notable cases of crypto being lost and never recovered, usually because someone loses the private keys that gave them access to their crypto.

Unfortunately, because crypto is decentralized, investors’ assets aren’t protected the same way they would be in traditional, centralized banking systems. (While it’s theoretically possible that all your cash money could vanish from your bank overnight, it’s highly improbable. And even if it did, you’d have the benefit of FDIC insurance.)

Influential Crypto Tweets

Another example of FUD includes some well-known Tweets and/or social media posts by famous people that had an immediate impact on a given type of crypto.

It’s important to remember that FUD moments don’t last, and the impact of a single power person on the price of a certain coin — even if it roiled markets for a period of time — was temporary.

Corporate Crypto Assets

In the last couple of years, several big corporations have launched, or announced plans to launch, a proprietary form of crypto. These include Facebook/Meta, JP Morgan Chase, Google, Amazon, Mitsubishi, and others.

Unfortunately, it’s not that easy to get a new crypto off the ground — despite the many comparisons between the crypto markets and the frontiers of the Wild West — and the failure of at least one high-profile coin helped to sow FUD for some investors.

Crypto Tax Law Changes

Whenever the question of crypto’s regulatory identity comes up (Is it a security or a commodity?) FUD ensues. That’s largely because of tax issues. Right now the regulations are up in the air, but the fear is that if crypto is deemed a security the SEC will have oversight and that could impact crypto companies and investors in a big way.

Solar Storms

Because crypto is digital, a great deal of FUD stems from technology-based fears that random events could take down electrical grids and effectively wipe out crypto holdings. One such FUD-inducing rumor is about the possibility of Earth being zapped by solar storms, but the scientific validity of this has yet to be confirmed.

The Takeaway

Crypto FUD is one of many crypto terms that have become popular, but the underlying concept — that fear, uncertainty, and doubt can influence investor behavior — is not new. In fact, FUD as an actual strategy exists in many spheres, including marketing, sales, public relations, politics (and of course crypto).

FUD can come from anywhere and be focused on just about anything, but crypto can be particularly vulnerable to FUD because this market is already quite volatile. It’s also a very new sector, and some investors don’t fully understand the technology involved, and they can be manipulated by alarmist rumors or even celebrity opinions.

Fortunately, many investors take a more rational approach to the markets and to crypto in particular.

FAQ

Who uses FUD?

Some FUD arises naturally from market movements or economic conditions. Some FUD is deliberately cooked up to instill enough fear in the markets that investors make impulsive decisions, e.g. selling one type of crypto for another.

Why does FUD matter?

It’s important for investors to understand the concept of FUD so that they don’t get caught in the inevitable waves of negativity that can lead some people to panic and make poor choices.

What Counts as FUD?

Ordinary fears and concerns about market performance, or an investor’s personal long-term goals, don’t count as FUD. FUD refers to a broader market or crypto phenomenon, where highly negative information goes viral and causes investors to panic.


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INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
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Crypto: Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies aren’t endorsed or guaranteed by any government, are volatile, and involve a high degree of risk. Consumer protection and securities laws don’t regulate cryptocurrencies to the same degree as traditional brokerage and investment products. Research and knowledge are essential prerequisites before engaging with any cryptocurrency. US regulators, including FINRA , the SEC , and the CFPB , have issued public advisories concerning digital asset risk. Cryptocurrency purchases should not be made with funds drawn from financial products including student loans, personal loans, mortgage refinancing, savings, retirement funds or traditional investments. Limitations apply to trading certain crypto assets and may not be available to residents of all states.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

2Terms and conditions apply. Earn a bonus (as described below) when you open a new SoFi Digital Assets LLC account and buy at least $50 worth of any cryptocurrency within 7 days. The offer only applies to new crypto accounts, is limited to one per person, and expires on December 31, 2023. Once conditions are met and the account is opened, you will receive your bonus within 7 days. SoFi reserves the right to change or terminate the offer at any time without notice.

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Should I Pull My Money Out of the Stock Market?

When markets are volatile, and you start to see your portfolio shrink, there may be an impulse to pull your money out and put it somewhere safe — but acting on that desire may actually expose you to a higher level of risk.

In fact, there’s a whole field of research devoted to investor behavior, and the financial consequences of following your emotions (hint: the results are less than ideal).

A better strategy might be to anticipate your own natural reactions when markets drop — or when there’s a stock market crash — and wait to make investment choices based on more rational thinking (or even a set of rules you’ve set up for yourself in advance).

After all, for many investors — especially younger investors — time in the market often beats timing the stock market. Here’s an overview of factors investors might weigh when deciding whether to keep money in the stock market.

Investing Can Be an Emotional Ride

An emotion-guided approach to the stock market, whether it’s the sudden offloading or purchasing of stocks, can stem from an attempt to predict the short-term movements in the market. This approach is called timing the market.

