FEATURED BLOG POST

Millennials Are Seeking Prenups—and It Might Just Be Worth Considering

Read More

This Is the Exact Personal Finance Advice All Engineering Grads Need

Living as an engineering student for years, on a student budget, requires a very special set of financial survival skills. Ingrained habits like living frugally, postponing major expenses, and maybe not looking too hard at your debt balances while your loans are in deferment are necessary for getting through when money is tight.

As a newly-minted engineer, you should enjoy the rewards of completing this stage of your education, because you’ve certainly earned it. But don’t let the frugal mindset that propelled you during your college years start to withdraw as those first hefty engineering salary paychecks roll in. Even if you don’t see yourself becoming a big spender, when the transition from student to full-time employment happens, it’s easy to just tear up your student budget without creating a new one.

Read more

15 Top States Where Professionals with Student Debt Own Homes

Many SoFi members choose to invest in themselves as homeowners while still paying down student debt. It’s a natural extension of the way they invested in themselves as professionals with top-flight educations and advanced degrees. Now, some of the hottest real estate markets in the nation are drawing them. From MBAs in Illinois and computer scientists in Oregon to lawyers in Texas, SoFi members are becoming homeowners just about everywhere you look.

Read more

A Visual History of Cash, From Beads to Bitcoin

How did we get from counting wealth in beads and shells to buying a car with a thumbprint? The nature of money is constantly changing, and the way we earn, store, and spend it changes too.

One constant is that money exists to help us move value from point A to point B, without having to haul heavy trade goods around. That’s why the ancients came up with a money system as soon as they had enough valuable items to store and sell. “An entire warehouse of olive oil, beer, or wheat could be reduced in value to an easily transported ingot of gold or silver,” writes Jack Weatherford in The History Of Money.

A complete history of money around the world takes up several books (we’ve got the reading list below to prove it), but here are some highlights from millennia of monetary innovation to enjoy and share.

Read more
SoFi member Ashley Abaie on refinancing dental school debt

From Globetrotter to Desert Dentist: How Ashley Abaie Refinanced Her Undergrad Debt and Saved Over $10K

In our latest SoFi member spotlight, we celebrate Dentist’s Day by spotlighting member Ashley Abaie. Ashley provides reduced cost dental care to the Native American, underserved, and homeless populations of the Phoenix area.

After withdrawing from her first college she spent years traveling the world, and as a result discovered a passion for healthcare and service. She returned to the U.S., earned a degree in international public health, and then went to dental school.

Ashley spoke with us about how she’s tending to her undergraduate loans, paying off her dental student debt through service, and finding the right work/life balance for her and her young son. Her story drives home how finding the right career can take a lot of soul searching and travel to see how other people live.

Read more
How the World's Top Five Nations Handle Student Loan Debt

How The World’s Top 5 Nations in Education Handle Student Loan Debt

Concerns about the rising cost of college in the United States—and the $1.4 trillion in student loan debt nationwide—are alive and well. And they’ve prompted a lot of discussion about the different ways our educational peers nearby, across the pond, and beyond handle student loan repayment programs. When it comes to tuition costs and paying off student loans, the American system is unique—and not for all the reasons you might think.

It turns out that cheap or even free tuition doesn’t mean the end of student loans. Student loans are common even in countries with free tuition, because no matter where you go to college, you have to live somewhere and, of course, eat. Sweden gets a lot of attention because tuition there is free. Still, Swedish students borrow money for college just as frequently as Americans do—and about 70% of students in both countries have student loans. But Swedish students graduate with about $20,000 in debt, compared to about $30,000 for American graduates.

To explore how the rest of the world pays for learning, we looked at the most recent QS World University Rankings. Thirty-two of the top 100 schools are in the U.S. Another 32 are found in just four countries: the United Kingdom, Germany, Australia, and Canada. Below, we compare the way higher education is financed in all five nations, in descending rank order.

Read more
Page 1 of 3123
SSL Encrypted
Equal Housing Lender