And while the notion of trying to predict the perfect time to buy or sell is a familiar one, investors are also prone to specific behaviors or biases that can expose them to further risk of losses.

Giving into Fear

When markets experience a sharp decline, some investors might feel tempted to give in to FUD (fear, uncertainty, doubt). Investors might assume that by selling now they’re shielding themselves from further losses.

This logic, however, presumes that investing in a down market means the market will continue to go down, which — given the volatility of prices and the impossibility of knowing the future — may or may not be the case.

Focusing on temporary declines might compel some investors to make hasty decisions that they may later regret. After all, over time, markets tend to correct.

Following the Crowd

Likewise, when the market is moving upwards, investors can sometimes fall victim to what’s known as FOMO (fear of missing out) — buying under the assumption that today’s growth is a sign of tomorrow’s continued boom. That strategy is not guaranteed to yield success either.

Why Time in the Market Matters

Answering the question, “Should I pull my money out of the stock market?” will depend on an investor’s time horizon — or, the length of time they aim to hold an investment before selling.

Many industry studies have shown that time in the market is typically a wiser approach versus trying to time the stock market or give in to panic selling.

One such groundbreaking study by Brad Barber and Terence Odean was called, “Trading Is Hazardous to Your Wealth: The Common Stock Investment Performance of Individual Investors.”

It was published in April 2000 in the Journal of Finance, and it was one of the first studies to quantify the gap between market returns and investor returns.

•   Market returns are simply the average return of the market itself over a specific period of time.

•   Investor returns, however, are what the average investor tends to reap — and investor returns are significantly lower, the study found, particularly among those who trade more often.

In other words, when investors try to time the market by selling on the dip and buying on the rise, they actually lose out.

By contrast, keeping money in the market for a long period of time can help cut the risk of short-term dips or declines in stock pricing. Staying put despite periods of volatility, for some investors, could be a sound strategy.

An investor’s time horizon may play a significant role in determining whether or not they might want to get out of the stock market. Generally, the longer a period of time an investor has to ride out the market, the less they may want to fret about their portfolio during upheaval.

Compare, for instance, the scenario of a 25-year-old who has decades to make back short-term losses versus someone who is about to retire and needs to begin taking withdrawals from their investment accounts.

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Is It Okay to Pull Out of the Market During a Downturn?

There is nothing wrong with deciding to pull out of the markets if they go south. But if you sell stock or other assets during a downturn, you run the risk of locking in your losses, as they say. Depending on how far values have declined, you might lose some of your gains, or you might lose some or all of your principal.

In a perfect world if you timed it right, you could pull your money out at the right moment and avoid the worst — and then buy back in, just in time to catch the rebound. While this sounds smart, it’s very difficult to pull off.

Benefits of Pulling Out of the Market

The benefit of pulling out of the market and keeping your money in cash is that cash isn’t volatile. Generally speaking, your cash won’t lose value over night, and that can provide some financial as well as psychological comfort.

As noted above if you make your move at the right time, you might prevent steeper losses — but without a crystal ball, there are no guarantees. That said, by using stop-limit orders, you can create your own guardrails by automatically triggering a sale of certain securities if the price hits specific lows.

Disadvantages of Pulling Out of the Market

There are a few disadvantages to pulling cash out of the market during a downturn. First, as discussed earlier, there’s the risk of locking in losses if you sell your holdings too quickly.

Potentially worse is the risk of missing the rebound as well. Locking in losses and then losing out on gains basically acts as a double loss.

When you realize certain losses, as when you realize gains, you will likely have to deal with certain tax consequences.

And while moving to cash may feel safe, because you’re unlikely to see sudden declines in your cash holdings, the reality is that keeping money in cash increases the risk of inflation.

💡 Recommended: How to Protect Your Money From Inflation

Using Limit Orders to Manage Risk

A market order is simply a basic trade, when you buy or sell a stock at the market price. But when markets start to drop, a limit order does just that — it puts a limit on the price at which you’re willing to sell (or buy) securities.

Limit orders are triggered automatically when the security hits a certain price. For sell limit orders, for example, the order will be executed at the price you set or higher. (A buy limit order means the trade will only be executed at that price or lower.)

By using certain types of orders, traders can potentially reduce their risk of losses and avoid unpredictable swings in the market.

Alternatives to Getting Out of the Stock Market

Here’s an overview of some alternatives to getting out of the stock market:

Rotating into Safe Haven Assets

Investors could choose to rotate some of their investments into safe haven assets (i.e. those that aren’t correlated with market volatility). Gold, silver, and bonds are often thought of as some of the safe havens that investors first flock to during times of uncertainty.

By rebalancing a portfolio so fewer holdings are impacted by market volatility, investors might reduce the risk of loss.

Reassessing where to allocate one’s assets is no simple task and, if done too rashly, could lead to losses in the long run. So, it may be helpful for investors to speak with a financial professional before making a big investment change that’s driven by the news of the day.

Having a Diversified Portfolio

Instead of shifting investments into safe haven assets, like precious metals, some investors prefer to cultivate a well-diversified portfolio from the start.

In this case, there’d be less need to rotate funds towards “safer” investments during a decline, as the portfolio would already offer enough diversification to help mitigate the risks of market volatility.

Reinvesting Dividends

Reinvesting dividends may also lead the long-term investor’s portfolio to continue growing at a steady pace, even when share prices decline temporarily. Knowing where and when to reinvest earnings is another factor investors may want to chew on when deciding which strategy to adopt.

(Any dividend-yielding stocks an investor holds must be owned on or before the ex-dividend date. Otherwise, the dividend won’t be credited to the investor’s account. So, if an investor decides to get out of the stock market, they may miss out on dividend payments.)

Rebalancing a Portfolio

Sometimes, astute investors also choose to rebalance their portfolio in a downturn — by buying new stocks. It’s difficult, though not impossible, to profit from new trends that can come forth during a crisis.

It’s worth noting that this investment strategy doesn’t involve pulling money out of the stock market — it just means selling some stocks to buy others.

For example, during the initial shock of the 2020 crisis, many stocks suffered steep declines. But, there were some that outperformed the market due to certain market shifts. Stocks for companies that specialize in work-from-home software, like those in the video conferencing space, saw increases in value.

Bear in mind, though, that these gains are often temporary. For example, home workout equipment, like exercise bikes, became in high demand, leading related stocks higher. Some remote-based healthcare companies saw share prices rise. But in some cases, these gains were short-lived.

Also, for newer investors or those with low risk tolerance, attempting this strategy might not be a desirable option.

Reassessing Asset Allocation

During downturns, it could be worthwhile for investors to examine their asset allocations — or, the amount of money an investor holds in each asset.

If an investor holds stocks in industries that have been struggling and may continue to struggle due to floundering demand (think restaurants, retail, or oil in 2020), they may opt to sell some of the stocks that are declining in value.

Even if such holdings get sold at a loss, the investor could then put money earned from the sale of these stocks towards safe haven assets — potentially gaining back their recent losses.

Holding Cash Has Its Benefits

Cash can be an added asset, too. Naturally, the value of cash is shaped by things like inflation, so its purchase power can swing up and down. Still, there are advantages to stockpiling some cash. Money invested in other assets, after all, is — by definition — tied up in that asset. That money is not immediately liquid.

Cash, on the other hand, could be set aside in a savings account or in an emergency fund — unencumbered by a specific investment. Here are some potential benefits to cash holdings:

First, on a psychological level, an investor who knows they have cash on hand may be less prone to feel they’re at risk of losing it all (when stocks fluctuate or flail).

A secondary benefit of cash involves having some “dry powder” — or, money on hand that could be used to buy additional stocks if the market keeps dipping. In investing, it can pay to a “contrarian,” running against the crowd. In other words, when others are selling (aka being fearful), a savvy investor might want to buy.

The Takeaway

Pulling money out of the market during a downturn is a natural impulse for many investors. After all, everyone wants to avoid losses. But attempting to time the market (when there’s no crystal ball) can be risky and stressful.

For many investors, especially younger investors with a longer time horizon, keeping money in the stock market may carry advantages over time. One approach to investing is to establish long-term investment goals and then strive to stay the course — even when facing market headwinds.

Always, when it comes to investing in the stock market, there’s no guarantee of increasing returns. So, individual investors will want to examine their personal economic needs and short-term and future financial goals before deciding when and how to invest.

While managing money during a market downturn might seem tricky, getting started with investing doesn’t need to be. It’s easy, convenient, and secure to set up an investment account with SoFi Invest.

SoFi Invest® is a secure app where users can take care of all their investment needs — including trading stocks, investing in IPO shares, and more. It also gives SoFi members access to complimentary financial advice and actionable market insights. Ready to start investing?

For a limited time, opening and funding an Active Invest account gives you the opportunity to get up to $1,000 in the stock of your choice.

FAQ

Should you pull out of the stock market?

Ideally, you don’t want to impulsively pull your money out of the market when there is a crisis or sudden volatility. While a down market can be unnerving, and the desire to put your money into safe investments is understandable, this can actually expose you to more risk.

When is it smart to pull out of stocks?

In some cases it might be smart to pull your money out of certain stocks when they reach a predetermined price (you can use a limit order to set those guardrails); when you want to buy into new opportunities; or add diversification to your portfolio.

What are your options for getting out of the stock market?

There are always options besides the stock market. The ones that are most appealing depend on your goals. You can invest in safe haven investments (e.g. bonds or precious metals), you can put your money into cash; you can consider other assets such as real estate.


SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Financial Tips & Strategies: The tips provided on this website are of a general nature and do not take into account your specific objectives, financial situation, and needs. You should always consider their appropriateness given your own circumstances.

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Tips for Investing in Tech Stocks

It’s almost become a trope at this point. Your friend’s aunt bought some Apple stock way back when and now lives full-time on a yacht. Or your cousin knows somebody who knows somebody who bought some Microsoft stock for a few dollars a share in the ’80s, and now they’re a multimillionaire.

These stories are practically the stuff of urban legend. But if you’re looking to buy a first tech stock or want to add some diversity to your portfolio, you may find the reality to be slightly different from the stories. There are many kinds of tech stocks, each with its own performance trends, pros, and cons. Here are a few fundamental truths worth knowing about investing in tech stocks.

Why Investors Are Investing in Technology

Much of the recent growth in the stock market overall has been concentrated in the shares of technology companies. Technology stocks, as measured by the S&P Technology Select Sector Index, rose 129.8%, or 18.11% annually, during the past five years. In contrast, during that period, the broad S&P 500 Index grew by 60.2%, or 9.9% annually.

The top five most valuable companies in the S&P 500 are technology-related companies. These firms — Apple, Microsoft, Alphabet (the parent company of Google), Amazon, and Tesla — have an average market capitalization, or overall stock value, near $1 trillion or more. And during the past five years, the stocks of these companies have experienced substantial growth.

Five Largest Companies in the S&P 500 Index
Company

Ticker

Market Cap*

5-year growth*

Apple AAPL $2.5 trillion 302.5%
Microsoft MSFT $1.9 trillion 256.0%
Alphabet GOOGL $1.4 trillion 134.7%
Amazon AMZN $1.3 trillion 170.6%
Tesla TSLA $868.5 billion 1,104.6%
*As of Sep. 2, 2022

Investors flock to technology companies, especially the previously mentioned tech giants, because they’re often considered solid businesses.

The products of technology companies — especially software companies — are relatively cheap to reproduce but can be quite expensive to buy. Apple, for example, prices iPhones ahead of their competitors, sells a lot of them, and then operates an ecosystem of apps and services that generate steady revenue. Amazon’s success is attributed to the effectiveness of its operations and low prices. For Alphabet, the sheer scope of its networks and the popularity of its services allows them to sell more ads than its competitors.

Aside from the giants that have established business models, many investors pour money into tech companies due to the promise of future earnings. Even when tech companies are not profitable or see regular cash flows, investors will still support the stocks because of the potential for future earnings. Companies like Amazon and Tesla took years before they turned steady profits.

Popular Technology Stocks to Own

The technology industry is incredibly diverse. Beyond the five companies mentioned above, these are some of investors’ most widely held technology stocks.

Companies in the S&P Technology Select Sector Index
Company

Ticker

Technology Sector

Market Cap*

5-year growth*

Nvidia NVDA Semiconductors $539.4 billion 233.8%
Broadcom AVGO Semiconductors $198.7 billion 104.7%
Adobe ADBE Software $219.7 billion 137.0%
Cisco Systems CSCO Communications Equipment $187.5 billion 41.6%
Salesforce CRM Software $153.5 billion 59.9%
*As of Sep. 2, 2022

How Can You Invest in Tech Stocks?

At the most basic level, you can invest in tech stock by buying the individual stocks of an appealing company.

Another way to invest in tech is by trading technology-focused exchange-traded funds (ETFs) or mutual funds. Tech ETFs and mutual funds allow investors to diversify their investments in a single security, which may be less risky than buying a specific company’s stock.

If you are interested in a particular tech sector — like artificial intelligence or green tech — you can invest in more targeted funds rather than broad-based technology-focused ETFs.

Different Sectors for Technological Investment

The technology industry is vast, filled with companies specializing in different areas of the market. For an investor, this means it’s possible to diversify, investing in tech stocks across various sectors.

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI), which refers to ways that computers can process data and automate decision-making that humans would otherwise do, is a burgeoning tech sector. Many companies are operating in this sector, using new technologies to support fields like finance and healthcare. Artificial Intelligence, along with the related field of Machine Learning (ML), has long been one of the most exciting technology areas.

Transportation

Another bustling sector of the industry is transportation. Tech underlies all transportation, and some of the most exciting companies are building electric cars, creating the batteries and software that support the navigation and operational systems in automobiles, or using software to connect drivers and passengers.

💡 Recommended: Investing in Transportation Stocks for Beginners

Streaming

Streaming companies have completely revolutionized the entertainment industry. These companies offer direct-to-consumer content, including shows and movies, that is bundled in a monthly subscription. There are standalone streaming companies, companies that include streaming as an ever-growing part of their business, and companies that build digital and physical infrastructure to support streaming services.

Information Technology

Information technology (IT) is one of the broadest and most valuable sectors of the technology industry. It typically refers to how businesses store, transmit, and use information and data within and between networks of computers.

Semiconductor Technology

Semiconductors are arguably the foundation of all technology. Semiconductor companies make components found in phones, computers, and other electronic devices. The manufacturing process for semiconductors is incredibly precise and expensive, making the industry ruthlessly competitive.

Web 3.0

In recent years, cryptocurrency, blockchain technology, and Web 3.0 have been the focus of many investors. That’s because computer engineers and companies are now developing new technologies that will allow users to interact with the web in a more interactive, personal, and secure way. These new technologies, like blockchain, crypto, and the metaverse, may usher in new opportunities for investors.

💡 Recommended: Web 3.0 Guide for Beginners

Evaluating a Tech Stock Before Investing

When investing, you must carefully evaluate the stocks you’re interested in.

Technology companies, in particular, tend to have high price-to-earnings (P/E) ratios, meaning that the company’s profits may seem low compared to the price of their shares. This is often because investors are expecting rapid future growth.

Other key metrics include price-to-sales, which compares the stock price to the company’s revenue. This is something to consider in the case of a fast-growing company that doesn’t yet have substantial profits.

Another critical factor is the company’s overall revenue growth — the pace at which revenue increases year-over-year or even quarter-over-quarter.

A more detailed metric that can be useful for tech companies is “gross margins,” which is the difference between a company’s revenue or sales and the cost of generating those sales, divided by total revenue. The resulting percentage indicates whether the company can make money on the actual product it sells and how much. If the company’s other costs can go down as a percentage of total revenue, profits can grow more quickly.

💡 Recommended: The Ultimate List of Financial Ratios

Pros of Adding Tech Stocks to a Portfolio

There are many benefits to investing in tech stocks, most notably attractive returns. With artificial intelligence, blockchain, and Web 3.0 technologies on the horizon, there are increasing opportunities to invest in this sector. These are some possible benefits of adding tech stocks to a portfolio.

•   There are many blue chip tech companies. Blue chip stocks typically refer to stocks from long-established companies with good returns. Today’s blue chips include huge tech companies like Apple, Alphabet, and Amazon.

•   Some tech stocks pay dividends. There can be benefits to dividend-paying stocks, including consistent earnings, which might indicate that the company is positioned to deliver strong performance.

•   Investors can buy shares in things they use. Most people use some tech in their daily routines. You might have a smartphone, or a laptop, hop on a social network, or order groceries or clothing online. With a tech stock, investors can buy a little piece of the companies they know and like.

•   It’s easy to diversify in tech. Tech stocks aren’t a monolith. Investors can add diversity to their portfolio by purchasing different aspects of the tech sector, for example, buying stock in social media companies, smartphone glass manufacturers, hardware makers, software companies, and even green tech companies.

A great thing about the tech sector investing space is that there’s so much of it out there, and investors should be able to find something that works for their goals, ambition, and knowledge base.

💡 Recommended: How to Invest in Web 3.0 for Beginners

Cons of Investing in Technology

All stocks come with their own risks and potential downsides. Tech stocks are no different. As with any stock purchase, it’s helpful to do a good amount of research before buying a stock. Take these considerations into account before deciding to pull the trigger on a tech stock.

•   The potential for tech backlash. Some experts think increased regulation and government scrutiny could lead to a backlash against tech stocks that could affect their prospects. They cite 2018’s passage of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and Facebook’s hearings before Congress as evidence that even more regulation might be coming in the future. But like many other sectors of the stock market, various tech stocks react differently in the face of volatility.

•   Buying what you know can be complicated. You might have a solid grasp on some social media giants, for example, but some of the nuances of emerging semiconductor firms might be a little harder to wrap your head around. You may have to ask yourself if you want to invest in a company that you might not fully understand.

•   Stocks may be priced too high. Some tech companies, like Amazon and Google, often have shares that venture into the four figures, so for a first-time tech stock investor, those companies may feel out of reach. However, many tech companies occasionally engage in a stock split to decrease their share prices.

Do You See the Most Returns When Investing in Tech Stocks?

Most returns when investing in tech stock can vary depending on the specific company and the current market conditions. Nonetheless, many investors believe that tech stocks generally have a higher potential for growth than other types of stocks, making them a good choice for those looking to generate returns. During the past five years, technology stocks rose a total of 129.8%, while the broad S&P 500 Index grew by 60.2%.

But just because tech stocks have outperformed other industries, it doesn’t mean that it will always be that way. During 2022, for example, tech stocks have declined 22.7% through Aug., while the S&P 500 fell 16.8% year-to-date.

💡 Recommended: Lessons From the Dotcom Bubble

How Frequently Should You Invest in Tech Stocks?

The frequency you invest in tech stocks will depend on your individual investment goals and risk tolerance. Some investors may choose to trade tech stocks monthly or quarterly to take advantage of any short-term price fluctuations. Others may invest in tech stocks on a more long-term basis, holding onto their shares for several years to benefit from any potential long-term growth.

What Percentage of Your Portfolio Should Be Tech Stocks?

The percentage of a portfolio allocated to tech stocks differs for every investor. Some experts recommend that investors allocate no more than 20-30% of their investment portfolio to tech stocks, but this percentage may be higher or lower depending on the investor’s risk tolerance, investment goals, and other factors.

Mistakes to Avoid When Investing in Tech Stocks

Many investors are drawn to tech stocks because of the potential for a significant return. But the allure of large gains may cause investors to take on too much risk or lose sight of their overall investment goals.

For example, you don’t want to invest in a tech stock just because it’s popular. It’s easy to fear you are missing out when you see a particular stock’s price skyrocket. You may hear about a tech stock lot in the financial media, and you know many people who say they own it, but that doesn’t mean it’s a good investment.

Additionally, you should avoid investing in a stock just because the company is a household name. While sometimes the stocks of well-known companies do well, there are other cases of these companies not being well run and thus not being a good investment.

The Takeaway

The tech sector is vast and getting bigger by the moment as blockchain, artificial intelligence, and other technologies push boundaries. New founders are working on startups in garages and basements, potentially developing the next new thing that could change the world. Investors looking to invest in tech stocks can find a stock or ETF out there that could meet their needs. For instance, SoFi ETFs can remove some of the headache from picking individual stocks by allowing you to invest in a bundle of companies all at once.

SoFi makes it easy to invest in tech stocks and more with an online brokerage account. With the SoFi app, you can trade stocks, ETFs, and fractional shares with no commissions for as little as $5. You’ll also get real time investing news, curated content, and other relevant data for the stocks that matter most to you. For a limited time, funding an account gives you the opportunity to win up to $1,000 in the stock of your choice. All you have to do is open and fund a SoFi Invest account.

Get started trading technology stocks and ETFs with SoFi Invest® today

FAQ

Why is investing in tech stocks so popular?

Tech stocks are popular because they are some of the largest and best performing assets in the financial markets. As a whole, the technology sector is one of the fastest growing sectors in the economy. This means that there are a lot of new and innovative companies that are constantly coming out with new products and services. This provides investors with a lot of growth potential.

How can you start investing in tech stocks today?

You can start investing in tech stocks by trading individual stocks, invest in a tech-focused mutual fund or ETF, or invest in a more general stock market index fund that includes a mix of tech and non-tech companies.


SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs): Investors should carefully consider the information contained in the prospectus, which contains the Fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other relevant information. You may obtain a prospectus from the Fund company’s website or by email customer service at [email protected]. Please read the prospectus carefully prior to investing.
Shares of ETFs must be bought and sold at market price, which can vary significantly from the Fund’s net asset value (NAV). Investment returns are subject to market volatility and shares may be worth more or less their original value when redeemed. The diversification of an ETF will not protect against loss. An ETF may not achieve its stated investment objective. Rebalancing and other activities within the fund may be subject to tax consequences.


Claw Promotion: Customer must fund their Active Invest account with at least $25 within 30 days of opening the account. Probability of customer receiving $1,000 is 0.028%. See full terms and conditions.

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Will Dogecoin Ever Be Capped?

Will Dogecoin Ever Be Capped?

When evaluating a cryptocurrency, such as Dogecoin, it’s important to know whether it has a supply cap, since that can have an impact on the long-term value of the coin.

Bitcoin, the first and largest cryptocurrency by market cap, is known for having a 21 million coin hard cap, meaning there will only ever be 21 million BTC in existence. Similarly, XRP has a cap of 100 million. However, all cryptocurrencies are different and many do not have a supply cap.

Here’s what you need to know when it comes to the Dogecoin cap.

What Is a Cap in Crypto?

A supply cap, or cap, refers to the upper limit of the amount of new cryptocurrency coins that can be created.

Once miners have mined a certain number of coins, the protocol will stop distributing block rewards, and miners will only collect transaction fees. For Bitcoin, this point is estimated to be reached by about the year 2140, for other types of crypto the cap will be reached at different times.

💡 Recommended: How Many Bitcoins Are Left?

Does Dogecoin Have a Cap?

No, Dogecoin does not have a cap, meaning there is no Dogecoin supply limit. But there is a fixed reward of 10,000 DOGE for each block of transactions added to the Dogecoin blockchain (more on that below).

Thus, miners have an incentive to mine for Dogecoins. After they mine Dogecoin, they can move it from their wallets onto a crypto exchange where other investors can buy it. But as more miners come online, more of them will dump new coins onto the market, causing the price to fall.

Either way, it’s important to understand how the lack of a Dogecoin cap (i.e. the fact that there is no Dogecoin supply limit) can affect this crypto’s long-term value.

How Dogecoin Works

Developers Billy Marcus and Jackson Palmer launched Dogecoin as a low-stakes way for people to learn about cryptocurrency. The meme coin or joke coin, with its famous Shiba Inu logo, traded at a tiny fraction of a penny so people could send it to each other for fun while learning how to use crypto wallets.

In 2018, as cryptocurrencies caught the attention of mainstream investors, the altcoin reached more than $0.01. In 2021, Dogecoin attained record highs around $0.70 before crashing down to about $0.06, as of September 7, 2022.

DOGE is a proof-of-work (PoW) crypto, which means that mining Dogecoin involves running powerful computers known as nodes that process transactions for the network. In exchange for this work, miners receive block rewards of 10,000 newly minted DOGE.

A new block of transactions is mined roughly every minute on the Dogecoin network. The block reward is 10,000 DOGE, or about $600 as of September 7, 2022. Unlike Bitcoin, which has a hard cap of 21 million and releases fewer coins over time, there is no Dogecoin supply cap.

Is There a Limit to the Dogecoin Supply?

Is Dogecoin unlimited? Yes, as of September 7, 2022, there is no Dogecoin supply limit. But the reality is that 10,000 DOGE are mined every minute, which adds up to about 14.4 million DOGE per day, and over 5 billion DOGE per year added to the supply.

Although some argue that the vast number DOGE may depress the price.

Will Dogecoin Ever Have a Cap?

It’s hard to say for certain whether there will ever be a Dogecoin cap. In theory, DOGE developers could choose to implement a cap on the creation of new coins, but to date there hasn’t been much discussion about this.

Sometimes the crypto community decides to alter the protocol of a currency. An active cryptocurrency needs periodic upgrades to its software to remain functional, relevant, and secure.

For now, it seems reasonable to work from the assumption that there might never be a Dogecoin cap limit.

Has Dogecoin Ever Been Capped?

In the eight years since Dogecoin’s creation, there’s never been a cap on the crypto. In fact, for much of those eight years, no one thought much about DOGE at all and it traded for less than a penny.

In 2017 when cryptocurrency began reaching the masses in a big way, the valuation of DOGE hit $1 billion. Many investors considered this a sign of irrational exuberance in the crypto markets, as DOGE had no special features (it’s simply a clone of Litecoin, which is a clone of Bitcoin), and hadn’t had a developer update in three years at that time.

Nonetheless, in 2021 DOGE took a seat among the top 10 cryptocurrencies by market cap, a feat few would have thought possible just a year earlier.

Get up to $1,000 in stock when you fund a new Active Invest account.*

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*Customer must fund their Active Invest account with at least $25 within 30 days of opening the account. Probability of customer receiving $1,000 is 0.028%. See full terms and conditions.

3 Reasons Why Dogecoin Doesn’t Have a Cap

Some say the decision to not cap the supply of DOGE was intentional on the part of developers. They wanted to create a currency that people would be more likely to spend. DOGE was created as a joke, but it was also intended to be used for transactional purposes.

The DOGE developers set out to create a cryptocurrency that would differ from Bitcoin in several key ways. Most if not all of those ways stem from the fact that there is no Dogecoin max supply.

Here are three reasons that are thought to have been big factors contributing to the decision to never implement a cap on Dogecoin.

1. Cheap Transactions

Dogecoin is an altcoin that developers created for spending meant to be spent, so they intentionally made it inflationary (meaning that the supply of DOGE increases, or inflates over time).

By contrast, Bitcoin is deflationary (the supply of BTC decreases over time), which makes its value relative to inflationary currencies likely to continue rising. As a result, BTC has become more of a store of value investment, making many investors want to HODL it.

If you think your Bitcoin might be worth twice as much next year, you’re less likely to use it to make purchases in the short term. But a currency like DOGE, with no supply cap, is more likely to be spent. People will use it today, while it still has value, and be less likely to hold it for the long-term as they know it’s unlikely to increase in price.

2. New Coins Forever

It’s estimated that about 20% of all the Bitcoins mined to-date have been lost forever. This happens when people forget their wallet password or lose a piece of physical hardware they used to store Bitcoin. This makes the supply of BTC even more deflationary, as those coins won’t be replaced. Meaning: A deflating supply means that the value may rise over time, assuming demand doesn’t decrease.

With Dogecoin, there will always be plenty of new coins. Even if someone loses millions of DOGE, the long-term impact is minimal, since there are constantly new coins going into circulation. With no supply cap, lost coins don’t matter as much.

3. Mining Longevity

At some point, there will be no more Bitcoins left to mine. When that happens, the only monetary incentive for mining BTC to keep the network secure will be transaction fees.

In theory, this could sustain miners interest in mining DOGE.

Pros and Cons of a Capless Cryptocurrency

Should there be a Dogecoin cap? It’s a good question, given the relative successes and failures of DOGE thus far. Here are some advantages and disadvantages.

Pros

By keeping DOGE as an inflationary currency, it’s more likely that people will spend it rather than hold it as a store of value.

With no Dogecoin cap, theoretically miners will always be able to mine more DOGE and keep earning Dogecoin as a reward.

Cons

Because it’s inflationary, DOGE has less appeal for buy-and-hold investors.

With its unlimited supply, the value of DOGE may never rise much above $1.00. At its peak in May of 2021, it was worth about $0.70.

Pros

Cons

DOGE has value as a transactional currency. Low demand from buy-and-hold investors.
Miners can always mine more DOGE and get rewards. Price unlikely to rise above historic high of $0.70.

How Many Dogecoin Are in Circulation?

According to CoinMarketCap data, there are about 132.6 billion DOGE in circulation as of Sept. 7, 2022. Keep in mind, 10,000 new DOGE are mined every minute, so the number will be higher by the time you read this.

It’s also worth noting that more than half of DOGE’s total supply is held by only about 20 different wallet addresses, making it one of the most unevenly distributed of the different types of cryptocurrency.

How Many New Dogecoin Are Created Every Day?

Every time a new block of transactions is added to the Dogecoin blockchain, 10,000 DOGE are mined. That’s about 14.4 million DOGE added per day, or about 5.26 billion per year.

How Much Dogecoin is Left?

There is an unlimited amount of DOGE left to be mined. Just like U.S. dollars or any other national fiat currency, there’s no upward limit on the creation of Dogecoins.

There are some key differences between DOGE and fiat currencies, of course, like the fact that anyone can mine Dogecoin, but only central banks can print money.

The Takeaway

The answer to the question, Will Dogecoin ever be capped? is likely a “no.” Nothing is for certain, as developers could decide to alter the Dogecoin protocol, but the history of the coin and the ethos of the community surrounding it suggest that they will not enact a cap.

Just as the Bitcoin community tends to value scarcity and a fixed supply cap, the Dogecoin community tends to value low transaction fees, large block rewards, and the other benefits that can arise from not having a supply cap. For investors, there may be a place for both types of cryptocurrency in their portfolio.

FAQ

Is there a cap on the supply of Dogecoin?

No, Dogecoin does not have a cap on its supply.

Will DOGE be capped at $1?

At the moment, there are no signs that DOGE will have a price cap or a supply cap.

Is the supply of Dogecoin infinite?

In theory, the supply of Dogecoin could be infinite. In reality, though, the annual supply is somewhat limited by the block reward, which is 10,000 DOGE per minute.


Photo credit: iStock/Amax Photo

2
SoFi Invest®
INVESTMENTS ARE NOT FDIC INSURED • ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED • MAY LOSE VALUE
SoFi Invest encompasses two distinct companies, with various products and services offered to investors as described below: Individual customer accounts may be subject to the terms applicable to one or more of these platforms.
1) Automated Investing and advisory services are provided by SoFi Wealth LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser (“SoFi Wealth“). Brokerage services are provided to SoFi Wealth LLC by SoFi Securities LLC.
2) Active Investing and brokerage services are provided by SoFi Securities LLC, Member FINRA (www.finra.org)/SIPC(www.sipc.org). Clearing and custody of all securities are provided by APEX Clearing Corporation.
For additional disclosures related to the SoFi Invest platforms described above please visit SoFi.com/legal.
Neither the Investment Advisor Representatives of SoFi Wealth, nor the Registered Representatives of SoFi Securities are compensated for the sale of any product or service sold through any SoFi Invest platform.

Crypto: Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies aren’t endorsed or guaranteed by any government, are volatile, and involve a high degree of risk. Consumer protection and securities laws don’t regulate cryptocurrencies to the same degree as traditional brokerage and investment products. Research and knowledge are essential prerequisites before engaging with any cryptocurrency. US regulators, including FINRA , the SEC , and the CFPB , have issued public advisories concerning digital asset risk. Cryptocurrency purchases should not be made with funds drawn from financial products including student loans, personal loans, mortgage refinancing, savings, retirement funds or traditional investments. Limitations apply to trading certain crypto assets and may not be available to residents of all states.

Investment Risk: Diversification can help reduce some investment risk. It cannot guarantee profit, or fully protect in a down market.

2Terms and conditions apply. Earn a bonus (as described below) when you open a new SoFi Digital Assets LLC account and buy at least $50 worth of any cryptocurrency within 7 days. The offer only applies to new crypto accounts, is limited to one per person, and expires on December 31, 2023. Once conditions are met and the account is opened, you will receive your bonus within 7 days. SoFi reserves the right to change or terminate the offer at any time without notice.

First Trade Amount Bonus Payout
Low High
$50 $99.99 $10
$100 $499.99 $15
$500 $4,999.99 $50
$5,000+ $100

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